LINCOLN TOWNSHIP The territory now included in Lincoln township was formerly a part of the territory that constituted Liberty township, and owing to the great inconveniences to which the settlers in what is now Lincoln township were subjected in attending elections, they in June, 1866, presented to the Board petitions for the territory now included in the limits of Lincoln township to be detached and made an independent township, and that Walkerton should be the place of holding their elections, and. that the township be given the name of Lincoln. Their petitions were granted by the Board, and the township was detached, and W m. A. Hawe was appointed Trustee.

The first election in this township was held in April, 1867, at the Walkerton Hotel, Mr. Wm. A. Haven acting: as Inspector, Robert A. Wilson and J. O. Akin as Judges, and Paul Straub, Clerk. At this election 166 votes were cast. The following persons were elected to office, viz.: Neely Frame, Justice of the Peace; A. O. Hamilton, Trustee; and Zebedee James and Samuel Hudelmyer, Constables. At the next election Wm. J. Wolfe and John Calman were elected Justices of the Peace, and H. J. Kinney, Trustee, which office he held till 1876. The present Justices are S. J. Nichols and Amos H. Stevison; the Trustee is Silas George.

A considerable portion of the land of Lincoln township is marshy and wet, but is fast being reclaimed by draining. The leading industry of this township is farming in connection with stock-raising.

The first settlement in this township was made in the fall of 1835 by Christian Fulmer and family. The next spring Thomas H. Wiley came in, it then forming a part of Liberty township; it was slow in being settled, but about the year 1850 settlers came in more rapidly and it was not long till it was mostly occupied and owned by the residents.

The only town in Lincoln township is Walkerton. This town was laid out in March, 1857, by one Mr. Allen. "West Troy," as it was formerly called, and which now forms a part of the town of Walkerton, was a village of only a few houses situated at the junction of the I., P. & C. with the B. & O. railroad. This village was laid out in 1855. The post office was designated as West York, and was situated one-half mile south of Walkerton. It was kept by Mr. C. W. N. Stephens, who had established it in 1851, and was the first appointee. He also had a grocery store, and still holds the position of Postmaster. The mail at that time was being conveyed by the hack from LaPorte to Plymouth, there being no railroads here . In 1854 Mr. Stephens built the first house in Walkerton, and also erected a store-building, and soon after opened a store, which was the first in the place. The site of Walkerton was then covered with a dense thicket. No roads had yet been laid out. The settlers there who had stores would go out before breakfast, as they had leisure no other time of day, and chop and slash down the underbrush to make roads through which teams might pass.

In 1856 the wishes of the people were much gratified at the construction of the I., P. & C. railroad. Then the business prospects of Walkerton began to brighten. It continued to grow, and in 1873 the Baltimore & Ohio railroad was built, crossing the I., P. & C. railroad at West Troy, which now forms the western part of Walkerton. In 1876 Walkerton was incorporated. The petitions were presented in 1874, but by some mistake were not received until 1876.

The present business of Walkerton consists of four dry-goods establishments, one clothing store, two hard ware and implement stores, three drug stores, one large furniture store, two hotels, one a very fine house, of which Mr. J. M. B. Giberson is proprietor, also groceries and restaurants, and two railroad depots, one grain depot, two millinery stores, two printing-offices; at one the St. Joseph County Republican is published, and edited by J. F. & W. O. Endly, and at the other the Walkerton Visitor is published and edited by Henry S. Mintle. There are also two meat shops, two saloons, one town hall, owned by Jacob Bender, one school-house and three churches. In all there are about 50 business men engaged here.

The first church in the township was the Methodist Episcopal at Walkerton, and was erected in 1859, during the pastorate of Rev. J. E. Newhouse and the administration of Presiding Elder James Johnson. The following named persons were the establishers of this church: H: Haskins, exhorter and leader; Emery Otwell, exhorter and steward; J. A. Lambert, exhorter and leader, and several others whose names could not be obtained. This society was long known as the West York Mission Church, but some years since was changed to the name of Walkerton Church. Rev. R. H. Sanders is the present pastor.

In 1870 the Baptist church was erected, and in 1876 the Roman Catholics put up a church building.

The first school building in Lincoln tp. was erected in 1858 in Walkerton, and in 1876 it was removed to the present situation. The same year an additional apartment was added for the purpose of holding a graded school. They now have three grades of schools, a high school, of which Prof. J. A. Jones is principal; the intermediate, taught by Mrs. C. M. Poffenberger; and the primary, by Miss A. Millard.

Walkerton is a little town of much business, and being situated at the junction of two very prominent railroads, commands a wonderful amount of trade, especially grain. During the season of 1880 about 200,000 bushels of wheat were purchased at this point . Thus the outlook for the prosperity of Walkerton is good, and the place will, perhaps, in time become a populous town.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Abraham Barkley, dealer in drugs, groceries, etc., Walkerton, Ind. The subject of this sketch is a native of Ohio, and was born April 22, 1850. His parents, Samuel and Elizabeth Barkley, were also natives of Ohio. He was reared on a farm and educated in the common country schools. In 1872 he carne to Walkerton and opened a drug store. In 1870 he studied dentistry under the instructions of Dr. Cooper, of Plymouth, and afterward under Dr. Jackson, of Walkerton. Mr. B. was married Oct. 27, 1873, to Frances A. Akes, by whom he has had 3 children.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Allen Beall was born in Franklin county, Ohio, June 6, 1820. His parents, Joseph and Catharine (Blout) Beall, were natives of old Virginia's shore. He was reared on a farm; his educational advantages were limited to the common schools of the country, which were held in rude log cabins, where sometimes the ground served as the floor, and slab-seats, greased paper window lights, a large fire-place, almost the full width of the cabin, and a stick chimney were employed. Columbus at that time was but a small town of about 600 inhabitants. In 1832 his parents moved with him to Noble county, Ind., where he spent years of toil on the frontier. In 1866 they moved to Missouri, where they lived about two years, following milling. He then came to this county, where he bas since resided, engaged in farming. He was married Feb. 2, 1844, to Angelina Lee, daughter of Martin and (Kelly) Lee. She was a cousin of Gen. Robert E. Lee, so eminent in the Southern army in the last war. Five children were born to them, of whom 4 are living, viz.: Rayon, B. H., next mentioned, D. W. and Helen L., now wife of P. Byers. Mr. Bean's grandfathers, Beall and Blout, were both soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Mr. B. owns a farm of 240 acres.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


B. H. Beall, attorney at law and notary public, Walkerton, Ind., was born in Noble county, Ind., Aug. 16, 1848, son of the above mentioned. He was reared on a farm, and educated in the Wolf Lake Seminary and Bloomington University, at Fillmore, Missouri. He graduated at the last named place and received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Soon after his graduation he commenced preaching in the Northwest Indiana Conference. In 1874 he was transferred to the Nebraska Conference. He continued traveling and preaching in different States till 1876, when he commenced reading law, and was admitted to the Bar the same year. He has since been engaged in that business, preaching occasionally. Mr. Beall was married Dec. 23, 1867, to Miss Lois M. Gorsline, daughter of M. R. and Julia A. Gorsline, and their 4 children are: Ellen M., Thos. E., Jesse and Ray. Mr. B's father is still living, at the ripe age of 67. As far back as we can trace Mr. B's ancestors we find that they took a very active part in military affairs; some of them were in the Revolution and others were on the frontier to protect the white settlers.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


William Bellinger, farmer, sec. 17; P.O., Walkerton, Ind. was born in Oneida connty, .N. Y., June 18, 1827; his parents, David and Olive (Martin) Bellinger, were natives of Massachusetts. In 1834 he went to Allen county, Ohio, and in 1863 came to St. Joseph county. Mr. B's father and mother both died while he was young, and he was bound out to a stranger. At the age of 21 his assumed father gave him $100 in money and a fine suit of clothes. Thus he started in life, and by his good judgment and continued industry he has become possessor of a farm of 120 acres, valued at $75 per acre. Jan. 6, 1850, he was married to Miss Catharine Riggle, by whom he has had 8 children; of these, 7 are living, viz.: Geo. D., Sarah E. (now Mrs. Joseph Gahart), Olive A., Wm. M., Samuel M., John J. and Mary A.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Jacob Bender was born in Pennsylvania Jan. 22, 1804. His parents were John and Barbara (Cook) Bender. He was reared on a farm till he was 16 years of age; then he worked at the undertaker's business till about 1825; then for the next 20 years he followed milling. He came to Starke county in 1844, and in 1846 to North Liberty, this county; in 1848 went back to Starke county, and in 1855 returned to this county. He followed farming about 20 years. In 1863 he moved to Plymouth, and in 1864 came to Walkerton, where he has since resided. Mr. Bender was married Feb. 27, 1826, to Jane Dobbs, daughter of James and Harriet (Miller) Dobbs, and they have had 10 children, 5 of whom are living, viz.: John S., a lawyer in Plymouth, who also traveled extensively in Europe, and wrote after his return to America a book entitled, "A Hoosier's Experience in Western Europe;" he is also author of a book on the money question; Robert H., Auditor of Starke county, who was for several years civil engineer of that county. Susanna J., now Mrs. Edward Tibbetts, in Marion, Ind; Adalaide, now Mrs. Dr. L. D. Glazebrook, of San Pierre; and John G., a drygoods merchant in Fort Wayne. Mr. Bender owns a fine brick store building, the upper story of which is the noted Bender's Hall; it also contains an Odd Fellows Hall. Mr. and Mrs. B. are members of the M. E. Church.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Jas. Blain was born in Pennsylvania Dec. 5, 1826, son of George and Eliza Blain; the former was a native of Ireland, and the latter of Pennsylvania. In 1863 he came to this county, where he has since resided, following farming. He was married June 8, 1854, to Elizabeth Emans, and of their 12 children 8 are living, viz.: Anna E., Emma M., Clara, Ella J., Hannah M., GeorgeW., Jas. H. and Andrew S. Mr. B. owns 160 acres of land, 8 of which lies in La Porte county.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


John Cotton was born on the island of Prince Edwards, Dec. 14, 1822; his parents, Joseph and Elizabeth Cotton, were natives of Cornwall, England. They emigrated to America in 1822 and located in Upper Canada. Our subject lived in his native place till 1839, when he went to Trumbull county, Ohio; there he worked at the wagon and carriage-making trade for some years, then went to Akron; worked there at the same trade for two years; he then went to Ravenna and worked one year. In July, 1843, he came to Elkhart, and in 1849 went to South Bend. While at that place he worked at his trade, or till 1863, when he commenced working in a sash and blind factory. He followed that for about 12 years. In 1868 he moved out into this tp., where he still resides, engaged in farming. He was married in 1845 to Miss Rebecca Dever, by whom he had 6 children; of these, one is living: J. Willis. Mrs. C. died Sept, 30, 1876, and Mr. C. was again married Dec. 20, 1877, to Sarah A. Quigley, nee Lambert, daughter of John A. and Mary Lambert, who were natives of Virginia. Mrs. C. was the wife of John B. Quigley, who was an exhorter in the M. E. Church. Mr. Q. was a soldier in the late war, and while he was out he took sick and soon after died, at Harrodsburg, Ky. Mr. and Mrs. Quigley had three children, 2 of whom arc living: Margaret M. and John J. H.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


John Cripe was born in Fort Wayne, Oct. 11, 1826, a son of Rinehart and Elizabeth Cripe. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and his mother of Ohio. In early childhood he was taken by his parents to Goshen, and in 1835 to South Bend. In the spring of 1836 they moved out into Lincoln tp., where his father purchased a large tract of land, of about 1,000 acres. In the spring of 1847 they started for Oregon, wintered at St. Joseph, Missouri, and in the spring of 1848 they resumed traveling and arrived at their destination Sept. 5. In 1850 they went to California, and located about 60 miles from Sacramento. In 1852 our subject, with his family, returned to their former home in St. Joseph county, where he invested in lands. His father bought a steam saw-mill; in this business he utterly failed. He then disposed of the remnant of his property, and in the fall of 1862 he and family started for California. They spent the winter in Iowa and in the spring John and his family started for California and met his father and family at Council Bluffs, Iowa, where a large train was starting across the plains. They arrived in California Aug. 5. They returned home in 1865, on the Union Pacific railroad. Sept. 16, 1870, his mother died, and the 30th day of the following October his father died, at the ripe age of 80 years. Our subject was married May 20, 1847, to Ann E. Petrie, daughter of Will and Mary Petrie, natives of Canada, and they had 11 children, of whom 6 are living; viz.: William, Mary E., now wife of Jacob Rinehart; Joseph A., John C. W., Anna E., now wife of Marion Murray, and Ada J. July 23, 1880, the happiness of Mr. Cripe was marred by the death of his wife. In the death of this aimable woman a loss was suffered in that family that can never, never he repaired. She did all in her power to harmonize the feelings of this little family and to promote their earthly happiness. She was always cheerful and sociable, and by thus doing she won the love and esteem of all who knew her. Even the stranger, however depraved he appeared to be, was cared for and treated with the greatest hospitality. In this sad affair a family circle is broken, and the neighborhood has lost a friend whose equal is seldom found. She was a member of the German Baptist Church for 18 years, and during that time led a life of perfect consistency.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Tobias Cripe, brother of the preceding, was born in this county in 1837; lived on a farm in St. Joseph county till 1848, when he and his parents went to Oregon Territory. They lived amid the wilds of that uncivilized Territory till 1850, when they went to California, and in 1852 they returned to St. Joseph county. He followed farming here till the spring of 1863, when he went back to California; he lived there till 1870, when he returned to this county, where he has since resided, following farming and stock-raising. His father was one of the earliest settlers in St. Joseph county; he broke the land of the first lot in South Bend. In 1862 Mr. Tobias Cripe was married to Ann R. Hi1linger, by whom he has had 4 children, viz.: Sarah F.; David S., Oliver and Edward. Mr. Cripe owns a farm of 115 acres, valued at $70 per acre.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


William Cripe was born in 1849 in St. Joseph county; his parents were John and Eliza Cripe, both natives of Indiana; he was reared on a farm and has since followed that occupation. He was married in 1868 to Miss Jane Jones, and to them have been born one child, Ralph W.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Benjamin Eager was born Oct. 25, 1816, in Pennsylvania; his parents, John and Hester Eager, were also natives of Pennsylvania. In 1828 he and his parents went to Holmes county, Ohio, and in 1835 to Seneca county. He was married Aug. 22, 1844, to Elizabeth Bolin, daughter of James and Mary Bolin. This union was blest with 7 children, 5 of whom are living, viz.: James M., John M., Benjamin F., Lee and Lottie, wife of Eleazer Smith. Mr. E. owns a farm of 156 acres.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Dr. James F. Endly, editor and publisher of the St. Joseph Republican, Walkerton, Ind., was born in Wayne county, Ohio, Aug. 22, 1839; his parents were Samuel and Rosanna Endly; when in early childhood, he was taken by his parents to La Grange, where he was reared and educated in the common school. He began the study of medicine when 18 years of age, and in one year quit it for a time; then resumed it and studied two years, and commenced practicing in De Kalb county, Ind. In 1866 he went to Brimfield, Noble county, and in 1868 he attended the Bennett Medical College at Chicago. At the close of the term he returned to Brimfield and resumed practice. In 1875 he came to Walkerton and opened a drug store, also continuing practice till July, 1879, when he and Dr. Richmond established a paper called The Van Guard, after publishing this paper about three months, Dr. E. and his son Willie A. purchased the printing office and started the St. Joseph. County Republican. Dr. E. was married June 22, 1851, to Miss Cora A. Coomer, a native of La Grange county, and they have one child, Willie A. Dr. E. still owns a drug store in Walkerton, besides other property.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Neely Frame was among the earliest settlers in St. Joseph county. He was born in Ohio Oct. 29, 1809; his parents were Jesse and Nancy Frame. In 1821 he came with his parents to Wayne county, Ind., where he spent the first half of his life; and in 1830 he came to this county, the southern part of which was then still an Indian territory. The county was organized the fall prior to his coming here. He saw the first boat that ever passed up the St. Joseph river; it was in the spring of 1831. Mr. Frame moved into Lincoln tp., where he was elected the first Justice of the Peace. He was married in June, 1845, to Catharine Leach, daughter of Daniel and Nancy Leach, natives of Pennsylvania; of their 11 children 10 are living, viz.: Nancy, now Mrs. Wm. Long; Almira, now Mrs. Andrew; Eliza A., now Mrs. Lewis VanPelt; Daniel W., Horace G., Anson B., Schuyler C. and John N. He owns 140 acres in sec. 13.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Jacob C. Fulmer was born in New York Dec. 1, 1827. His parents, Jacob and Polly Fulmer, were natives of New York. He was reared on a farm and educated in a common country school. He came to this county in October, 1853. In 1857 he was married to Miss Rosanna Hayes, by whom he has had 2 children, viz.: Schuyler C. and Maria E., both school teachers. Mr. F's greatgrandfather, Christian Fulmer, served seven years in the Revolutionary war; first entered as a drummer boy.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Oliver R. Fu1mer is the 4th child in a family of 6 children, the others being Mary J., Evart, Alfred, William and Henry, all of whom are now deceased. Oliver was born in Cuyahoga county, N. Y., son of Christian Fulmer. He came with his parents to this county in 1835, and settled in Lincoln tp., being the first family that had settled here. Here on the frontier the subject of this sketch was reared to manhood. He was married July 16, 1854, to Elizabeth Dewitt, by whom he had 2 children, both dead. Mr. Fulmer again married Dec. 6, 1865, to Catharine Miller, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Miller, natives of Ohio. They have had 3 children: Martha A., Dora M. and Mamie Pearl. Mr. F. followed farming till the spring of 1860, when he went to California, via the overland route. He returned in 1862 via Panama. In December, 1863, he enlisted in the army in Co. H, 12th Cavalry. He participated in the battles of Stone River, Huntsville, Alabama, and siege of Mobile, where he was taken sick, which resulted in his being confined for six months in the Columbus hospital; after he recovered he returned home and resumed farming, which he followed till he moved to Walkerton. Mr. Fulmer is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Mr. Fulmer's father, Christian Fulmer, was born Oct. 4, 1799, and when the war of 1812 opened he, nothing but a boy of 13 summers, procured a drum and enlisted for the position of drummer. He passed through that war, and when the Mexican war broke out he went as Drum Major there, and in the late war he was Drum Major. Thus he had a military life in three wars. He died Dec. 6, 1878, at the ripe age of nearly 80 years. He had been a member of the Baptist Church for a half a century, and fully that long a member of the Masonic fraternity.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


J. M. B. Giberson, proprietor of the Florence House, Walkerton, Ind., was born in Wayne county, N. Y., Dec. 25, 1833; his parents were Jacob M. and Anna Giberson; he was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools; when young he learned the harness-maker's trade, at which he worked in after years. In 1849 he went to Lafayette, Ohio, and in 1850 to Liverpool, O., where he staid till 1852, when he went to Randolph, Stark county, O. In 1853 he came to Walkerton, where he resided till 1855, when he returned to his native place and remained till Aug. 22, 1862, when he enlisted in the army. He served one year in Co. D, 162d Reg. N. Y. Inf. While in the military service he participated in the following engagements: Fort Patterson, Algiers and the skirmish from Brazier City to Fort Patterson, which lasted seven days. He was discharged Aug. 3, 1863, at New Orleans. He then returned to Walkerton and opened the Walkerton Hotel, which house he kept till 1875,wben he built the Florence House. Mr. G. was married May 2, 1853, to Miss Lizzie Smallman, daughter of Francis and Elizabeth Smallman, and they have one child, Florence, now wife of George H. Leslie. To them have been born 2 children, viz.: Ada Lizzie and Francis Morris.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


W. O. Hale, of the firm of Reece & Hale, meat merchants, was born June 26, 1845. He is a son of William and Clarinda Hale, both natives of Virginia. His father died when he was but two years old. His mother is still living, at the age of 60 years.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Wm. W. Hamilton, of the firm of Hamilton & Thompson, proprietors of the Walkerton Livery Stable, was born in Noble county, Ind., March 31, 1840; his parents, William and Nancy Hamilton, were also natives of Ohio; he was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools. In July, 1867, he came to Walkerton and opened a grocery store. He continued in this business a few years only. He followed buggy and carriage painting about five years. In September, 1861, he enlisted in the military service in Co. C, 30th Regt. Ind. Vol., and participated in the battle of Pittsburg Landing; was wounded and was afterward discharged, having served nearly one year. He was married July 12, 1871, to Miss Jennie Whitticar, daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah Whitticar.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


John W. Kirtsinger, proprietor of the Empire House, was born April 4, 1848, in the"Boone State." His parents were Harrison and Sarah Kirtsinger. He lived in Kentucky till 1859, when he went to Johnson county, Ind. During the years 1862-'63 he was in the employ of the Government, driving a stage-coach from Louisville to Bardstown in Kentucky; he returned to Johnson county in the early part of 1864, and in 1865 went to Marshall county, in 1870 to La Porte, the same year he came to Walkerton, where he still resides. He was married Jan. 8, 1870, to Eliza Martin, by whom he had 4 children; of these one is living, L. Ettie.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


C. B.Libbey, jeweler and dealer in all kinds of American watches, docks, jewelry, silver-plated ware, musical instruments and sewing machines, Walkerton, Ind.; is a native of Ohio, where he was born Feb. 14, 1841, and is a son of William and Lucinda Libbey, the former a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter of Ohio. He lived on a farm until 1858, when he went to La Grange; in 1859 he went to La Porte city; Nov. 3, 1861, he enlisted in the army, in Co. B, 48th Regt. Ind. Inf., and participated in the following battles: Iuka, Corinth, siege of Vicksburg, Raymond, Fort Gibson, Chattahoochee, Savannah, Raleigh, and with Sherman on his march to the sea. When he was discharged he returned to Rochester and worked at watch-making till 1871, when he came to Walkerton and opened a jewelry store in this place. He carries a stock of goods amounting to $1,500, his annual sales exceeding his stock. Mr. L. was married Sept. 2, 1859, to Miss Marinda A. Richardson, by whom he had one child, Roscoe C.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Rev. H. N Macomber was born in Maine June 22, 1814. His parents were Elijah and Elizabeth Macomber. He was reared on a farm and educated in Perces' Academy at Middleborough, Mass.; was for ten years an itinerant minister of the M. E. Church of Maine. He still preaches. In 1845 he learned dentistry in Lynn, Mass., and first practiced at Saco, Me. In 1853 he went to Lynn, Mass., in 1867 to Elkhart county, Ind., in 1879 he came to Walkerton, where he still resides, engaged in the practice of his profession. Mr. Macomber was married in 1836 to Miss Mary Wingate, by whom he has had 4 children; of these one is living, Horatio E. Mrs. M. departed this life Jan. 2, 1876, and Mr. M. again married Feb. 8, 1880, to Mrs. Elizabeth Henderson (nee Lambert). Mrs. Macomber has taught school in this county for 20 years.

Mr. Macomber's grandfather on his father's side was a commissioned officer in the Revolutionary war; also some of his earlier ancestors were officers in that war.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


John J. Miller, proprietor of the stage line from Walkerton to South Bend, was born in Noble county July 29, 1840, and is a son of John and Rachel (Bailey) Miller; he was a farmer boy, and his educational advantages were limited to the common schools of the country. His father was one of the early pioneers of St. Joseph county. In 1866 our subject left Noble county and came to Walkerton, and engaged in the mercantile business, in which he continued until 1871. He was also Constable and Deputy Sheriff for four years. He also traveled for some time for Higgins & Belden Atlas Company; June 7,1878, he made his first trip with the stage from Walkerton to South Bend, and has since been proprietor of that line. He makes three trips per week, viz.: Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, leaving Walkerton each day at six A. M., arriving at South Bend at 11 A. M., returning the same day, arriving at Walkerton at 6 P. M. Aug. 18, 1864, Mr. Miller was married to Miss Rhoda A. Wolfe, by whom he has had 3 children: 2 of these are living, viz.: Jay Fred and Maggie Viola.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Henry S. Mintle, editor and publisher of the Walkerton Visitor, was born Oct. 22, 1827, in Warren county, Ohio; his parents were Philip and Mary Mintle, both natives of New York. He lived on a farm till he was 16 years old, then went to Port William, Clinton county, Ohio; there he clerked in a dry-goods store till 1847, then returned home and followed farming till December, 1848, then he entered the dry-goods store of Jesse Rider at West Point; he clerked in this establishment till l861, when he enlisted in the war in Co. G, 40th Regt. Ind. Inf., but soon afterward was appointed 1st Sergeant. He served in this capacity till 1863, when he was discharged on account of his disability. He then returned home and had charge of the grocery establishment of Wileburg & Co., North Judson, for three years. Then he clerked in the store of Keller & Co., 1873-'4. In May, 1875, he came to Walkerton, where he established the Greenback paper, the Walkerton Visitor. He issued the first number May 5, 1875; 900 copies of this paper are in circulation. Mr. Mintle was married Dec. 12, 1848, to Harriet J. Nash, by whom he has had 5 children; of these, 2 are living; viz.: Flora B., now Mrs. Fiddler, in Logan county, Ohio, and Ida A.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Isaiah Poffenberger physician and surgeon, Walkerton, Ind., was born in Ohio, Oct. 31, 1836; was educated at the Seven-Mile Academy and Quaker Institute in Ohio; after finishing his scientific course he followed school teaching for ten years; in 1856 he commenced reading medicine, and from 1859 to 1862 he attended the Cincinnati Medical College, at which he graduated with the honors of his class. He commenced practicing medicine in Seven-Mile, Ohio, and after a short time he came to South Bend. In 1863 he enlisted in the army, was an assistant of Prof. Blackman, General Surgeon of the U. S. army, and was with him at the battle of Chickamauga, Shiloh and Stone River. In March, 1865, he was commissioned by Gov. O. P. Morton as Surgeon, and he served in this capacity till the close of the war. He was married Oct. 16, 1861, to Mattie J. Edwards, by whom he had 2 children, viz.: Jennie V. and Addie R. Mrs. P. died Nov. 23, 1869, and Mr. P. again married April 5, 1871, to Cynthia McMunn. History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


J. N. Reece was born Dec. 25, 1855. His parents, David W. and Nancy M. Reece, are old residents of the county. He was reared on a farm and educated at Asbury University; has taught school about six years. He was principal of the North Liberty schools for two years; he is at present a meat merchant in Walkerton. He was married May 11, 1879, to Miss Luella Cole, daughter of D. O. and Harriet (Waggoner) Cole, natives of Ohio. They have had one child; namely, Charles Howard. Mr. R's grandfather, Jeremiah .Wilson, was a Colonel in the war of 1812.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Benjamin F. Rinehart is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth Rinehart, and the youngest of a family of 11 children. He was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, Dec. 13, 1838. His parents were natives of Pennsylvania. He was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. Mr. Rinehart followed school-teaching eight years, in connection with farming. April 19, 1861, he enlisted in the army in Co. A, 21st Reg. Ohio Vol. Militia, under Capt. James Wilson. He served in that division about four months. He then returned home and resumed his occupation, farming and school-teaching. In 1863 he moved to Holmes county, O., and in 1864 he came to St. Joseph county, where he still resides, engaged in the independent business of farming. He has 220 acres. Mr. Rinehart was joined in marriage to Catharine Steele, Nov. 27, 1862, and they have had 8 children, of whom 6 are living, viz.: Robert E., Louisa E., Emma L., Seward C., Willard F. and Lawrence F.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


John Rudduck was born Feb. 16, 1809, in Guilford county, N. C. Tradition is that his great-grandfather came from Ireland about one century prior to the Revolution, and settled in North Carolina. He married and had a son, Wil1iam, who married and had 2 children, Jane and John. John, the father of the subject of this notice, was left an orphan at a very early age, and was bound out to learn the hatter's trade; after attaining his maturity, he married Ursula Crews; and some years afterward emigrated to Tennessee, where he stopped on the Clinch river, and thence moved to Kentucky, and thence to Clinton county, Ohio. Their children are William, David, John, Sarah, Nancy, Isaac, Jonathan A. and Moses M. Mr. R.'s father died in Warren county, Ind., and his mother in St. Joseph. Mr. Rudduck served all apprenticeship with his father at the hatter's trade till he was 21 years of age, and then shouldered his rifle and knapsack and started for Michigan, where he arrived in May, 1832; while there Mr. Rudduck was a member of the military company under Gen. Butler; and while in that State he attended an Indian"war dance," at Edwardsburg, Cass county. He remarks that it was the most hideous sight and warlike he ever witnessed . In 1832 he came to St. Joseph county, at which time the country was a perfect wilderness. He followed the Indian trail from Logansport to the St. Joseph river, where Mr. Coquillard kept a trading-post with the Indians. He visited the few families that had settled in the great forest. At first he engaged in breaking prairie and made himself generally useful among the settlers. Aug. 1, 1833, he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob and Susanna Rupel, who were old settlers in this county. To them were born 8 children, 3 living, viz.: Nancy E., wife of Jackson Gard; Maria A., wife of Michael Loy, and Martha C., wife of Geo. W. Garwood. Mrs. R. died Jan. 30, 1874, and Mr. R. again married in October, 1878, Mrs. Sophia Cook, formerly the wife of Rev. Elias Cook, deceased. Mr. R. is a member of the M. E. Church.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Philo E. Ruggles was born Oct. 19, 1815, in New York, son of Jehiah and Sybil Ruggles, natives of Connecticut. In 1829 he went to Ohio, and in 1838 came to St. Joseph county. In 1843 he went to Marshall county, and in 1848 he returned to this county . He was married in 1848 to Anna E. Leach, by whom he has had 4 children; of these, 2 are living, viz.: Wm. H. H. and Jane, now Mrs. Arnold.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


A. B. Rupel, harness-maker, etc., Walkerton, Ind., was born in this county July 7, 1859, son of Jacob and Sarah Rupel, natives of Ohio. He was reared on a farm, and educated in the Walkerton schools. He was married April 12, 1880, to Anna Zahrt, daughter of Will. Zahrt, who was a native of La Porte county. Mr. Rupel opened his harness shop in Walkerton in 1878, and has since continued in the business.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Jacob Rupel was born in Preble county, Ohio, Nov. 28, 1806; his parents were Martin and Nancy Rupel, the former a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter of Delaware. At the age of 12 he went to Darke county, where he lived till 1835, when he came to this county, which was at that time a wilderness, with but a few settlers who had just ventured in. He was one of the organizers of Liberty tp., and assisted in building its first churches and schoolhouses. The wild deer roamed in great herds through the forests and over the swamps and marshes of the Kankakee. Mr. Rupel, in company with the noble red man, went on many a hunting expedition over this territory, and by continued practice with the Indian boys became expert as a marksman, and was generally known there as the renowned "deer-hunter." Sometimes he would go out and kill two or three before breakfast, so very numerous were they. Nov. 20, 1827, Mr. R. was married to Miss Leah Miller, daughter of Christopher and Susanna Miller, who were natives of Pennsylvania. To this union were born 7 children, of whom 6 are living, viz.: Sarah, now Mrs. Benj. Ross; Nancy, now Mrs. Mark Smith; John W.; Mary, now Mrs. Lewis Paul; Susanna, now Mrs. C. W. N. Stephens; Lydia, now Mrs. Nathaniel Canada. Mrs. Rupel died Sept. 10, 1852, and Mr. Rupel again married Mar. 17, 1854, Sarah Henry, by whom he had one child, Arvard B. Mrs. Rupel died Aug. 17, 1872, and .Mr. R. again married Jan. 1, 1873, Caroline Gill, who died June 13, 1880.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Rev. R. H. Sanders was born in Greensburg, Pa., Oct. 12, 1833, son of James S. and Mary A. Sanders. In early life he with his parents moved to Richland county, Ohio, and in 1846 came to Lake county, Ind., and located near Crown Point. Mr. Sanders was educated in a common school, and followed teaching for seven years, studying during spare time, and thus attained a fair education in the languages and theology, all without the instructions of any person. Thus Mr. Sanders well understands the process of self-acquired education. He was licensed to preach in 1861, and he immediately entered on his mission. He united with the Northwest Indiana Conference in 1863. The following are the circuits which he has traveled: San Pierre, 1863; Winamac and Star City, 1864-'5; Hebron, Porter county, 1866-'7; Valparaiso, 1868-'9; Argus, Marshall county, 1870; Westville, 1871; Door Village, 1872-'4; at North Liberty, 1875-'7; at Lowell, Lake county, 1878, and Walkerton, 1879. Mr. Sanders has been unusually successful in his ministerial labors. He has averaged 100 accessions annually to the Church since he commenced preaching. He has also built several churches, one at Union Mills, one at Winamac, one at North Liberty, and one at Maple Grove. May 15, 1852, Mr. Sanders was joined in the bond of holy matrimony to Miss Mary A. Sutton. This union was blest with one child, Mellie J., wife of John C. Gordon, a grain dealer at Argus City.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


John Schwartz, of the firm of Schwartz & Tischer, proprietors of the Walker ton Planing Mills, was born Nov. 1, 1838, in Richmond county, O. His parents were Henry H. and Elva Schwartz. He was reared on a farm. When 18 years of age he learned the carpenter trade. Jan. 11, 1861, he married Jemima Brackney, by whom he has had 2 children, viz.: Anna E. and Lucia.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


John Smith was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, Oct. 22, 1828. He is a son of Samuel and Catharine Smith. He was brought to this county by his parents in 1830. They first settled near Rum Village, about three miles south of South Bend. In 1835 they moved to La Porte county. In 1848 they returned to St. Joseph county and in 1852 settled in Lincoln tp., where he still resides. When they first settled in this county the Indians were as numerous as the whites at the present day. South Bend was but a small village, and was a rendezvous for the red-skins, as it was a noted trading point between them and the whites. Mr. Smith, when a boy, attended school in a log hut. Thus we see his advantages to secure an education were very limited. Mr. S. was married Sept. 30, 1853, to Miss Ellen Usher, by whom he had 4 children; 2 are living, viz.: Louisa J., now Mrs. Benj. Pratt, and Frank. Mrs. Smith died Feb. 11, 1878. Mr. Smith's grandfathers, Henry Smith and Samuel Harmison, were both soldiers in the war of1812. They fought till the war closed, and were here also when Tecumseh fell.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


U. F. Townsend was born in Penn Yan, N. Y., in 1820. He is a son of John F. and Celestia Townsend, natives also of New York. His grandfather was an early settler in Pennsylyania, on the Susquehanna, some time during the French and Indian war, and was driven by the savage natives to Harrisburg . They escaped their hands by floating down the river in skiffs and on rafts. U. F. learned the shoemaker trade when he was 11 years old, and has since followed that occupation. He came to Walkerton in 1870. He was married in 1844 to Diantha Tuttle, by whom he has had 13 children. Of these, 5 are living, viz.: Charles M., Cortez C., Ella M., now Mrs. Decker ,Otto F. and Julia A. Many of Mr. and Mrs. Townsend's early ancestors were soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Mrs. T.ís grandfather, Capt. Holdridge, served from its beginning to the end.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


J B. Turner, the renowned theatrical proprietor and performer, is a native of Utica, N. Y., and was born April 6, 1828. His parents, Patrick and Nancy (Dunn) Turner, were natives of Ireland. Mr. Turner was educated at the Hamilton (New York) University. In 1848 he traveled with a troop as an actor; in 1849-'50, with a theatrical troop in Cincinnati; in 1851, in Detroit; from 1852 to 1855 he was in New York city; from 1855 to 1860, in Chicago; 1861-'2, in Detroit; 1863 in New York city again with Bowey's Theater Troop; 1864, in Chicago; 1865-'6, in Columbus, Ohio, Fort Wayne and Leavenworth. In 1867 he started with a troop of his own, and since that time has traveled over Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska. The year 1880 he was proprietor of the Emma Leland combination troop. Mr. Turner was married in 1868 to Miss Emma Leland. He owns a pleasant residence in Walkerton, where he can retire during the hot summer days and from the exciting scenes of theatrical life.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


E J. Vincent, of the firm of B. H. &; E. J. Vincent, was born Aug. 19, 1846, in this county; his parents are B. H. and Betsey Vincent, the former a native of England and the latter of Ohio; was reared on a farm and educated in the common country schools. The year 1868 he followed railroading, and about seven months of 1869 he clerked in C. Behrn's store at Walkerton. There he was packer in a flouring mill for a time. He then followed his trade, carpenter and joiner, till the fall of 1876, when he in connection with his father opened a furniture store at Walkerton, and were also undertakers. They carry a stock of goods, consisting of house furniture, caskets, etc., to the amount of $3,000. Their annual sales amount to $4,000. Mr. V. was married Aug. 23, 1869, to Rebecca Woodard, daughter of Samuel Woodard, and 3 children were born to them, of whom 2 are living, viz.: Edward R., Clyde B. and Cora E., deceased.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Thos. H. Wiley. Among the earliest pioneers in (now) Lincoln tp. was Thos. H. Wiley, who was born in Monroe county, Ky., Dec. 27, 1810, a son of John and Mary (Sims) Wiley. In 1815 he was taken by his parents to Ohio, in 1817 they went to Tennessee, and in 1827 returned to Darke county, Ohio. Thus he spent the days of childhood and early manhood amid the wilds of Kentucky and Tennessee, and the vast, unbroken forests of Ohio, which thenwas inhabited only by the" noble" red man, and the wild animals roamed in almost countless herds through that vast wilderness. Mr. Wiley lived in Ohio till 1834, when he and his family, which consisted of his wife and 2 children, started for the" Hoosier State" on horseback. After six days of tiresome traveling they arrived in St. Joseph county, where they set stakes and spread, their blankets. There were at that time but four other settlers in this (Lincoln) tp., and they were living some distance-from him; all his near neighbors were Indians and wild animals. When Mr. Wiley arrived here he had but little property, and it consisted of two horses and another worthless" old pIng-." Thus he started in life.

Mr. Wiley's educational advantages were very limited. He attended school held in log school- houses, with greased-paper window lights, slab floor and seats, and stick chimney. What a hardship this would be to the children of the present day! In 1828 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Loring, by whom he has had 8 children; of these, 5 are living, viz.: Samuel, Augusta, Mary, now Mrs. John Dare, Geo. W. and John. Mr. Wiley's grandfathers, Wiley and Sims, were very early settlers in Kentucky. They were immediate successors of Daniel Boone, and one of them was an Indian spy. One day, in company with one Mr. Molky, a preacher, he struck an Indian trail. They followed it till it came to a large cavern in a hill, where they supposed an Indian had secreted himself. They began to explore the cavern in search of "big Injun," but had not proceeded far when by accident Mr. Molky's gun was discharged. This frightened Mr. W. almost out of his wits, and he seized Mr. M. by the arm and almost instantly emerged from the cave and sought refuge behind a large tree, thinking that it was from the Indian's rifle and expecting the next shot would be aimed at him; but was much surprised when Mr. M. recovered from the shock, to learn that it was from his gun.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Leonard Wolf, deceased, was born in Rocking county, Ohio, in March, 1812. His parents were George and Mary Wolf. He was reared on a farm. His father was among the first settlers in Hocking county, which was then an immense forest of very large trees, among which wild animals roamed undisturbed. Mr. Wolf came to Noble county, Ind., at a very early day . In 1834 he married Lutetia Martin, a native of Fairfield county, O., a daughter of Ellison and Jane Martin, who were natives of Pennsylvania. While they lived in Noble county Mrs. Wolf shared the severe lot of an early pioneer. She frequently was alone for the full week in the little log cabin, as Mr. Wolf was absent laboring for their support . The wild animals then were very numerous. Very frequently when Mrs. Wolf was alone and in the darkness of night, the vicious wolves, enraged by hunger, would come prowling around the pig-pen, and Mrs. Wolf would throw fire-brands at them and frighten them away. The wild Indian was also to be seen. At one time a band of 30 of these red savages camped on the farm near Mrs. Wolf's, while she was alone. What moral courage exhibited in these trying times! What heroic spirits these early pioneers possessed! They knew not but they might at almost any time fall into the hands of the merciless savages and all be massacred, as such has been the case. Mr. and Mrs. Wolf lived in Noble county till his death, which occurred about 1870, when Mrs. W. came to Walkerton. She has had 10 children, 6 sons and 4 daughters, viz.: Wm. J., Ellison M., Theron, T. J., a clothier in Walkerton; Jane, now Mrs. Henry Hastetter; Rhoda A., now Mrs. John J. Miller; Martha, now Mrs. Calvin Gilbert; Geo. W., Chas. S. and Maggie B., a milliner in Walkerton.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Lincoln Township


Deb Murray