HARRIS TOWNSHIP

This township lies in the extreme northeastern part of the county. It is bounded upon the north by Cass county, Mich., on the east by Elkhart county, Ind., on the south by Penn township, and on the west by Clay. There is much marsh land in the township, being in the middle and southeastern part, and running a southwest course into and through the northwest corner of Penn township.

This land is unfit for agricultural purposes, except for grazing and haying. The State cut a ditch commencing at the south edge of J. Baldwin's farm on section 17, and running a south course about 160 rods, then turning southwest, which course it pursues through sections 20, 19, 30, 25, 26 and along the south line of the last named section, and also about 50 rods on the south line of section 27, where it takes a southwest course into and through Penn township. Great good has been accomplished, as this marsh was entirely covered with one continuous sheet of water, that lay upon the ground until late in the summer months, even after the abatement of the water, great portions of which was so boggy that it was inaccessible by man or beast; but this ditch has so drained this vast area that it has become solid footing, and hundreds of acres are mowed. Notre Dame University owns the largest farm in this township, most of which is marsh land, where they raise their beef and their milk supply for the University, of which further mention is made elsewhere.

This township took its name from Jacob Harris, of Ohio, who came in 1830 and settled on Harris Prairie, where he raised the first wheat that was cut in the township, it being harvested in 1831. His neighbor, Jacob Meyer, who came the spring of 1831 and still resides in this township, on section 15, helped cut Mr. Harris' crop. Samuel Bell, a son-in-law of Mr. Harris, came with him in 1830. Adam Mil1er, a Baptist preacher, came in 1830 or '31, also Adam Ringle, and settled on section 15. Mr. Ringle died several years ago, and Miller either died or moved away. The first settlers erected cabins on this prairie.

David and Josephus Baldwin and family were probably the first settlers in this township, though other historians speak of Mr. Harris being the first. Mr. Baldwin stated that he was here when Mr. Harris came, and said he and his brother David came in 1828 or '29. Joseph Buel came in 1831 and settled on section 15. Arbogast Zaehnle came in 1834, and settled on section 22, where he still resides. Henry Augustine put in his appearance on section 15 in 1831; also Hartzel, the same year, on the same section. Robert Kennedy arrived in 1833 and built his cabin on section H. David Ringle and his sons Samuel and Levi came in 1833 or '34 and pitched their cabins on section 14.

The first school-house was a log structure built on section 10, on the north edge of Harris Prairie. Though struggling through the pressure of poverty and privations, the settlers planted among them the school-house at the earliest practical period. An object so important as the education of their children they did not defer until they could build more comely and convenient houses; they were for a time content with such as corresponded with their rude dwellings; but soon better buildings were erected. As may readily be supposed, the accommodations of the earliest schools were not good. Stoves and the latest improved heating apparatuses were unknown. The house was built of rol1ed logs, 14x16 feet; cracks chinked and daubed with mud; door in the south end and a mud and stick chimney in the other; with earthen earth and fire-place wide enough to take in a log nearly as long as the width of the house, and smaller wood was used to ignite the larger; logs better known by the old pioneers as "back logs." This rudely constructed chimney and fire place served for warming purposes in winter and a kind of conservatory in summer. For windows part of a log was cut out in either side and a few lights of eight by ten glass set in. Their writing benches were made of wide split pieces of timber puncheons, resting on pins or arms driven into two inch-auger holes bored into the logs beneath the windows. The seats were made out of the same material; also the floor. The ceiling was of round pole, or logs, and covered or plastered with mud on top.

Everything was rude and plain, but many of America's greatest men have gone ant from just such school-houses to grapple with the world, and make names for themselves, and have come to be an honor to their country.

Robert Kennedy taught the first school in the township, that being in such a house as just described. The first church built was the Presbyterian, which stands in the woods near Mr. Kennedy's residence. There is but one other church, and that is owned by the Evangelical people. It is situated on the east side of section 21. The Christian Church was organized Jan. 7, 1863, by Elder Green, consisting of 31 members. The Church has been prosperous. Many of its members have moved to the West, and in consequence its membership is but a few more than when it was first organized. Its present minister is Charles Hendershot, who holds service once in two weeks. Present deacons are Robert Savage and James Lowry . They occupy the Presbyterian building. They contemplate erecting a house of worship as soon as they can secure a suitable site. This portion is not affected by the marsh, is in fair state of cultivation, and at no distant day the marsh will become tillable and settled by an enterprising people, at which time it will compare favorably with other townships that are settled with more wealthy citizens today.

The Grand Trunk railroad passes through this township, running a northeast course. There is no town upon this line in this township, nothing but a station, where there are a depot and postoffice, called Granger; no business of any kind is done.

The Indian trail leading from La Porte, or rather from Chicago to Detroit, passes through the southeast corner; Mr. W. and E. M. Irvin and Jas. Lowry, extensive farmers, settled here in an early day. .

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Harris Township


Geo. Hassig, a native of Strasburg, France, born Nov. 17, 1808; was a son of John and Barbara Hassig; he was reared on the farm, and came to America in 1832; stayed three days in New York city; then came to Stark county, O., and in 1837, to this county. He returned to Ohio in 1839, and came back the same year. He married Mary Keiffer in 1840; 5 of their 7 children are living, to wit: Napoleon, Franklin, Emanuel, Israel and Mary. Mr. H. owns 212 acres of land; is a farmer and stock-raiser in Harris tp., sec. 16. P.O., Edwards.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Harris Township


John Koker, farmer and stock-raiser, sec..22; was born in Switzerland January, 1802, and is the son of Benedict and Mary Koker; he came to America in 1824, and located in Ohio, where he resided until 1846, then came to this county, settling in Clay tp., thence to this tp. in 1847. He married in 1825, Mary Becher, a native of Switzerland; 3 of their 5 children are living. He has had good success, having 80 acres of land that he has been offered $5,200 for. Mrs. Koker died Dec. 31, 1879. Mr. K. is a member of the Presbyterian Church. P.O., South Bend.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Harris Township


Joseph L. Krupp was born in Germany Jan. 1, 1817, and is a son of Charles and Catharine Krupp, who removed to Seneca county, O., in 1833. He came to this county in 1839, and worked for several years at the blacksmith trade here and in Michigan. He was married in 1842 to Miss Sophia Smith; they have had 4 children: Eliza A., John, Mary and Louisa. Mrs. K. died October, 1851, and in 1853 Mr. K. married Miss Susan Long, by whom he had 5 children; 4 are living: William, Perry, Clayton and Philo. He is engaged in farming and stock-raising on sec. 9, Harris tp., and owns 440 acres of land.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Harris Township


Jacob Meyer was born in France July 17, 1807; son of Jacob and Mary Meyer, also natives of France, who came to America in 1828, and to this county soon after. Jacob came to this county in 1831, and settled on the present farm. He married Miss Catharine Bueb in 1829, who was born in September, 1807; they have had 11 children, 9 of whom are living, to-wit: Francis, Mary, Gracie, Jacob, Caroline, Joseph, Josephine, Clara and Sophia. Mr. Meyer commenced in life by working on the canal; his first purchase of land was 160 acres, and at present owns 460 acres of beautiful land. He has held the office of Trustee and is a member of the Masonic order. His son Joseph was born July 26, 1843, in this county; he married Miss Minerva Smith January, 1870, and they have 3 children, to-wit: Pliny E., Thomas A. and Henry E. Mrs. M. died April 26, 1873. He married Miss Helen Smith Sept. 15, 1874, who was born Sept. 30, 1853; their 2 children are Harry and Arthur. Mr. M. owns 21 acres of land, and is superintending his father's farm of 460 acres in Harris tp., sec. 15. P.O., South Bend.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Harris Township


Christ. Schneck was born July 10, 1825, in Germany, and is the son of Adam and Margaret Schneck, now deceased. He left his native land in 1853; took passage in one of the New York steamships, and had a pleasant trip to New York, where he remained a short time, and then took up his march westward, stopping at Toledo; he located in Berrien county, Mich., in 1854, where he resided six years, then came to this tp., where he has been engaged in farming and stock-raising. In 1856 he married Miss Dora Streveal, a native of Germany, born in 1833, and came to America in 1851. Their 9 children are Caroline, Christine, Mary, Lydia, David, Emma, Mattie, Elizabeth and Ida. Mr. S. has been successful thus far through life, now owning 93 acres of good farming land on sec. 9; he and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church. P.O., Edwards.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Harris Township


John M. Shimp was born Jan. 18, 1848, in this county, and is a son of Jacob and Hannah Shimp, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter of Ohio, who came to this county in an early day. John was reared on the farm, and received a good education, attending college two terms. He married Miss Sarah J. Longley March 16, 1870; she was born in Elkhart county, this State, April 15, 1849; 2 of their 3 children are living, to-wit: Delbert and Andrew. Mr. S. owns 60 acres of land, worth $65 an acre, in Harris tp., sec. 11. P. O. South Bend.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Harris Township


Michael Smith, a native of Germany, born Aug. 24, 1824, is a son of Frederick and Elizabeth Smith, who came to New York in 1826, staid there six months, then went to Buffalo and remained one year, thence to Canada, near Black Rock, where he resided three years, thence to Stark county, O., where he died. Michael was reared on the farm, received a common-school education and came to this county in 1842. He married, July, 1853, Mary E. Anderson, daughter of Samuel Anderson, who came to this county in 1836, and died in 1852. She was born Nov. 20, 1827, in Columbia county, Pa. Mr. S. owns 380 acres of valuable land in sec. 17; he also raises stock. Himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. P.O., Granger.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Harris Township


John A. Zaehnle was born in this county Jan. 7, 1843; his parents were Abogast and Rosa (Binder) Zaehnle, natives of Germany; his father came to this country in 1830, locating in Ohio, and his mother in 1832, also locating in Ohio. They were married in 1834, moved to this county the same year, and have since had 8 children, 3 of whom are living: Rosa, Samuel and John A. Mr. Z. first entered 80 acres of land, and has since added 120 acres; April 29, 1874, John A. married Theresa Schirk, who was born in Germany Sept. 18, 1849; their 4 children are Emma, Clara, Edward L. and Otto A. Mr. Z. has been Assessor ten years, and is now holding the office of Trustee the second term; he was Paymaster's Clerk in the army, and has been clerk in a wholesale house in Louisville, Ky.; he is now working on his farm of 40 acres in Harris tp., sec. 22; also works his father's farm. In 1874 he went to Germany, and when he returned, brought an aunt and the young lady whom he afterward married. After leaving the district school he entered the University of Notre Dame, where he continued three years, graduating in the commercial course. He then went to Louisville, Ky., and was Paymaster's Clerk under Major Camp, who was stationed there. Afterward he went to Bowling Green and Nashville, acting in the same capacity, under Major Fell. He then was clerk in the sutler store of C. Henry Fink, where be remained until near the close of the war, then returned to his home in this county. P. O., South Bend.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Harris Township


] LIBERTY TOWNSHIP Liberty township formerly embraced the territory included in Lincoln township, but being inconvenient for the settlers that resided in (now) Lincoln township to attend elections, in June, 1866, according to petitions of Lincoln settlers, it was detached and made an independent township. Liberty is generally known as being among the first settled townships in St. Joseph county. The first settlements were made in 1833 near North Liberty, by John Kane, John and Jacob Earhart and Isaac Townsend. But few other settlers came into the township till 1836. John Rupel came in January, this year, soon followed by David Rupel, Jas. Cole, Jacob Rupel and Joseph Liggett.

In May, 1837, the township was organized by the following persons: Danieland James Antrim, John and David Rupel, Samuel Loring, James Cole, Jacob Rupel and Joseph Liggett. The first election was held the same spring, in North Liberty, at the house of J as. P. Antrim, who was elected Justice of the Peace. In 1838 Mr. Waldsmith, father of Geo. Waldsmith, a present resident of Liberty township, settled on section 30.

Then the early settlers met with hardships the present settlers know nothing of. They had to go to Elkhart in order to get wheat or corn ground for bread, and sometimes would have to wait nearly a whole week before their turn would come, all the while their families at home subsisting on nothing but what we call "hard tack" and wild meat. The wives of the settlers shared their trying lot with great patience and boldness of spirit. Their husbands were compelled to go away from home and work, leaving home just as soon as the morn of Monday would break; go to a place ten or twelve miles distant, where he would labor all the week and not return home till the star had lit the sky on Saturday evening; and as he would plod his weary way along the Indian trail bearing a piece of fresh beef, which was a part of the fruits of his week's labors, frequently the hungry wolves would get scent of the precious meat he had, and he could hear their howling in the distance, then a little nearer and a little nearer till their incessant howls only told that they were persistently too near. Then he would be compelled to drop his meat to be devoured by the angry wolves and would have to go home at last without meat for his family. At this time the Pottawatomie Indians strolled in bands through the forests of this vicinity in search of ďBig Injun's deer,Ē which roamed in great herds through St. Joseph county. The Indians at this time were peaceable, but by their savage and warlike actions would frequently frighten the settlers' wives. At one time in mid-winter about a dozen of these red skins called at the house of Mr. Waldsmith, and he not being at home, Mrs. W. was greatly terrified. They (the Indians) would stand around the fire, and, scraping the snow off their "leggins," would ,stop and point their huge bowie knives at Mrs. Waldsmith's children and say, " See, dat is de white man's pappoose; de white man's pappoose." This frightened Mrs. W. almost to death and she treated them with great hospitality, with a great deal more than human nature would do under any other circumstances. She gave them food and almost everything in that line, and finally they departed, much to the joy of their benefactor. But it was only a few years before the Indians were removed westward.

In 1837 a grist mill was built in North Liberty, much to the convenience and accommodation of the settlers. In 1839 Hiram Bean and Alonzo Hill built a saw-mill not far from where the present grist-mill stands.

The land of this township, as already stated, was very thickly and heavily timbered, and it was not till about 1850 that the work of grubbing and clearing began to be faithfully prosecuted; but since that a great portion of it has been cleared up, thereby reducing to cultivation a body of land unexcelled in fertility and productiveness of all kinds of grain. The leading industrial pursuits of the settlers are farming and lumbering. Five saw-mills are actively running in the township. Live-stock rearing is fast becoming a leading feature of the industry of Liberty township.

Among the leading farmers of this township we find the names of D. W. Reece, V. S. Bulla, Henry Reamer, Jacob D. Row, A. H. Price, Ort Cook, Samuel Williams, L. Decoutres, Geo. Waldsmith, C. Schroeder, Franklin Pearce and his two sons L. S. and N. W., who are stock-raisers; N. S. Miller is a merchant and farmer; Isaac R. Cole, Jacob Geiger and Levi J. Knepp, farmers and mill sawyers.

The inhabitants of Liberty township are mostly of German ancestry, or what are called Pennsylvania Dutch, but they are a very enterprising class of people.

The only village that Liberty township contains is NORTH LIBERTY.

It is situated at the conjunction of sections 28, 29, 32 and 33, and contains a population of nearly 400. It was laid out in 1831 by Daniel and James P. Antrim, and was surveyed by T. W. Bray. No houses had yet been built on the site, but the" distant future lent enchantrnents." and soon after its location James Downey built a house; the same year four other houses were built. The first store in the place was opened by Daniel Antrim in 1837. He did business one year, then sold his stock to E. S. Reynolds, and in 1840 he sold to A. P. Richardson, who kept the store till about 1845, when James Harvey purchased the stock and started a general store. Mr. Harvey continued in business till 1867. In 1875 the Houser Brothers opened a general store. They still continue in business. In 1865 Mr. Norman S. Miller opened a large dry-goods establishment, which he continues. In 1866 Cole Brothers built a large planing mill and manufacturing establishment, which was burnt the winter of 1871. Jan. 1, 1873, a company was formed named Cole, Ragon & Co., consisting of Cole brothers, Houser and Knepp, and they built the North Liberty manufacturing establishment. They continued in business till 1875, when Houser & Knepp purchased Cole Bros. interest in the establishment and have kept it in operation.

The home manufacturing company started in business in the fall of 1873, but has since discontinued, and the machinery was purchased by Schwartz & Tischer and moved to Walkerton, where they erected a planing-mill.

The present business of North Liberty consists of two large dry-goods establishments, two boot and shoe stores, one drug and hardware store, one grocery and hardware store, one planing-mill and manufacturing establishment, one grist-mill, one millinery store, one butcher shop, one barber and four practicing physicians. There are also three churches and one school-house.

The first church in Liberty tp., was erected by the Methodists in North Liberty, in 1851, during the pastorate of Rev. A. Badley. This was used till 1878, when, during the administration of Rev. R. H. Sanders, a new and commodious structure was erected. The persons that aided principally in the founding of the Church at North Liberty in 1851, were: John Rupel (since deceased), Jas. Cole, John Quigley, Henry Reamer, Samnel Williams, Sumner G. Williams and D. W. Reece. The class-leaders of the North Liberty M. E. Church are Henry Reamer, Isaac R. Cole and Thos. Faulkner . Perhaps no other quarterly conference in Northern Indiana can boast of having sent more men from the private ranks to the active duties of the ministry, nor of men who under God have more faithfully wielded the weapons of Christian warfare, which in their hands have been mighty to "the pulling down" of "strongholds," among whom are Revs. Samuel T. Cooper, H. B. Ball, Nelson Green, James Green, Samuel Godfrey, J. C. Metsker, S. Lamb and C.W. Miller, of the North Indiana conference, and John C. Baker, of the Illinois Conference.

The second church in the township was the Seventh-Day Advent church at North Liberty, which was built in 1868 by donations from James Harvey, Elias Styles, Jacob Styles, Anson Worster, Adam Rupert and Russel Hoag, since deceased.

The Episcopalians also built a church a few years ago.

There are also five other churches outside of North Liberty, - two Dunkard churches, one Evangelical, one German Lutheran, and one United Brethren church.

The first school-house in Liberty township was erected near the site of the Dunkard chnrch, one-half mile south of the village, in 1838. It was built of logs, and had a huge fire-place in one end of the room. The windows were one sash with three lights. One was in each side of the room. In 1840 a school-houe was built in North Liberty, and in 1868 a high-school building was erected. A graded school has since been kept. Mr. J. N. Reece is the principal and George Sands is the teacher in the lower department.

North Liberty is a very pleasant little town and is surrounded with wealthy men. All the disadvantage that this. place meets with is the lack of railroad facilities; but should a railroad be constructed through this place it would become one of' the most flourishing towns in the county.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Rev. Orlando R. Beebe, son of Samuel C. and Currence B. Beebe, was born near Salem, Porter county, Ind., Sept. 25, 1843. At the tender age of three years, his father died; and thenceforward his support and training devolved upon the widowed mother. Care was taken to secure for him the benefits of a common-school education. When about 16 years of age he began the struggle for larger advantages than the common school afforded. He accordingly became a student in the Valparaiso Collegiate Institute, where he was still at work with his books, when, in Aug., 1862, he enlisted in the Marine Artillery, and was soon with his command in North Carolina, where he obtained a transfer to the 3rd N. Y. Artillery. Shortly after this transfer the troops in North Carolina were removed in large part to South Carolina, to engage in the siege of Charleston. One year from his enlistment he was discharged, and, returning home, again enlisted in an Indiana Regiment, the 138th, where he served for a little more than one hundred days and was again discharged. This was followed by a third enlistment in the 151st Ind. Infantry. Here he remained until the close of the war. After the war was over and following a year's residence in Chicago, he began business for himself in Hebron, Ind. Here he became acquainted with and married Miss Laura G. Cain, daughter of Wesley and Elizabeth Cain. As the fruit of this marriage they have 1 daughter, born Nov. 15, 1875. On the 11th of May, 1872, having already been licensed by the Hebron Quarterly Conference as a local preacher, and having closed up his business affairs at Hebron, he began work in the Methodist ministry on Marmont Circuit, Northwest Indiana Conference. At the conference held in the following September, he was re-appointed to the same work. In the following year he was appointed to the Winamac charge. After a year of labor at Winamac he became pastor at Argus, in Marshall county. From thence he removed to Wheeler in Porter county. After a three years' term at Wheeler, Union Mills, in Laporte county, became his field of labor. His next appointment brought him into this county, to North Liberty circuit, where he now lives and labors.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


V. S. Bulla was born in this county Feb. 14, 1847. His parents, W. F. and Mary Bulla, were natives of Indiana. His father was one of the first settlers in St. Joseph county. (The biography of this early pioneer appears in another place.) V. S: was reared on a farm in Clay tp., north of South Bend. He was educated in the Notre Dame schools; was married Jan. 8, 1874, to Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel and Adaline McKenzie; to them were born 2 children, viz.: Mary A. and Lore. Mr. B. owns 240 acres of land in sees. 31 and 32.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Alex. S. Campbell, M. D., physician, North Liberty, was born in Baltimore county, Md., May 3, 1828. His parents were James H. and Elizabeth (Hattan) Oampbell; he was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of the country; in 1831 he, with .his parents, moved to Zanesville, O., and in 1834, to McConnellsville, O.; remained there till 1845, then moved to Mt. Vernon, Ohio; in 1846 he went to Chesterville, O., and in 1852 went to Johnsville, and in 1855 to Iberia; in 1853 he commenced studying medicine under Drs. Henry H. Duff and T. White, of Iberia; he commenced practicing in 1857 at Iberia; and in 1860 he went to Zanesfield, where he practiced till 1870; then came to North Judson, Ind. ;.in 1871 he came to North Liberty, where he still resides, engaged in the practice of his profession. Mr. Campbell has been a member of the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical Association since 1869. He was married in 1848 to Miss Elizabeth Wilson, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Ferris) Wilson, and they have had 9 children, viz.: James M., a physician at Burlington, Iowa; Harriet L., now Mrs. Albert Liggett; Anna, now Mrs. Elias Styles; Thos. W., Emma A., now Mrs. Joseph Lucado; Wm. and Alice, twins, the latter now Mrs. Cyrus D. Houser; Amanda and Ada. Mrs. Campbell departed this life Sept. 9, 1877. Mr. Campbell was again married May 9, 1880, to Miss Sarah Gordon, daughter of John W. and Elizabeth Gordon, natives of Virginia.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Isaac R. Cole was born in Darke county, O., June 13,1833; his parents were James and Sarah Cole, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter of Pennsylvania; he came with his parents to this county in 1836, and they settled two and a half miles south of North Liberty. His father's family were among the first settlers of Liberty tp. Here on this frontier Isaac R. was reared to manhood and educated in the pioneer or frontier school, as it may be called. He was married Sept. 16, 1856, to Eliza J. Rush, daughter of Isaiah and Rebecca Rush, natives of Ohio. To this marriage was born one child, viz.: James Arthur. Mrs. Cole departed this life March 3, 1859. Mr. Cole was again married Oct. 21, 1861, to Mary E. Reamer, daughter of George and Rebecca Reamer, natives of Pennsylvania; their 3 living children are Alma A., Benj. F. and Mable B. Mr. C., in connection with his brother, owns 160 acres of land, also two saw-mills, one in Liberty tp. and the other at Crum's Point. Mr. C. also owns 102 acres more near North Liberty.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Ort Cook was born in this county Aug. 8, 1847, and is a son of the Rev. Elias and Sophia (Eberhart) Cook. He was reared on a farm, and educated in the South Bend College. His father came to this county in the early part of 1847, and was a minister of the M. E. Church. Mr. Cook was married Oct. 5, 1874, to Miss Arvilla Rupel, daughter of John Wosley and Elzada Rupel. Her father was a native of Ohio, and her mother of Indiana. Two children were born to this union, one living, viz.: Adolphus and Tutt. Mr. C.'s grandfather Cook was a soldier in the Revolution.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Isaac Early was born in Rockingham county, Va., March 7, 1838; his parents, Jacob and Mary (Summons) Early, were natives of Virginia; he went to Allen county, O., when two years old, was educated in a common school, in a log house with slab scats, stick chimney, etc. In 1865 he came to this county where he still resides, engaged in farming and stock-raising; he followed school-teaching for awhile in Ohio. He was married April 18, 1861, to Mary E. Irvin, a native of Rockingham county, Va. To them were born 8 children, viz.: Sarah M., Hattie E., Mary E., Charles E. and Ella M. (twins), Mattie A., William I. and John J. Mr. E. owns a farm of 240 acres, worth $50 per acre.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Martin Finch was born in Michigan June 19, 1836, son of Zimri and Hannah (Wright) Finch; he came to this county in 1844, and, with his parents, settled near Mishawaka; his father was a forgeman by trade and worked in the Mishawaka iron works. Martin was married Dec. 12, 1869, to Elizabeth Rupel, by whom he has had 5 children, viz.: Samuel N., Henry N., Ettie E., Ira A. and Ruth A. Mr. F. owns 91 acres of land in secs. 31 and 36.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


< a name="gflood"> Geo. R. Flood, harness-maker, keeps on hand a full stock of harness, whips, etc.; was born in Fairfield, Ind., Oct. 8, 1851, and is a son of James and Rachel E. Flood; he learned harness-making when 14 years of age, in Westville, his parents having moved there when he was young; his father was a merchant there for several years, and in 1872 Geo. R. went to Iowa, returning in 1874. In 1875 he worked at Lafayette, and in 1876 he came to North Liberty. He was married Dec. 4 of the same year, to Miss Mary E. McKenzie, daughter of D. R. and E. A. McKenzie, and they have had 2 children, viz.: Daniel It and Mabel M. Mr. Flood's grandfather on his fatherís side was born near Dublin, Ireland, and during the Irish insurrection he was compelled to flee to another "seaport," and came to the free American soil; his grandfather Best was the first white child born in Cincinnati, O.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Jacob Geiger was born in Seneca county, O., Jan, 27, 1840. His parents, Henry and Christina (Zenderfan) Geiger, were natives of Baden, Germany; they came to this country in 1825. Mr. Geiger is the 3d child and 2d son of a family of 8 children; he was reared on a farm and educated in school-houses built of slabs, and furnished with slab seats and writing desks. He left Ohio in 1863, and went to Jasper county, Ind.; and in 1865 came to this county, and has since followed farming and lumbering. In 1877 he purchased an interest in a saw-mill which he has since kept in operation. He was married Oct. 28, 1862, to Maria Shaffner, daughter of Martin and Susanna Shaffner, natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. G. have had 9 children 7 of whom are living, viz.: Theodosia, Vesta, Christiana, Madison F., Gertrude, Susanna and Ethel. Mrs. Geiger was born Feb. 8, 1843. Mr. G. owns 195 acres of land in sec. 36, also 200 acres in Marshall county.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Henry Geiger was born in Dearborn county, Ind., Feb. 14, 1849. His parents, John G. and Anna H. Geyer, were natives of Germany, and emigrated to America in the year 1840, and settled in Dearborn county where they resided till 1850, when they came to this county. Mr. G. was married Sept. 11, 1874, to Margaret A. Morrow, daughter of Andrew and Sarah Morrow, natives of Ohio. Mrs. Geyer died July 7, 1877, leaving one child. The 11th day of December following, Mr. G. married Sophia Stumble, daughter of Abram S. and Lydia Stumble; they have had one child, Chas. A. Mr. G. owns a farm of 230 acres in secs. 26 and 35, valued at $50 per acre.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


John Hawblitzel was born in Stark county, O., in the year 1833; his parents, John G. and Ann C. Hawblitzel, were natives of Germany. He came to this county in 1863; was married in 1858 to Anna O. Geiger, by whom he has had 4 children, of whom 3 are living, viz.: Nelson M., Henry G. and Anna C. Mr. H's father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and his grandfather on his father's Bide was in the Revolutionary war. He owns a farm of 144 acres.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Russel Hoag was born in New York State, Feb. 17, 1836. His parents were Russel and Mary Hoag, the former a native of New York and the latter of Rhode Island. He was reared in the town of Coalsville, N. Y., and educated in the schools of that place; he went to Michigan in 1857, and in 1868 came to this county; he was married April 2, the same year, to Miss Emma Carpenter, daughter of William and Nancy Carpenter, natives of Rhode Island. To this marriage were born 3 children, viz.: William R., Joseph H. and Myrtie Bell. Mr. Hoag was one of the founders of the Seventh Day Advent Church at North Liberty; he owns 35 acres of land near North Liberty, worth $100 per acre, and also a house and lot in the town.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


C. D. Houser, of the firm of Houser Bros., dealers in general merchandise, North Liberty, Ind.; was born Feb. 18, 1850, son of George and Lucy (Long) Houser, natives of Pennsylvania; he was reared on a farm, and educated in the Roanoke schools; followed farming till 1873, when he and his brother opened the store. He was married Sept. 22, 1878, to Alice Campbell, daughter of Dr. A. S. and Elizabeth Campbell, natives of Ohio; they have had 1 child Grace.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Daniel W. Houser, of the. firm of Houser Bros., dry-goods dealers, and also of the North Liberty Manufacturing Company, is a brother of the preceding, and was born in Coshocton county, O., Dec. 7, 1842; he was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools; he left Ohio in 1858, and came to this county, where he followed farming till he was of age, then purchased an interest in a saw-mill; he followed milling until 1868. In 1872 he with his brother opened a manufacturing establishment. Mr. H. was married Mar. 1, 18l7, to Miss Ella Briggs, daughter of William and Charlotte Briggs; to them were born 2 children, Gail E. and Eva M.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


William Inman was born Feb. 7, 1832, in Clarke county, Ohio. His parents, John and Hannah Inman, were natives of England, and came to this country about the year 1815, settling in Ohio. His educational advantages were limited to the common schools of the country; in 1838 he came with his parents to this county when all was wild and unbroken, almost equal to his native place. His father purchased 235 acres of land at the Government price ($1.25 per acre); they then moved on the land and began improving it. Our subject was married Jan. 3, 1848, to Miss Adelia Whitman, daughter of Joel and Artemisia (Hewitt) Whitman, and their 8 children are: William C., Alma V., Ann M., Frances E., John A., George M., Martha M. and Artemisia. Mr. I. owns 158 acres of land, worth $45 per acre, and is a Republican.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Levi J. Knepp was born in Ohio Jan. 7, 1835, and is a. son of John and Mary (Price) Knepp; he was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools of the country. In 1857, he came to this county, and soon after went to La Porte; here he followed his trade, carpentering, for about two years; in 1859 he returned to St. Joseph county and pursued his former vocation till 1865, when he purchased a saw mill, which was burned in about two months; he rebuilt and ran it for about four years, when it was again destroyed by fire; he replaced this with another, and has since followed milling in connection with farming. He was married Oct. 2, 1859, to Sarah Houser, daughter of George and Lucy Houser. To this marriage were born 4 children, of whom 3 are living, viz.: Jonathan D., Geo. F., Laura C. and Schuyler W. (dec.).

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Elijah T. Lee, blacksmith and wagon-maker, North Liberty; was born in Wythe county, Va., Dec. 5, 1829; his parents, Martin and Mary Lee, were natives of Virginia; he lived on a farm till he was seventeen, then learned the blacksmith trade. In 1842 he went to Noble county, and worked at his trade till 1854, when he went to La Porte; he followed his trade there till the war broke out; he enlisted in the military service Aug. 9, 1862, in Co. E, 4th Ind. Cavalry, and served in that capacity till the close of the war; he participated in the battle at Mt. Washington, Ky., and at Atlanta; he employed most of his time at General Wilson's headquarters, working at his trade. He was mustered out at Edgefield, Tenn., and immediately returned to La Porte. In 18G5 he came to North Liberty, where he still resides, working at his trade. He was married in 1854, to Helen Nevins, daughter of Oscar Nevins; they have had 5 children, 4 of whom are living, viz.: Francis M., Ida Estella, Anna Laura and Mary Lizzie. Mr. Lís father was in the war of 1812.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


John A. Long. deceased, was born in Tennessee, Nov. 14,1813; was reared on it farm, and in November, 1841, he came to this county, and settled in Liberty tp. He was married Jan. 3,1839, to Miss Elizabeth Troxell, daughter of Jacob and Catharine Troxell; 9 of their children are living; viz.: Jacob, Sarah C. (now Mrs. Jacob Jemison), Lucinda (now Mrs. Adam Longacre), George Jr., Wil1iam, Francis M., Mary A. (now Mrs. Milton White), Margaret E., Benjamin A., Jonathan (dec.) and Thomas G. (dec.). Mr. Long followed the life of the honest farmer up to the time of his death, which occurred June 27, 1874. He had been a member of the German Baptist Church for fifteen years, and during this time he led a life of fidelity and uprightness, and left the earth respected by a11 and at enmity with none.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Norman S. Miller, merchant, North Liberty, was born in Darke county, O., Feb. 25, 1832; his parents were Josiah and Martha Miller, natives of Somerset county, Penn.; he was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of the country; he came to this county in the spring of 1855, with only $75 in money. He taught school three months the fo11owing winter, for which he received $105. The same year he purchased a farm of 95 acres, near North Liberty, for which he paid $1,000, a part cash and the remainder "on tick." The spring of 1859, he sold the same farm for $1,687.50, realizing a gain of $687.50. In the spring of 1860 he bought 100 acres lying in sec. 8, for which he paid $1,100, and sold the same farm in 1863 for $1,800. He then purchased 160 acres in sec. 5, paying $2,100, and in 1867 sold it for $4,100. In 1865 he entered into the mercantile business, with a stock of general merchandise invoiced at $9,000. In 1872 he purchased another farm of 160 acres, paying $3,300. Mr. Miller has held many prominent township offices . In 1857 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and served three successive terms with general acceptability. In 1869 he was elected Township Trustee, which office he filled seven years. He was married in 1855 to Miss Mary Rupel, daughter of John and Anna (Loring) Rupel To this union were born 6 children, of whom 4 are living, viz., John H., Norman E., Anna M. and Lorene. Mr. M. is Postmaster, was appointed by President Lincoln, and strongly adheres to the noblest truths of the Republican party.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Gottlieb Prell was born in Germany Oct. 10, 1827, son of Godfrey and Maria Prell; he came to this country in 1855, and settled in this county, where he has since resided engaged in farming. Mr. Prell received an excellent education in the classics in the Universities of Germany, before he emigrated to America.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


A. H. Price was born in Tuscarawas county, O., Sept. 2, 1831; his parents, Jonathan and Margaret (Deetz) Price, were natives of Pennsylvania. In 1864 he came to this county, where he has since resided, engaged in farming and stockraising. He also taught school for a term of years. Sept. 30, 1852, he married Miss Lydia A. Cordray, daughter of Nathan and Mary A. Cordray; to them were born 10 children, viz.: Mary, now wife of A. R. Freeman; Margaret E., wife of Daniel Krigger; Ella, Angeline, Lorenzo D., John F., Albert, Emma, Minerva A. and Laura. Mr Price owns a farm of 144 acres, valued at $45 per acre. He is a Democrat.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


D. W. Reece was born in Granger county, Tenn., Dec. 22, 1811, son of Charles and Mary (Glascow) Reece; he was reared on a farm, and his educational facilities were limited, having to attend school in a log school-house without floor, furnished with slab seats, greased paper for window-lights, and a huge fire-place in one end of the room. In 1832 he went to Fayette county, Ind., where he lived till 1842; about 1835 he came to this tp. and purchased a farm; he made occasional visits to his farm, remaining only for a short time, and in 1842, as already stated, he moved upon it. Apr. 26, 1838, he married Nancy M. Wilson, daughter of Jeremiah A. and Rebecca (Stubblefield) Wilson. Mr. Wilson was a very early settler in Fayette county, having moved there prior to the war of 1812, when that region was but a howling wilderness. Mr. and Mrs. R. have had 8 children; of these, 6 are living, viz.: Mary R. (now Mrs. Hugh Heaton), Sarah C. (wife of Louis De Coudres,) William, Thomas J., Martha A. (wife of John Whitinger), and James N. Mr. Reece has held various tp. offices, among which is Trustee. He and his wife are members of the M. E. Church.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Jacob D. Row was born in Tuscarawas county, O., Oct. 18,1835. His parents, David and Sarah (Allehouse) Row, were natives of Pennsylvania. He went with his parents to Coshocton county, O., where he grew to manhood. His educational advantages were limited to the common schools; he came to this county in May, 1861, and settled on sec. 36, in Liberty tp. This was then but a howling wilderness; the land was very heavily wooded. There were but about 4 acres cleared on the farm he purchased; he labored on in the wood with unceasing energy till Sept., 1864, when he was drafted into the army; he had not been in the military service long till he was taken sick, and was confined in the Cumberland hospital for about four months; he served about one year, and was honorably discharged; he then returned home and resumed his former occupation, clearing the land and farming. He was married June 30, 1860, to Miss Hannah Knepp, by whom he has had 6 children, 5 of whom are living, viz.: Wm. C., Mary J., Martin A., Albert O. and Clara A. Mrs. Row is a daughter of John and Mary (Price) Knepp, natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. Row is a veterinary surgeon and horse doctor.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


David Rupel, second permanent settler in Liberty tp., was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, July 31, 1811; his parents, Jacob and Ann Rupel, were natives of Germany, and came to America at a very early day. In 1830 he came to Elkhart county, and remained during the winter. The following spring he came to this county and located near South Bend; at that time there were but two houses in the place, and they were occupied by Taylor and Coquillard, or Cutteau, as he was known, who had a trading post with the Indians at that place. In the slimmer of 1832 the settlers built the courthouse; the material consisted chiefly of brick; in May, 1836, he moved to Liberty tp. He was married Jan. 10, 1836, to Sarah Meller, daughter of Andrew and Margaret Meller, natives of Ohio. This union was blest with 6 children, 5 of whom are living, viz.: Dennis W., Andrew M., Margaret J., (now wife of J. W. Jones), Melinda C. (wife of David H. Weaver) and Mary E. (wife of Jonathan M. Cripe). Mrs. Rupel died Feb. 21, 1815, aged 58 years.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


John N. Rupel, was born in this county Mar. 11, 1837, son of John and Anna Rupel, the former a native of Ohio, and the latter of Kentucky; he was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. He dealt in live stock for about 20 years; also followed farming. He owns a farm of 144 acres in sec. 36, valued at $50 per acre. He was married Feb. 28, 1865, to Miss Isadore Waxham, daughter of Zachariah and Elizabeth Waxham; they have 1 child, John F . Mr. R.'s father was the first settler in Liberty tp.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Charles Schroeder was born in Germany in the year 1833. His parents, Henry and Henrietta Schroeder, were also natives of Germany; he came to this country in 1857, and settled in St. Joseph county, where he still resides, engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was married in April, 1851, to Miss Mary Stieme, a native of Germany. Of their 9 children 8 are living, viz.: Frederick, Mary (Mrs. Rute Sellers), Anna, Charley, Henry, Sarah, Harmon and Ettie. Mr. S. owns 160 acres of land, worth $60 per acre.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


John W. Shuppert was born in Elkhart county, Ind., April 14, 1845; his parents, Joseph and Susanna Shuppert, were natives of Ohio. He was reared on a farm and educated in the Otterbein University, at Westerville, O., and followed school-teaching for 10 years. He was married Nov. 29, 1811, to Mary E. Weatherington, by whom he has had 5 children, viz.: Arvilla S., Archie E., Leroy, Perlia B. and Dasie A. Mrs. Shuppert is a daughter of John and Elizabeth Weatherington, natives of Connecticut. Her father was a very early settler in Franklin county, O.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Adam Smick was born in Stark county,. O., April 11, 1828. His parents, Solomon and Mary A. Smick, were natives of Pennsylvania; he was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools of the country. He came to this county in the spring of 1854, and settled in Liberty tp., where he, still resides . He was married in 1853 to Elizabeth A. Blake, by, whom he has had 5 children; of these, 3 are living, viz.: Mary J. (wife of Joseph Ollery), Sarah E. (wife of Geo. Bennett), and Elizabeth E. In 1856 Mr. S. married Miss Rebecca Steel, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Steel.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Jeremiah Steel was born in Holmes county, O., Sept. 6, 1834. His parents, Elias and Elizabeth Steel, were natives of Pennsylvania; he was reared on a farm) and educated in the Ohio Berlin Academy; came to this county in 1864, and followed farming until the year 1872, when he purchased an interest in his father's sawmill; he continued in that business till 1877, when his father died, and by the division of the property the mill fell into his possession; he still keeps it in operation. In 1867 he married Miss Catharine .A. Gearhart, daughter of Henry and Kasia Gearhart, and they have had 7 children, of whom 4 are now living- viz.: Franklin E., Henry E., Joseph and Elmira. Mr. S. owns a farm of 380 acres.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


J. A. Varier, M. D., physician and surgeon, North Liberty; born in this county Nov. 2, 1852; his parents were Joseph and Mary (Dougherty) Varier, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania; he lived on a farm till he was 12 years of age, when his father sold his farm and moved to Marshall county; he attended the Salem College from 1864 to 1868; he taught school until 1871, then commenced reading medicine under the instructions of Dr. T. T. Linn, at Bourbon, a very eminent surgeon in that place; he studied with him for about five years, and in the meantime attended the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis; in 1876 he attended the Cincinnati regular Medical College, at which he graduated; he then returned home and commenced practicing in North Liberty. Mr. V. has distinguished himself in his profession in that town and vicinity, has been a member of the St. Joseph County Medical Society since 1876. He has married Oct. 15, 1878, to Miss Ella Vasburgh, daughter of Nelson and Eliza Vasburgh. Mr. V. is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


George Waldsmith was born in this county June 11, 1838; his parents, Peter and Susan Waldsmith, were natives of Ohio; he was reared on a farm in the wilds of St. Joseph county, and while others had access to common schools, he was deprived of them, having to stay at home and work for his mother, while his father was away laboring for their support. He was married Sept. 28, 1869, to Miss Maggie Lower, and their 2 children are Rosanna and Grant. Mrs. Waldsmith is a daughter of Peter and Rosanna Lower, natives of Ohio. She was educated in the Academy at Millersburg, O., and followed school-teaching for about 16 years. Mr. W.'s father was a settler in this county at the early period of 1832.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Geo. W. Williams was born Nov. 1, 1837, in the State of Illinois; his parents were James and Mary Williams, the former a native of Indiana, and the latter of Virginia. In early childhood he was taken by his parents to La Porte county, where he grew to manhood. Aug. 15, 1862, he enlisted in the army in121st Ind. Battery, and participated in the battles of Chickamauga, Hoover's Gap and other skirmishes . He served till the close of the war, was honorably discharged, and returned home and resumed farming. Feb. 19, 1869, he was married to Ann E. Auten, daughter of William and Sarah Auten, and their 2 children are Maretta M. and Charlie C. Mr. W. owns a farm of 80 acres on sec. 36.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Samuel Williams, a prominent farmer in Liberty tp., was born in Cumberland county, Me., Dec. 18, 1802; his parents were George and Mable (Lichfield) Williams, the former a native of Maine and the latter of Massachusetts. Mr. W. came West with his family in 1838, by lake from Buffalo to Detroit, and arrived in this county Nov. 3, at which time he had $300 in money. He bought 80 acres of land, and commenced improving it, and by perseverance and economy accumulated enough to enable him to live in retirement the rest of his days. He was married in 1835 to Eliza F. Thomas and they have 9 children, of whom 6 are living, viz.: Henry S., Frances M., wife of Joseph Cole, Harriet R., wife of A. Cunningham, Charles H., Paris A. and Eugene. Mr. W's father was a Captain in the war of 1812, and his grandfather Lichfield fought through the Revolutionary war. He is a member of the M. E. Church.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Jonathan Witwer was born Feb. 10, 1822, in Lancaster county, Penn. His parents, Abraham and Elizabeth Witwer, were also natives of' Pennsylvania. He spent his early days on a farm, and his educational advantages wore limited to the common schools. In 1343 he moved to Summit county, Ohio, and in 1861 to this county; in 1864 he moved to Elkhart county, and in 1868 returned to this county, where he still resides, following farming. He was married May 21, 1844, to Christina Henney, (daughter of David and Margaret Henney, and of their 15 children 9 are living; viz.: Anna, now Mrs. Silas Fisher; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Samuel Thornton; Simon S., Margaret, now Mrs. Henry Ross; Joseph, John B., Lucy F., Charles L. and Maty. Mr. Witwer owns a fine farm of 100 acres in sec. 9, worth $5,000. Mr. and Mrs. W. are members of the Christian Church.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Liberty Township


Deb Murray