JEREMIAH MATTIX was born in Marion County, Ohio, February 3, 1840, and is one of the ten children born to Benjamin and Lydia A. (Boston) Mattix, natives respectively of Ohio and Maryland, and of Welsh and German descent. In the fall of 1846, Benjamin Mattix sold his farm in Ohio, and moved with his family to this township, entered forty acres of land in this and forty in White County, built a cabin (which is still standing), and here died in March, 1864. His widow is still living, and is a member of the Christian Church. Jeremiah Mattix, at the age of twenty-one, quit the old home, and went to farming on shares during the summers, and hunting and trapping in the winters, for six years. In 1867, he bought the interest of the other heirs in a part of the homestead, and increased it to 230 acres, on which he still resides. He continues to hunt at the proper season, and is considered one of the best shots in the country. In February, 1865, he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Fifty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until September 28 of the same year. He was married, October 31, 1868, to Orpha J., daughter of Nathan and Sarah (Chew) Bailey, natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, and of Welsh-Irish and Scotch descent. Mr. and Mrs. Mattix are the parents of five children, all living. Mrs. Mattix is a member of the German Baptist Church, and in politics Mr. Mattix is a Republican.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


WILLIAM A. OYLER, M.D., was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, April 19, 1849, and is the third of the twelve children born to Jacob and Rachel A. (Williams) Oyler, natives respectively of Kentucky and Ohio, and of German and English descent. Jacob Oyler moved to Darke County, Ohio, while he was yet a young man, and was there married. In 1856, he came to Miami County, this State, where he served for eight years as Justice of the Peace, and in 1869 moved to St. Clair County, Mo.; the following year he removed to Grundy county, Mo., where he still resides on his farm of 340 acres. William A. Oyler attended school and assisted on the home farm until twenty-one years of age; in 1871, he began reading medicine with Dr. S.F. Landrey, of Galveston, Ind.; he then studied under Dr. O.C. Irvin, of Bunker Hill, and in the class of 1880-81 graduated from the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis. In 1881, he came to Pulaski, this county, where he is fast acquiring a renumerative practice. He was married, September 18, 1870, to Catherine Galbraith, a native of Pennsylvania, who has borne him six children, of whom one boy and four girls are still living. In politics, the Doctor is a Democrat, and both he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


C.R. PARCEL was born in Marion County, Ohio, January 5, 1828, and was the second of six children born to William D. and Harriet (Humphrey) Parcel, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Connecticut. William D. Parcel was married in Marion County, Ohio, and at Caledonia (which town was laid out by his father), in connection with a brother, owned and operated a saw mill, grist mill, carding mill, distillery and blacksmith shop, besides two large farms. In 1842, Mr. Parcel sold out his interests in Ohio, removed to Cass County, Ind., remained two years, and then came to this township, bought 200 acres, and farmed until his death in the fall of 1871. C.R. Parcel worked with his father until seventeen years old, and then worked at various points until the spring of 1848, when he enlisted in the Second United State Infantry, in Ohio, but was claimed as a minor by his father the same year. He returned to this county, where he has since worked at his trade, and been engaged in farming. In the spring of 1881, he purchased his present farm of eighty acres. In 1849, he was married to Mary E. Wages, a native of Maryland. Thirteen children were born to this union, eight still living. Mr. Parcel is a member of the I.O.O.F., and a P.G. of Star City Lodge, No. 442. In politics, he is a Democrat, and has filled the position of County Commissioner.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


AMOS PLOTNER was born in Marion County, Ohio, August 25, 1839, and is one of the five children born to John and Judith (Reeser) Plotner, both natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. In about 1833, John Plotner moved to Marion County, Ohio, bought eighty acres of land, developed a farm, increased it to 160 acres, and in 1851 sold and came to this township, where he purchased a partially improved farm of 280 acres, and here he died February 5, 1854, a member of the Lutheran Church. Mrs. Judith Plotner, a member of the German Reformed Church, died August 24, 1874. Amos Plotner, although he received but the ordinary education obtainable at the log schoolhouses of his youthful days, is a gentleman of extensive reading, and is well informed on all current topics. He was the only heir to the homestead, on which he still resides, and which he has increased to 560 acres. He was married, in 1860, to Lucy A. Gemberling, a native of this township, and to this union have been born nine children, of whom five are living. Mr. and Mrs. Plotner are members of the German Reformed Church. Mr. Plotner is a Democrat, and for two years served as Township Trustee.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


MICHAEL RUFF was born in Seneca County, Ohio, August 8, 1840, and is the third of a family of eight children born to Jacob and Magdalena (Daudinger) Ruff, natives of Lorraine, France. Michael Ruff was brought to this township an infant, by his parents, in the fall of 1840; for two years after becoming of age he worked for his father, receiving $150 and $200 for his services; he then worked a part of his fatherís farm on shares for two years, and then moved on a farm of 162 acres, given to him by his father. This farm he has thoroughly improved and increased to 490 acres, and he is now admitted to be the most extensive wheat-grower in the township. In February, 1867, he married Sophronia Stagmyre, a native of Seneca County, Ohio, and daughter of Maurice and Magdalena (Senn) Stagmyre, natives of Switzerland. Mrs. Ruff became the mother of two children (both deceased) and died September 2, 1868. May 5, 1870, Mr. Ruff married Elizabeth Stagmyre, a native of this county, and a sister of his former wife, and to this union have been born four children, all living. In February, 1865, Mr. Ruff enlisted in Company E, Twelfth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, and served till the close of the war, being discharged in June of the same year. In politics, Mr. Ruff is a Democrat, and both he and wife are members of the Catholic Church.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


L. RUFF was born in this township April 29, 1842, and is one of eight children born to Jacob and Magdalena (Daudinger) Ruff, native of Lorraine, France. In 1834, Jacob Ruff, who was a weaver, came to the United States with his wife and child, bought a small farm in Seneca county, Ohio, and there resided until 1840, when he came to this township and cleared eighty acres, which he had entered the previous year. To this farm he added, from time to time, until at his death, February 14, 1877, he owned 600 acres of well-improved land. He gave each of his children a good farm or its equivalent, and died a consistent member of the Catholic Church. Laurence Ruff received the ordinary education of the frontier, and assisted on his fatherís farm until the fall of 1861, when he enlisted in Company I, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until the fall of 1864, when he received an honorable discharge and returned home, having fought at Port Gibson, Championís Hill, the siege of Vicksburg, and in all the other engagements of his regiment. He then engaged in farming and stock-raising, but made his home with his father for eleven years; he next lived on his brotherís farm, and in the spring of 1879, returned to the homestead and took care of his mother until her death, September 9, of the same year. April 18, 1876, he married Anna Ryne, a native of Carroll County, Ind., and to this union there have been born four children, of who three are living - Maggie, William and Julia. Mr. Ruff is now living on and is the owner of the old homestead. Although acting with the Democratic party, he is no office seeker.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


JOHN SENN, Sr., was born in Switzerland May 16, 1808, and is the eldest of the eleven children born to Michael and Neuperga (Shiverly) Senn. Michael was a farmer and a wine-grower, and for a time served in the Swiss Army. In 1837, he brought his family to America and settled in Seneca County, Ohio, and there ended his days in 1839. His object in coming to the United States was to secure land for his children, and at his death gave John Senn, Sr., the money to purchase estates for them all. In 1838, John, Sr., came to what is now Indian Creek Township, located some 400 or 500 acres, which he bid off at the land sale at LaPorte in December of the same year. Michael and his wife were both members of the Catholic Church, and in this faith the latter died in White County, Ind., in 1857. John Senn, Sr., received a fair education in Switzerland, and after coming to America learned the carpenterís trade of a brother-in-law in Seneca County, Ohio, and followed the business for about sixteen years. He was married in Seneca County, in 1841, to Catharine Wagner, a native of France, who bore him two children - Catharine, now Mrs. Peter Buchman, and John Senn, Jr. In 1844, he came to this township and bought more land, but remained only a few months. In 1848, however, to took up his permanent home here, and built a log house and improved a portion of his land. John Senn, Jr., resides with his parents on the homestead, but owns a well improved farm of 300 acres adjoining. He began life for himself at the age of twenty-seven, and was married February 17, 1871, to Margaret Meyers, a native of Seneca County, Ohio, and of German descent. Three sons and two daughters have blessed this union, and the family are all members of the Catholic Church. In politics, Mr. Senn is a Democrat.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


A.G. SHANK is a native of Germany, was born January 27, 1846, and is one of the four children of Charles and Elizabeth (Cline) Shank. In 1851, Charles Shank brought his family to the United States and settled in Beaver Township, this county, entering eighty acres, erecting a cabin and developing a farm. A.G. Shank was employed at home until his majority, when he went to work by the month. Two years later, he engaged in dealing in live stock, and for six years met with decided success. In 1875, he engaged in the saloon business at Pulaski; in March, 1882, he sold out and again engaged in the live stock trade. He was married, October 12, 1873, to Susana Weaver, a native of this township, and this union has been blessed with four children, two boys and two girls. Mr. Shank is a Democrat, and in the spring of 1882 was elected Township Assessor. He is owner of an eighty-acre farm adjoining the village of Pulaski, besides some eighteen or twenty village lots and a handsome residence. Mr. Shankís father and mother are members of the Catholic Church, as are also Mr. Shank and wife.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


HENRY STRATTON was born in Wayne County, Ohio, August 6, 1838, and is the eldest of the four children born to William and Barbara (Hicks) Stratton, native respectively of New Jersey and of Holland. Henry Stratton, during his boyhood, received but three monthsí schooling, but has succeeded in acquiring a fair education through his own exertions. August 2, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, Forty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served until June 21, 1862, when he was discharged on account of disability. He still entertains a deep regard for the officers of his regiment. In May, 1864, he re-enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Forty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; served as Third Sergeant in the Army of the Potomac, and was mustered out in August, 1864. For several years afterward, he worked in Wyandot County by the month, and in 1868 moved to Steuben County, Ind., where he worked as before. In 1878, he came to this township, and here he has since made his home. In 1870, he married Rizpah C. Ireland, a native of Michigan, who bore him three children (two yet living) and died in 1875. January 28, 1877, he married Mary B., daughter of Frederick and Margaret Reap, and a native of this township. To this marriage there have been born two children. Mr. Stratton is a Republican and is and enterprising farmer.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


JOHN S. THOMPSON was born in Wood County, Ohio, June 3, 1830, and is one of the seven children of Moses and Sarah (Scott) Thompson, natives respectively of Virginia and Kentucky, and of English and Scotch descent. In 1824, Moses Thompson settled on a large tract of land in Wood County, Ohio, then a wilderness, and there engaged in farming and millwrighting until his death in 1833. Six years later, John S. Thompson, then nine years old, came with a younger sister to Cass County, Ind., where the two made their home with an elder sister. In the spring of 1849, John S. began driving mules on the Wabash and Erie Canal, and in the fall of the same year went to live with a brother-in-law, William Dodd, at Napoleon, Ohio. In 1850, Mr. Dodd was elected Sheriff of Henry County, and under him Mr. Thompson served as Deputy two years. In the spring of 1854, he moved to Logansport, In., clerked in a dry goods store two years, and then in a general store at Middle Fork two years longer. He then returned to Napoleon, clerked a year, and then clerked in Logansport until May, 1864, when he came to Pulaski, this county, and opened a general store in company with J.F. Taylor. In 1868, he bought Mr. Taylorís interest and conducted the business alone until 1874, when he was elected Treasurer of Pulaski County, and re-elected in 1876. From 1879 till 1881, he was Cashier of the Winamac Bank. He then retired to his farm of 600 acres near Pulaski, and engaged in agricultural and stock-raising. In April, 1882, he purchased A.A. Butlerís stock of general merchandise at Pulaski, and is now conducting that business. In 1871, Mr. Thompson married Rebecca Ent, a native of New Jersey, who has borne him four children, of whom two are still living.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


JOHN M. WARD, M.D., was born in Harrison Township, this county, July 28, 1852, and is the second of a family of seven children born to G.S. and Love J. (Doud) Ward, natives respectively of Ohio and New York. In 1828, at the age of seven years, G.S. Ward was taken by his parents to Logansport, Ind., where his father, Samuel Ward, was engaged as a contractor on the Wabash & Erie Canal. In 1839, the family came to what is now Harrison Township, this county, where Samuel Ward pre-empted 200 acres of land, for which he later obtained a patent. While still a young man, G.S. Ward purchased eighty acres adjoining the old homestead, which he cleared up and on which he still resides. He was married in 1850; is a member of the Christian Church, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. John M. Ward, after a preliminary course of instruction in the common and high schools of the county, took a three yearsí course at the Union Christian College at Merom, Ind., teaching during the interval nine terms of school of an average of five months each. In 1878, he began the study of medicine with Drs. W.H. and G.W. Thompson, of Winamac. In the class of 1881-82, he graduated from the Medical College of Indiana at Indianapolis; he then entered into practice at Pulaski, in company with Dr. C.N. Huston. November 14, 1882, he bought out the interest of D.W. Goble in the drug store at Pulaski, and the business is now conducted under the firm name of Huston & Ward. Dr. Ward was married, March 7, 1882, to Miss Ella M. Condon, a native of Morrow County, Ohio. In politics, the Doctor is a Republican.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


MOSES L. WASHBURN, one of the earliest pioneers of this township, was born in Brown County, Ohio, April 2, 1815, and is one of the eleven children of Isaac and Rachel (Laycock) Washburn, natives respectively of Kentucky and Virginia, and of German descent. While yet a young man, Isaac Washburn settled in the wilderness of Brown County, Ohio, where he bought and improved 117 acres of land, on which he resided until his death in 1828. He had served his country, in its war with England, from the early part of 1813 until peace was declared, and his father, George Washburn, served all through the Revoluntionary struggle. The latter was also a comrade of Daniel Boone in the settlement of Kentucky. Isaac Washburn, at the time of his death, was a member of the Baptist Church; his widow, a member of the same church, is a resident of Star City, this county, and is in her ninety-seventh year. Moses L. Washburn was educated in the pioneer schools of Ohio, and in July, 1833, moved with his mother and step-father to Cass County, Ind. After his majority, he worked out by the month for two years, and then purchased 160 acres of wild land in Cass County, which he improved somewhat and then sold. On the 27th of June, 1838, he arrived in what is now Indian Creek Township, Pulaski County, Ind., bought 160 acres at the land sale at LaPorte the following December, and with the help of his friends and neighbors, some of whom came from as far as Logansport, put up a rude log cabin, and here he has since resided, with the exception of twelve years, from 1851 to 1864, passed in Cass County, this State. He now owns 420 acres of well-improved land. He was first married, March 23, 1837, to Susanna Brown, a native of Preble County, Oho, who bore him four children, three yet living, and died September 5, 1859, a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. His second marriage, September 11, 1860, was to Marilla A. McGovney, a native of West Union, Ohio. Four boys and three girls have blessed this union, and all are living. Mr. W. once served as Justice of the Peace of Beaver Township, which then included Indian Creek; he was afterward County Commissioner for three years, and for six years Township Trustee. In politics, he is a Democrat, and both he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


JAMES D. WATTS was born in Cass County, Ind., October 30, 1839, and is one of the nine children born to William P. and Elizabeth (Daily) Watts, natives of Indiana and Virginia. At the age of seventeen, William P. Watts accompanied his parents to Cass County, and at the age of eighteen was there married. After his fatherís death, he bought the home place, on which he still resides. His wife died September, 1875, a member of the Christian Church, of which sect Mr. Watts is also a member. James D. Watts, until twenty-two years of age, lived with his father; he then bought a forty-acre farm in Cass County, on which he resided three years; then sold out and bought another, and then, in 1869, again sold out and came to this township, where he bought 120 acres, on which he now lives. He was married, March 2, 1862, to Sarah Ross, a native of Brown County, Ohio. To this union there were born ten children, of whom seven are yet living. Mrs. Watts is a member of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Watts is a member of the National party.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


MILTON H. WILLIAMS is the youngest of seven children born to Joseph and Rachel (Haniman) Williams, and was born in Hamilton County, Ind., June 7, 1832. Both his grandfathers were killed by the Indians near Chillicothe, Ohio, in the wars of the frontier, and his father, Joseph Williams, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was with Gen. Hull at the time of his surrender to the enemy. Joseph was married in Ohio, but a few years after the war moved to Hamilton County, Ind., then an unbroken wilderness, developed a farm, and there died in 1837. His widow and three of the children died of cholera in 1850. Milton H. Williams, after his fatherís death, lived with his brother-in-law until eighteen. He then worked three summers in the Tippecanoe Iron Forge in Fulton County, Ind., and then, in 1853, came to this township, where he bought a partially improved farm of 100 acres, on which he still resides and which he has increased to 180 acres. He was married, October 25, 1860, to Sophronia Goble, a native of Henry County, Ind., and to this union have been born seven children, of whom but three are still living. In politics, Mr. Williams is a Republican, and has never missed a vote since he became of age.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


WILLIAM H. WISELEY was born in Cass County, Ind., June 3, 1850. His father, Henry Wisely, was a native of Oho, and in 1836, while yet a young man, came to Cass County, this State, where he entered 400 or 500 acres of land, and developed a farm. He was twice married, first in Ohio to Catharine Kistler, a native of that State, who died without issue; secondly, in Cass County, Ind., to Mary C. Wolley, who bore him nine children, of whom William H. is the second. She died at her home in Cass County, August 31, 1882, he husband following on the 18th of November in the same year. Henry Wisely was a prominent Mason, and on a part of his original land entry in Cass County the town of Royal Center was laid out, to which he subsequently made an addition. William H. Wisely lived with his father until 1872, when he came to this township, and settled on sixty acres of land, and farmed for three years, keeping bachelorís hall in a log cabin. In 1875, he moved upon 100 acres of wild land which his father had given him, and here erected a frame house, and placed the soil under cultivation. He was married, September 23, 1875, to Sarah J. Hawkins, a native of Fulton County, Ind., and this lady has borne him two children - Charles F. and William E. In politics, Mr. Wisely affiliates with the National party.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


JOHN U. WITTMER was born in Switzerland June 21, 1820, and is the youngest of six children of Philip and Anna (Nendlist) Wittmer, also natives of Switzerland. John U. Wittmer received a fair education in his native land, and at the age of eighteen was apprenticed for two years at blacksmithing. In 1840, he entered the Swiss Army, and served until 1856, participating in the Swiss rebellion of 1847. In 1856, he emigrated to the United States, leaving his wife and family behind. He at first halted at Buffalo, N.Y., where he worked at his trade for a time; then went to Fremont, Ohio, and thence to Logansport, Ind., where he followed his trade for six months. In August, 1858, he came to Pulaski, this township, where he opened a blacksmith shop, which he still conducts. In 1860, he returned to Switzerland for his family, but found that his wife had died during his absence. He returned in May of the same year, bringing with him his son and daughter. In 1861, he married Catherine Camersink, a native of Switzerland, who has borne him one son - Frank A. Mr. and Mrs. Wittmer are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


J.P. WOOD was born in Covington, Ohio, June 6, 1833, and is the eldest of the nine children of Jacob and Nancy (Bartmess) Wood, natives of Virginia and Maryland, and of French and Holland descent. Jacob Wood was a harness-maker, and in 1828 settled in Montgomery County, Ohio, where he was married. He next moved to Covington, carried on his trade, and about 1840 moved to New Harrison, Ohio, where he engaged in general mercantile trade, in connection with harness-making. From 1847 to 1856, he bought farms in Darke County, aggregating 700 acres, and added farming to his other business, and also engaged in real estate transactions, purchasing large tracts of tax lands. In 1856, he sold out his business in New Harrison, and removed to Hill Grove, where he conducted the same line of business until 1860, when he again sold out, and also disposed of a part of his Ohio land; and came to Jasper County, Ind.; bought 320 acres of land, and added thereto until he was owner of over 700 acres, and here he devoted his entire attention to farming and stock-rearing. In 1868, he traded a part of his Jasper County property for the flouring-mill at Pulaski, this township. He moved here in 1869, and in 1870 erected a store building, and engaged in general merchandising, in connection with milling, which he continued until his death, October 6, 1876. About the time of his marriage he joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which for many years he was a local preacher; for several years also he was Postmaster, both in Ohio and Indiana. J.P. Wood learned harness-making of his father, and followed the trade for a number of years. In 1855, he went to Butler County, Iowa, bought 400 acres, erected a board shanty, and improved the farm until the fall of 1869, when he came to Pulaski, this township, and opened a harness-shop. In 1870, he and his brother David purchased the stock in their fatherís grist mill, and operated the mill, under rent, until 1875, when they bought the building and eighteen acres of land adjoining. In 1877, J.P. bought his brotherís interest, and now operates the mill on his own account. June 25, 1856, Mr. Wood married Miss Martha J. Epperson, of Crawford County, Ind., who has borne him eight children, seven yet living.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - Indian Creek Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


ISAAC F. BIGGS was born in Harrison County, Ind., January 27, 1826, and is one of the fourteen children of Robert and Rebecca (Sands) Biggs, named as follows: William, Matilda, Mary, Lavina, Elizabeth, Robert, Harrison, Lucinda, Rebecca, John, Isaac, Martha, Sarah and Adaline; of these, William, Rebecca, John, Isaac and Sarah only are living. The father was born in 1787 to 1788 in Pennsylvania; he was one of the first settlers in Southern Indiana; was Justice of the Peace in Harrison County for many years; was Doorkeeper for the first General Assembly of Indiana; fought under Gen. Harrison and was wounded. He died in Harrison County in 1868. Isaac F. farmed in Harrison until 1869; lived in Starke County about five years; then for eight years in Jasper County. In the fall of 1882, he came to Medarysville for the purpose of conducting a hotel that he had purchased in 1879. This is a most commodious building, is a two-story frame, and only a few steps from the depot. Mr. Biggs was a Justice of the Peace in Harrison County for four years. He was married, March 4, 1847, to Sarah Bowling, who has given birth to thirteen children; the living are named Edward, Martha, Daniel, Robert, John, Lewis, Alice, Charles, Ida, Morris, Fanny and Marshall. Mr. Biggs is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Methodist Church. He is affable and accommodating, and is well fitted for his present business.

"Counties of White and Pulaski Counties, Indiana - White Post Township" by F.A. Battey & Co. - published in 1883


Deb Murray