JOHN J. ADAMS was born in England February 27, 1845. His parents died when he was bout eight years of age. He attended school until about sixteen, and was then employed for a short time in a dry goods store in London; he was afterward employed by a pawn broker in the same city, with whom he remained till twenty-one years of age. In 1866, he came to America and located in Grundy County, Ill., where he worked on a farm. February 2, 1867, he married Fanny, daughter of Lawrence and Isabella (Hannihan) Wills, and born September 30, 1843. To this union five children have been born - Frederick W., December 2, 1868; Sylvia B., September 2, 1870; Annie M. and a twin sister (deceased), November 12, 1872, and James E., April 30, 1877. In 1879, Mr. Adams came to this township, purchased eighty acres of land, partially improved, and has now a finely improved farm of 160 acres. Mr. Adams and wife are attendants at the M.E. Church, and in politics, he is a Republican.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


JOHN C. BREWER was born in North Carolina April 7, 1817, and is the son of William and Elizabeth (Cavaness) Brewer, of whom the former was born in North Carolina in 1768, and the latter in Virginia in 1770. When John C. was aged about twelve, his parents came to Morgan County, this State. There our subject worked at the carpenterís trade from the age of seventeen until April 6, 1836, when he married Mary E., daughter of Noah Wilhite, of Oldham County, Ky. To this union were born eleven children - Urban C., June 27, 1837; Parthena A., January 31, 1839; Minerva J., December 6, 1840; Mary E. (deceased), December 12, 1842; William A., March 17, 1845; Cynthia M., April 8, 1848; Candace C. (deceased), May 21, 1850; John H., December 7, 1852; Theodocia (and a twin sister who died in infancy), November 8, 1855, and Malinda C., October 8, 1858. After his marriage, Mr. Brewer engaged in various pursuits until 1857, when he came to White Post Township, this county, where he farmed until 1860; he then came to Francesville, farmed two years; he was then appointed Postmaster under Lincoln, started a general store, and in 1874 was reappointed Postmaster under Grant, but three years later was compelled to relinquish business on account of ill health. From 1861 to 1863, he kept the Brewer House in Francesville. Mr. B. is a Mason, and he and wife are members of Christian Church. Frederick Cavaness, grandfather of our subject, was born in England and died in North Carolina about 1823; his grandmother was a native of Holland, and died in North Carolina in about 1825.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


WILLIAM A. BREWER, son of John C. and Mary E. (Wilhite) Brewer, was born in Morgan County, Ind., March 17, 1845, and there attended school till aged about seventeen, when his father moved his family to White Post Township, this county. William worked on the home farm for awhile and then came to Francesville and clerked for some time. April 15, 1866, he married Margaret M., daughter of Dr. Robert Mattingly, and to this union were born five children - Mary E., January 3, 1867; Cora M., March 4, 1869; Robert C., March 4, 1871; Margaret E., March 5, 1873, and Willie, in January, 1874, at which time Mrs. Brewer died. April 1, 1869, Mr. Brewer was appointed agent for the American Express Company, and he still holds the position; at the same time he engaged in the lumber business to some extent - his largest sale in one day reaching 130,000 feet of fencing. February 14, 1875, he married Eliza A., daughter of Abraham and Gramilda Ann (Wilson) Dennis, who has borne him five children - Otho D. and Guy D., September 9, 1876; Paul B., May 6, 1878; Gramilda, August 13, 1880, and Jennie F., September 4, 1882 (died September 18, 1882). In August, 1878, Mr. Brewer engaged in general merchandising, and has now a fine store well stocked with a full line of dry goods, clothing, hats and caps, boots and shoes, ladiesí and gentsí furnishing goods, groceries, canned goods, game, etc., etc. Mr. Brewer is a Mason, a member of the Christian Church and a Republican. Mrs. Brewer is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


JACOB KEISER was born in Clarion County, Penn., November 12, 1838. His mother died when he was but seven years of age, and Jacob was taken charge of by Judge Charles Evans, who also died within a few years; with the widow, Jacob remained until fifteen, and then indentured himself to Col. William Alexander, publisher of the Democrat, at Clarion, for three years, at $50 per year. After finishing this trade, he contributed to the support of his father, who was a cripple and well advanced in life. In 1856, he came as far west as Wabash, Ind., walking nearly the entire distance, and the next spring returned to Clarion and re-entered the Democrat office. In the spring of 1859, he went to Jefferson County, Penn., and engaged in logging and rafting; thence he went to Pittsburgh, where he joined a crew for rafting lumber to Louisville, which proved a pleasant trip of nineteen and one-half days. From Louisville he went to Indianapolis, working a various points on the road; from Indianapolis he walked to Crawfordsville, working at his trade meanwhile, and thence to Danville, Ill., where he enlisted in the Thirty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry as private. He served with his regiment through the Missouri campaign, participating in the battles of Pea Ridge; for meritorious conduct in this fight he was made Second Lieutenant. He took part in the march to Batesville, Ark., and to Cape Giradeau, and thence was sent with his brigade to Pittsburg Landing. He was in the battles of Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga and Mission Ridge. After the fight of Stone River, he was made First Lieutenant, although he had commanded his company from the time of the Pea Ridge fight, his Captain being on detached duty. He resigned in 1864, and returned to Danville; then took a position on the Daily Journal in La Fayette, and then went to Rensselaer and took charge of the Gazette. In 1868, he formed a copartnership with Col. J. Healy in the publication of the Iroquois Press; a year later he sold his interest and purchased the Winamac Republican, commencing the publication in March, 1869, and succeeded in making it a most renumerable journal. In 1872, he was appointed Postmaster of Winamac; in 1880, he resigned, and was elected State Senator. He was married in 1865 to Miss Mary J. Baker, daughter of Seth Baker, of Rensselaer, Jasper Co., Ind. His life has been a busy one, and his journal is recognized as one of the most influential in Northwestern Indiana.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - City of Winamac" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


HENRY KITTINGER, M.D., was born in Buffalo, N.Y., July 21, 1830. Samuel Kittinger, his father, was a carpenter by trade, and was for many years a musician in Buffalo. He married Miss Lucy Grosh, in Lancaster County, Penn., and was by her the father of four children, of whom Henry and a sister only are yet living. He came with his family to Richland County, Ohio, in about 1835, and there died about 1839. Mrs. Lucy Kittinger afterward married Charles Doyle, and is now living, again a widow, in Dayton, Ohio. Dr. Kittinger accompanied his parents to Ohio, and was there reared. His early life was one of hardship and self-denial. The step-father died when Henry was about sixteen, and the care of the family fell upon the latter, he being the eldest of the children, and thus he was deprived of an opportunity for early study. In 1855, he left the family at Dayton in comfortable circumstances, but for many years continued to remit money for the support of those whom he had left behind. He first located at Peru, Ind., and engaged in making brick for the court house; thence he went to Kokomo, where, in 1862, he began the study of medicine under Dr. H.C. Cole; attended lectures the winter of 1864-65 at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and outside the regular course studied qualitative analysis, toxicology, and urine analysis. The spring of 1865, he went to Columbus, and in June graduated from the Starling Medical College. He then came to Winamac and entered upon the practice of his profession, acquiring a large and lucrative practice patronage. In 1874, he took a course at Bellevue, N.Y., graduating in February, 1875; he also received special instruction at the New York and Manhattan Eye and Ear Infirmaries; at De Miltís Dispensary, on throat diseases; special private instruction in surgery, under Drs. Frank H. Hamilton and Alexander B. Mott; and physical diagnosis under Drs. A. Flint and E.G. Janeway. Returning to Winamac, he continued in practice until within the past few years, since when he has gradually retired from country and night practice, owing to failing health. Although he yet practices considerably, he is in partnership in corn buying, dealing in lumber, and in operating a planing-mill. He is a member both of the Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities, and is an Independent Republican. He was married, October 31, 1878, to Elizabeth A. Wilson, a daughter of Richard and Lucy (Webb) Wilson.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - City of Winamac" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


JOHN KRUGER, County Sheriff, is a native of Mecklinburg, Germany, born February 19, 1849. He is one of eight children, six yet living, born to Frederick and Jane Kruger, who emigrated to America in 1854. After a voyage of six weeks and three days, they arrived in New York City on the 4th of July, and from this point they went to near Buffalo, N.Y., and engaged in farming. Having acquaintances in Pulaski County, Ind., the family removed to this place in 1856, settled in Salem Township, engaged actively in farming and stock-raising, and there both parents yet reside. John Kruger was reared to manhood chiefly in Pulaski County. He attended the public schools and assisted his parents on the farm in youth, and at the age of twenty-five years married Miss Sophia Miller, daughter of Christian Miller, of Cass Township. Mr. Kruger engaged in agricultural pursuits in Salem Township, until 1880, when he was chosen by the Greenback party as their candidate for Sheriff of Pulaski County. He was elected, with a majority of 304 votes, and served two years with excellent satisfaction to all parties. In 1882, he was re-nominated by his party for this position, and was also nominated for the same office by the Democratic party. His majority at this election was 1,076 votes, and his term of office will not expire until August, 1885. Mr. Kruger is one of the popular and wide-awake citizens of the county. He is a member of the Blue Lodge in Masonry, and he and wife are the parents of four children - Frank, John, Charley and William. Besides property in Winamac, Mr. Kruger owns a farm of 340 acres in Salem Township.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - City of Winamac" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


DR. STEPHEN I. BROWN was born near the town of Pulaski, this county, June 17, 1848. His father, Ira Brown, was born in New Jersey October 30, 1813, and his mother, Sophia (Blew) Brown, in Franklin County, Ind., December 18, 1816. Stephen I. attended school until about sixteen years of age, when he enlisted in Company H, Forty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was with his regiment in all its engagements. He was mustered out September 12, 1865; returned home and attended school (now the normal) at Valparaiso a year, then taught two winters, and then for two terms attended the Asbury University at Greencastle. Following this he spent a year at home, and them for two years attended Wabash College at Crawfordsville. January 28, 1872, he married Emma M., daughter of Christian and Lucinda (Schlosser) Messerly, and born August 8, 1854. To this marriage have been born four children - Gracie, January 29, 1873; Arthur H., January 13, 1875; Howard C., June 11, 1880, and Lottie B., August 8, 1882. In 1872, soon after his marriage, he began reading medicine under Dr. D.F. Moss, of Pulaski; then for two years at the medical college at Indianapolis, whence he graduated in 1875. He then located in Merrillville, Lake County, where he practiced until 1882, and then moved to Medarysville, this county; he next came to Francesville, brought Dr. Loringís stock of drugs, and formed a copartnership with Dr. Mattingly. The Doctor is a Master Mason; is a Republican and an attendant of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which his wife is a member.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


DAVID M. BYERS was born in Ashland County, Ohio, January 18, 1836, and was the son of Adam and Mary (Boger) Byers. The family moved to Elkhart County, where David M. attended school, and worked on the home farm. In 1869, he moved to White County, and in about 1871 came to this township, where, March 20, 1873, he married Annie E. McKinney, daughter of James T. and Catherine H. (Keever) McKinney, and born November 21 1853. To this union there were born two children - Effie A., August 30, 1874, and May H., May 26, 1879. He at first bought 150 acres of land in this township, went to farming, and took great interest in stock-raising. In 1875, he bought forty acres adjoining the village of Francesville, and built a good frame house, into which he moved his family. In 1878, he was seized with an illness that lasted until October 13, 1881, when he expired. He was a member of Monon Lodge, No. 208, of Masons, and was buried by that body with full honors. He was also a member of the Lutheran Church, and was greatly respected by all who knew him. Mrs. Byers, with her litte ones, resides in the Francesville home, and attends the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


WILLIAM H. CONN was born in Cass County, Ind., July 10, 1849. His parents, Jesse and Sarah (Gundrum) Conn, were natives of Pennsylvania and were respectively born January 26, 1800, and March 2, 1810. The father, a farmer, came to Cass County, this State, about the year 1832; he entered land which he subsequently purchased from the Government, but soon after the birth of our subject sold and came to Winamac, this county, and started the hotel called the Conn Hotel, and also a grocery. William H. Conn attended school in winter and assisted his father in summer, until about sixteen; he then worked on a brotherís farm for some years, and then with his brother John went to La Crosse, La Porte County, and started a hotel; he next went to Xenia, Ohio, and there ran a restaurant; then returned to Winamac and farmed about a year. April 19, 1874, he married Eliza J., daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Hartelroad) Ginder, and by her became the father of three children - Cecil, born September 19, 1875, and died October 13, 1879; Lillie, born February 1, 1877, and Pearly, March 18, 1881. After his marriage, Mr. Conn again went into the restaurant business at Winamac for about two years; was then in White County for a time, and March 7, 1882, came to Francesville and rented the Commercial Hotel, which he is now successfully managing. He has been also a school teacher; was four years Township Trustee, is a member of the Royal Arcanum and is a Republican.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


PEYTON DAVISSON was born in Johnson County, Ind., June 20, 1829. His father, Hezekiah Davisson, was born in Virginia in 1780, and his mother, Hannah (Bristol) Davisson, in Kentucky, September 29, 1796. The family moved to Illinois when Peyton was quite young, where he went to school and worked on the home farm until 1848, when the family returned to Indiana and located in Jasper County. In 1856, Peyton came to this township and went into business as cabinetmaker, undertaker and dealer in household furniture at Francesville. October 18, 1860, he married Nancy Jane Comstock, who has borne him four children - Emeline, July 18, 1861; Mary C., April 2, 1867; Hettie, November 18, 1872 (now deceased), and Rosa Irena E., April 4, 1874. Mr. Davissonís grandfather was a soldier throughout the Revoluntionary war, and died at the age of one hundred and four; Hezekiah Davisson was a soldier of the war of 1812, and August 15, 1862, Peyton Davisson enlisted in Company G, Ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and fought at Perrysville, Ky., at Stone River and in various skirmishes. He was taken ill at Readyville, Tenn., and was confined in hospital nearly a year; was transferred to the invalid corps and remained with it unitl discharged, January 5, 1865; he then came home and resumed his business. He now resides on his farm, adjoining the town on the north.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


FRANCIS S. DRAKE, son of Alden and Phytinda (Reynolds) Drake, was born in New Jersey September 4, 1823. When but four years old, Francis was bound out to farmer Leverett Seymour, who sent him to school in the winters till fifteen, keeping him at work in the summers, and holding him until past twenty. June 19, 1844, he married Sarah Langworthy, who became the mother of two children - Emily E. and Julia J., an died May 7, 1851. In March, 1853, Mr. Drake moved to Ohio, where he worked in a saw mill, and at bridge-building until December 10, 1854, when he came to Francesville and engaged in carpentering for about two years. September 30, 1856, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Nathaniel and Mary (Watson) Waples, and to this union have been born six children - Ada L., June 26, 1857; Nathaniel W., April 5, 1859; Edwin L., August 9, 1860; Hester F., December 21, 1863; Millie E., January 1, 1870, and Guy B., December 14, 1875. Mr. Drake kept a hotel in the village about two years, and then purchased a small farm which he has increased to eighty acres. In 1856, he was elected Justice of the Peace, and was again elected in 1880 for four years. His grandfather, Noah Drake, was a soldier of the Revolution; his father served in the war of 1812, and Mr. Drake himself enlisted in 1862, in Company B, Eighy-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry; was at the battle of Chappell Hill, and in 1863 was discharged on account of sickness. He taught school about nine terms in District No. 5, and was the first to teach in the new house in what is now known as that district. He is an Odd Fellow and a Republican, and his wife is a member of the Free-Will Baptist Church.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


PETER J. ELDRIDGE is the son of Stephen and Dicey Eldridge, natives of Massachusetts. The parents moved to Stark County, Ohio, at an early day, where, on April 26, 1812, Peter J. was born, twin to a girl. When but two weeks old, he was adopted by a friend of the family, Mr. Peter Johnston, by whom he was educated and reared to manhood. He was apprenticed to a carpenter, and after learning the trade was married, February 14, 1831, to Catherine Traxler who bore him eight children - William, May 14, 1832; Daniel, February 15, 1834 (deceased); Henry, June 26, 1836 (deceased); Stephen, August 25, 1839; Nathan, August 28, 1841; Elizabeth J., August 7, 1843; Thomas, January 25, 1845. September 11, 1848, the mother died and was buried with a newly born boy in her arms. In 1840, Mr. Eldridge moved to Crawford County, Ind., and remained there until 1849. He then moved to Marion County, where he established a steam saw mill. September 14, 1851, he married Maria Countermass, daughter of John H. and Ann (Kint) Countermass, and to this union ten children were born - James, January 31, 1853; Peter, January 31, 1855; Lucinda, March 28, 1857; Ann, July 9, 1859 (deceased); Sarah, November 8, 1861; John, April 1, 1864; Elias, January 12, 1866; Charles, November 6, 1868; Mary, December 21, 1870, and Joseph, May 29, 1873. In 1857, Mr. Eldridge came to this township, where he had previously purchased 160 acres of wild land, and engaged in farming and in carpentering and house building. In 1875, he lost his dwelling and contents by fire. In 1876, his son Henry was killed accidentally. He and others were out to charivari a newly married couple, when the wad of a gun discharged by a nephew entered Henryís body, causing death two weeks after. Mr. E. is a Democrat and has served as School Trustee; he and wife are members of the Free-Will Baptist Church.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


STEPHEN ELDRIDGE son of Peter J. and Catherine (Traxler) Eldridge, was born in Crawford County, Ohio, August 25, 1839. He attended school there in winter and worked with his father at carpentering in summer until 1857, when they came to this township. Here Stephen continued at his trade until the war broke out, when he enlisted in Company I, Eighty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was with Gen. Thomas in all his battles to Atlanta, and was then with Sherman from Atlanta to the sea. He was mustered out at Indianapolis, and on returning home resumed his trade. December 22, 1867, he married Caroline, daughter of Nathaniel and Lucinda (Owens) Waples, and to their union were born six children - Charles M. (deceased), Princess E., Francis E., Oregon, Martha L. and Grant E. In 1867, he purchased twenty acres in Section 31, and now owns 260 acres, well improved with good dwelling, barn and other outbuildings. In 1880, he was elected School Director, which position he still holds. In politics, he is a Republican.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


JOSEPH A. ENGLE was born April 18, 1853. His father, Daniel, was born in Dearborn County, Ind., February 3, 1825, and his mother, Sylvia (Hubble) Engle, December 6, 1817; they were married in March, 1852, and came to this township about 1856, bought eighty acres, erected a cabin and went to farming. About the age of twenty, Joseph became a hunter, buyer and shipper of game. August 3, 1876, he married Julia A. Byers, daughter of Abner and Lorinda (Stewart) Byers, and to this union have been born three children - Walter M., Winnifred B. and Otto D. In 1875, he built a good house in Francesville, with a large ice house and freezer attached, capable of holding 1,000 dozen birds. This freezer is hermetically fastened, and has large galvanized iron pipes, containing ice, running through it. The birds are placed on frames set between these pipes and soon frozen and ready for market. August 12, 1878, he was shot in the left eye by a comrade, while hunting, causing the loss of its sight. Mr. Engle is First Lieutenant of the Carnahan Guard, a company of citizen soldiery; in politics, he is a Democrat of liberal views. Mrs. Engle is a member of the Presbyterian Church which he also attends.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


NELSON G. GALE is a native of Vermont and was born August 14, 1836. His father, Isaac Gale, was born in Vermont June 1, 1801; his mother, Lydia S. (Gardner) Gale, was born in Rhode Island in 1806. Nelson attended school until seventeen years old and then took a position in a jewelry store in Pittsfield, Mass., where he learned engraving, at which business he worked for some time, and then went to Kendall County, Ill., where he farmed and reared stock to some extent. He was there married, January 26, 1860, to Margaret A., daughter of William and Anna (Griffin) Haymond, who has borne him two children - Jennie L., July 30, 1863, and Lytle E., October 17, 1867. In 1875, he came to this township and purchased eighty acres of prairie land, put up a dwelling and other improvements and is now engaged in farming. Mr. Gale is a member of the Monon Lodge, No. 208, A.F. & A.M., of Francesville; his wife, daughter and self are members of the Free-Will Baptist Church, and in politics he is a Republican.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


CASPER H. GARRIGUES was born in Philadelphia July 15, 1800, and is the son of Abraham M. and Esther (Marshall) Garrigues, also natives of said city. Casper attended Westown Boarding School until fourteen, when his father moved to Germantown. There our subject attended school and assisted his father on the farm until sixteen, and then served at the plastererís trade until twenty-one, which trade he followed afterward continually. In the fall of 1831, he married Ann C., daughter of William and Sarah (Laskey) Stokes. She was born April 14, 1804, and bore her husband six children - Charles H., April 21, 1832; Elwood S., July 6, 1833 (died October 2, 1840); Marshall S., August 15, 1835; William H., July 28, 1840 (died November 4, 1847); Sarah L., September 2, 1842 (died December 7, 1880); and Esther R., December 17, 1844 (died March 4, 1858). In 1838, Mr. Garrigues moved to Circleville, Ohio, worked at his trade until April, 1857, and then came to Francesville and bought some property. December 7, 1881, Mrs. Garrigues died, a member of the Presbyterian Church, of which organization Mr. G. is also a member. Charles H. Garrigues, the eldest son, resides near his fatherís home, and is a carpenter. He came here with his father, and at the breaking-out of the late war went to Washington as a member of the Indiana Relief Society. In 1863, he returned home, and in 1864, was drafted and assigned to Company H, Seventeenth Indiana Mounted Infantry. He was appointed Hospital Steward, and served as such until the close of the war. April 21, 1868, he married Cynthia M., daughter of John C. and Mary E. (Wilhite) Brewer, who has borne him five children - Cynthia M., September 21, 1869; Casper C., February 24, 1871; John U., August 5, 1874; Sarah M., June 20, 1877; and Theodore S., October 2, 1880.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


MOSES MARIAN GORDON, M.D., Captain of Carnahan Guards, Commander of Henry S. Lane Post, and Vice President of a Soldiersí Veteran Association, was born in Butler County, Ohio, May 13, 1837, and is the son of William and Mary (Cartwright) Gordon, who settled in Cass County, this State, in 1841, and moved thence to this county in 1857. Dr. Gordon was reared a salesman at Georgetown, Ind.. At the age of twenty-one, he attended the normal school at Kokomo; remained for two years, and left as a teacher. At the breaking-out of the war, he helped raise the first company from Howard County - County E, Thirteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was elected Orderly Sergeant, and reached the rank of First Lieutenant; was then assigned to the Quartermasterís Department; was at times Aid-de-Camp to Gen. R.S. Foster, and took part in all the engagements and skirmishes in which his regiment participated, and at the battle of Chester Station had one horse shot under him, and was also wounded in the breast. On his return, he engaged in the mercantile business up to 1880, and then resumed the practice of medicine. He is a graduate of the Keokuk Medical College and of the Indiana Medical Department of Butler University. In 1871, he went to Rulo, Neb., where he held several civil offices, and acted as physician to the Iowa Sac and Fox Indians. He returned to Pulaski County in 1875. He is now County Physician for the Poor. He was married, May 17, 1865, to Miss Emma A. Johnson, daughter of Capt. John H. Johnson, of Spencer, Ind., and to this union have been born five children, viz.: Rosa Marian, May 25, 1866; Byron B.L., April 17, 1869; William J.B., July 24, 1870; Melville Morton, September 28, 1877; Daisey Blanch, November 22, 1879. The Doctor has taken five degrees in Odd Fellowship, and is also a member of the M.E. Church.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Salem Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


Deb Murray