OLIVE TOWNSHIP

Scarcely any township in Northern Indiana presents a fairer domain or more fertile soil than Olive township; but not until 1830 was it occupied by enterprising members of the white race. At the date mentioned there were about half as many Indians in this section of the county as there are whites at the present day.

Among the oldest settlers of Olive township we may mention that man of great memory, Mr. Barvilla Druliner, of New Carlisle, who was born July 7, 1807; Joseph Adams and wife, of section 31, the oldest couple now living in the township. Mr. A. made his start in the West by splitting rails, at 50 cents per 100, while boarding himself. He has made as many as 500 rails in one day. The young men of today would as soon try Dr. Tanner's experiment of fasting 40 days as to make 500 rails in one day. Jacob Rush, who was born in Ohio in 1806, is now living on section 36, one of our oldest pioneers. He held the plow for the first furrow ever turned in this township, and he also helped to raise the first cabin here, which belonged to his brother Israel Rush, who was afterward the first Justice of the Peace, and died in 1837. Jacob is still a lively and energetic man. Asher White was a boy of only 16 years of age when he came here in 1830. His biography is given more in full on a subsequent page.

Among the oldest settlers now deceased we mention Samuel and Jesse Goward, Jeremiah Williamson, John Balker, James Shingleton, Nathan Haines, Isaac Phillips, Jacob Egbert. There are others whose names we did not fully obtain.

What is now known as Olive township was once called the Indian reserve. In 1830 the northern line of the State was removed 10 miles farther north, in order that Indiana might have greater access to the lake.

At this time it was thought that it would be no great task to civilize and Christianize the untutored savage, and soon to have him wash oft his paint, lay aside his tomahawk, change his wigwam to a permanent house, his habits of idleness to those of industry, from reading the tracks of wild animals to the tracts of Christianity, etc., and consequently the whites established the "Carey Mission" one and one-fourth miles below Niles, at a point now called the Big Springs. It had at one time 200 Indian pupils. By a law of the general Government each pupil at this mission was to have 160 acres of land, to be selected for him by the Indian agent from the ten-mile strip mentioned above. Hence a large portion of this township was selected for these pupils; and hence also the Indians in this community were more quiet and friendly than elsewhere, and the whites felt safe among them. It is true that they suffered an alarm in this vicinity at the commencement of the Black Hawk war in the Northwest. It was reported that an Indian had killed a white man in the wild country where Chicago now stands, and ten men went from this settlement to examine the situation, but they returned the next day having found no cause of alarm. A fort was built at Plainfield.

This part of Indiana was surveyed in 1830 by William and Noah Brock, the latter running the base lines, and the former dividing the land into sections; and this township received its name in honor of the wife of Charles Vail. She is still living in New Carlisle. Mr. V., who settled here in 1830, was afterward elected County Judge. After the survey of the township, the first Justice of the Peace acted as County Commissioner until the regular annual election.

The first death in this township was that of Jonathan Garwood; another of the earliest deaths was that of Mrs. Garoutte, by freezing. She lived, however, just outside of the present limits of the township. See sketch, a little further on, of Hon. T. J. Garoutte, her son.

The first couple married in this township, according to the Atlas of the county, were Charles Vail and Olive Stanton, but this is not correct.

By the year 1836, about all the Government land was taken up. The land office was at Crawfordsville, and there were residents enough to justify the holding of public religious services. The first church was built at Hamilton in 1838, by the Methodists, who still hold meetings in it. At that time Hamilton was the great business center for this part of St. Joseph county. Since the railroad has been built through the county and made a station at New Carlisle, Hamilton has run down. This place is frequently called Terre Coupee, from a postoffice of that name near there. There are also at Hamilton a neat school-house, a grocery and several residences. This village is situated near the center of section 24, in Terre Coupee Prairie. This prairie was very marshy before it was drained and cultivated; it is now one of the most fertile spots in the State of Indiana. It is over four miles in diameter and contains 3,000 or 4,000 acres, which is worth $80 to $120 an acre. It is almost as level as a barn floor, and just sandy enough for agricultural purposes.

New Carlisle is beautifully situated on a hill at the southeastern extremity of this prairie, and it therefore overlooks this fertile plain. Most of the village is on section 34. It was founded by Richard R. Carlisle, a sportsman and traveler of early day, who finally died in Philadelphia. The land at this point was first owned by Bursaw (?), a Frenchman, whose wife was an Indian; after his death the property descended to his children, and it was from them that it was bought by Mr. Carlisle.

Olive township is wealthy, as we see that while 18 sections are yet untilled and even unpastured, it pays a large tax. Most of the untilled lands arc marsh or timber, and the timber and underbrush are so heavy that it seems as if it would take a man a life-time to clear an acre; but the Polanders are clearing it up fast. Fred G. Miller imported the first company of Polanders into Indiana in 1865, most of them settling in this township, in what is called the marsh timber. At the present time there are 35 families living in this timber, where in a short time they have succeeded in clearing and subduing to cultivation 20 to 80 acres apiece, with plenty more land to clear; one strip of timber in the southern part of the township surrounded by marsh, is called Long Island; and another piece of timber similarly situated is called Hog Island, on account of the great number of wild hogs which fattened themselves here in early day on the plentiful mast. Mr. Kinney relates that he and Mr. H. H. Clark once passed through this island and found two large piles of skeletons of hogs, which had piled themselves up in this manner to keep warm during a spell of severely cold weather, but froze to death.

Politically, Olive township is pretty evenly divided; but during the last war it did its duty toward putting down the Rebellion. The draft was executed here, and the township voted to raise money by taxation to fill her quota. A few men thought to resist this tax, particularly George W. Woods, who was quite obstinate. Some roughs thought they would try something else than moral suasion upon him, and they put him under a pump spout and pumped water upon him to a damaging extent. Since that time they say he has never "rebelled."

Among the prominent and wealthy citizens of this township are John Reynolds, said to be the richest man in St. Joseph county; James Reynolds, Henry H. Clark and H. B. Ranstead, who, with Mr. John Reynolds, are the largest land-holders in the township; J. H. Service and R. Hubbard, wealthy pioneers. The Messrs. Reynolds, Clark and Ranstead all together own 7,433 acres of land, a great deal of which is on the Terre Coupee Prairie. This, as before shown, is very valuable.

CHURCHES.
Methodist Episcopal.- James Armstrong was the Evangelist of Methodism in this county, influencing many persons to move from older parts of the State. He remained here as an enterprising missionary till his death, in the fall of 1834. The first Methodist society in St. Joseph county was organized at the house of Paul Egbert, on Terre Coupee Prairie. It consisted of eight individuals, and John Egbert was appointed class-leader. According to tradition among this people, the class was formed by Rev. E. Felton, of the Ohio Conference, in 1830. This class was supplied with pastors somewhat irregularly until 1834, when the work was thoroughly re-organized by Mr. Armstrong, the Presiding Elder; since that time this society has been regularly supplied.

The first Methodist house of worship in the county was erected at Hamilton, and was dedicated in May, 1841, by Rev. Aaron Wood, D. D. The first Methodist preaching at New Carlisle was by Rev. Abram Saulsberry, in 1849, then on "Byron Circuit." The first class in New Carlisle was formed in 1853, of the following members: Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Pidge, Josiah Pidge, Jacob Hopkins, James and Delilah Egbert, Mr. and Mrs. James S. White and Eliza White. Rev. A. H. Pidge was the class-leader. This year the parsonage was built, and ever since then it has been the home of the circuit preacher. The church building at this place was erected in 1858.

Since those early dates of organization, etc., many changes have, of course, taken place.

Christian Church.- Early in 1868, Elder Ira J. Chase, of Mishawaka, Ind., at the request of two or three resident disciples, began in New Carlisle a series of sermons on primitive Christianity, assisted at the first by W. M. Roe, pastor of the Christian Church at Rolling Prairie . The result was an accession of several converts to this Church, and March 29 the Church was regularly organized in the chapel hall of the New Carlisle Collegiate Institute. Arrangements for erecting a house of worship were immediately made; a very desirable location was secured, and during the winter of 1869-'70, the building was finished, a neat and tasteful structure with a seating capacity of about 260, and costing $2,500. March 13, 1870, the dedication sermon was delivered by Elder Chase. Since the organization the Church has had the following pastors: W. M. Gleason, Jesse Roe, Joseph Wickard, J. P. Lucas, M. L. Blaney and M. T. Thompson. The society has been growing in numbers and influence until now it has a membership of about a hundred. It also has a well-sustained Sunday -school.

Olive Chapel, on section 11, is a house of worship occupied by the "Church of God," "New-Lights," "Campbellites," or "Christians," as they are variously called; they prefer the last-mentioned title. This society was organized in an early day, and they have had many trials. The chapel is a neat and substantial building, 34 by 48 feet, with ceiling 16 feet high, and cost $1,900. It was dedicated Oct. 10, 1869, by Elder Summerbell, of Cincinnati, Ohio. The membership at the time of organization, Jan 1, 1841, consisted of James S. Parnell, at whose house the society was formed, J. S. Hooton, Esther Hooton, Polly Parnell, William Hooton and Jackson Hale and wife. Elder John Spray was the first preacher; William Hooton was the first elder, and he has been elder ever since. The membership at the present time numbers over 150. In 1877 Rev. S. C. V. Cunningham held a series of meetings here, which resulted in a greater accession to the membership than has ever been enjoyed at any other time. The Church is now without a minister.

The old saying that it is better to be born lucky than rich may be applied to New Carlisle. The citizens here built their waterworks in 1879, when everything was cheap. If they had waited until next year, this public improvement would have cost twice as much as it did. Likewise, they bought an $8,000 school-house for $1,500, happening to select a lucky time for the purchase. It is a two-story brick structure, 44 by 75 feet, neatly finished, and was first erected by the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1859, which failed to pay its indebtedness on the building, which was $1,500. And as another element of good fortune to the people of this municipality, a large number of people in the adjoining country added themselves to New Carlisle for school purposes, on account of this very purchase that had been made. It turned out that this building cost some of the M. E. Church members more than it would had it been built by regular taxation. For example, J. H. Service gave $500 to start it as a Methodist college, and afterward was taxed to buy it for the town. Every dollar, he says, was a good investment.

At the present time the school is in a flourishing condition, under Prof: A. E. Rowell, an old and experienced teacher; he has three assistants.

LODGES.
Masonic.- Terre Coupee Lodge, Number 204, was organized in 1856, with the following members: E. Whitlock, Abraham Pyle, A. A. Whitlock, James L. Perkins, J. H. Service, T. L. Borden, E. Bacon, J. C. Williams, E. H. Keen and R. Pierce. Mr. Pyle was chairman at the organization, and the following officers were elected: Abraham Pyle, W. N.; A. A. Whitlock, S. W.; J. L. Perkins, J. W.; E. Bacon, S. D.; J. C. Williams, J. D.; J. H. Service, Treas.; T. L. Borden, Sec.; and E. H. Keen, Tyler. This meeting was held over T. L. Borden's store, July 24, 1856, where they continued to meet until 1862, when they changed the place of meeting to a room over the store of J. H. Service; here they met until 1876, when the new brick block was erected, one-third the expense of which was defrayed by the lodge, and this society has exclusive control of the upper story, all of which, except two rooms, they lease.

The lodge is in a flourishing condition, having a membership of 69, and comprising most of the leading men of the community. Eight members are Sir Knights. George Bissell is the present Master. The lodge is strict in the execution of the laws and regulations of Masonry.

Good Templars- Olive Branch Lodge, Number 149, I. O. of G.T., was organized Jan. 4,1875, by G. W. C. T. J. J. Talbott, with the following persons as its first officers: A. T. Evans, W. C. T.; Mary Hoyt, W. V. T.; Josie Service. W. S.; Eli Miller, W. A. S.; Martha Lyda, W. Treas.; E. H. Harris, W. Fin. Sec.; John Grigg, W. M.; Hattie Flanegin, W. D. M.; Libbie Albright, W. T. G.; Thos: M. Grigg, W. O. G.; Emma Miller, W. R. H. S.; Charlotte Harris, W. T. H. S.; and Joel Harris, P. W. C. T. bThere were also 30 other members.

From Nov. 1, 1818, to Aug. 1, 1880, the membership increased from 95 to 143, and the lodge is now the second in size in the State.

ANTI-HORSE-THIEF ASSOCIATION.
The Terre Coupee Anti-Horse- Thief Association was organized in 1853 or 1854, for the purpose of protecting the property of its members against the depredations of thieves, and for detecting and apprehending parties guilty of horse-stealing. The association agrees to recover stolen property or indemnity the owner of the same, if he is a member of the society. The charter of this association expired at the end of 20 years, according to law, and it was reorganized, with the same objects and purposes, but on the plan of a mutual insurance company. They pay for stolen horses 30 days after they fail to find them, at the rate of two-thirds the value of the property. If after the payment has been made, the horse is found and recovered, it is optional with the owner whether he returns the horse or returns the money, for the horse might be damaged.

This society has been a great protection, not only to its own members, but also to every horse-owner in the community. During the 25 years of its existence, not as many as 30 horses have been stolen within their jurisdiction, and all have been recovered but two, and one of these was a two year-old colt, not gone 30 days yet at this writing. The membership is 120 strong, each "rider" being authorized to act as constable for the purposes of the association by a State law; and they seldom fail to capture every thief that dares to steal a horse in this neighborhood. At first the territory of this association was unlimited, but now it is confined to Olive and Wil1s townships in this county, and Hudson township in La Porte county. H. Reid was the first President, T. L. Borden, Secretary, and T. J. Garoutte, Treasurer; the latter has acted in that capacity ever since. The present officers are I. N. Miller, President; S. C. Lancaster, Secretary; T. G. Garoutte, Treasurer; Managing Committee-Granville Woolman, Eli Wade, Wm. P. White, H. B. Knight and Charles Ivins. Committee on Communications-J. H. Service, Juel Harris and T. G. Garoutte. Riders-T. B. Fawcette, J. G. Druliner, Wm. H. Deacon, Joseph Burden, Wm. P. Lane, L. H. Rush, H. V. Compton, Charles Ivins, D. M. Cury, Milton Thompson, John Ackerman, T. L. Borden, Eli Wade, W. W. France and James Nickerson.

WATER-WORKS.
New Carlisle has a successful system of water-work just established. When the project was first proposed in l879, there was considerable opposition; and as it required a two-thirds vote of the property holders to carry the measure through, it required skillful engineering to insure success. As the expense was the principal objection, Mr. George H. Service offered to insure the sale of bonds at par, and thus the people were encouraged to vote for the issue of $7,000 bonds, which were negotiated at par, at seven per cent., with a savings bank in Vermont, to run 15 years; and now the village has a perfect system of water-works.

NEW CARLISLE GAZETTE.
This was established as an independent newspaper, by G. H. Alward, of South Bend, and G. M. Fountain, of Mishawaka. The first number was issued Feb. 6, 1880; in size it was a six-column folio, and was enlarged to a seven-column folio on its reaching the 11th number. Aug. 20, 1880, Mr. Fountain purchased the interest of his partner and enlarged the paper still farther to all eight column sheet, and made it a Republican paper. Its growth, though rapid, has been warranted by the liberal patronage bestowed upon it by the people, especially the merchants of the place, who, with few exceptions, have done all in their power to make the paper a success.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


John Anderson, farmer and stock-raiser, sec. 25; P. O., New Carlisle; was born in Sweden Sept. 26, 1832, son of Andrew Johnson; received his education in the common schools of his native country; came to America in 1869, landing at Chicago, when he did not have a dollar; in a few weeks he carne to this county, went to work, and he now owns 255 acres of land; is Supervisor and is doing well. In politics he is a Republican. He was married in 1853 to Kate Abrison, and they have had 8 children, 7 of whom are living, 4 boys and 3 girls. Mr. A. brought his family to this country two years after his arrival. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Martin Bate, farmer and stock-raiser, sec. 31; P.O., New Carlisle; was born in Green county, O., in 1831, the son of Samuel and Harmony (Allen) Bate, subjects of the next paragraph. In 1857 he married Margaret Kinney, and they have had 4 sons and one daughter, who are all yet living. Mr. Bate owns 163 acres of land, and has enjoyed fair success in his vocation. Although not a very old man, he can be counted an early settler, as he was very young when brought by his parents to this county. Politically, he is a Democrat. His wife is a member of the M. E. Church.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Samuel Bate, a pioneer school-teacher, was born in 1801, and is the son of Joseph and Priscilla (Ayers) Bate, natives of New Jersey, the former of Welsh and the latter of English descent. He received his education in subscription schools of New Jersey, Ohio and Indiana; at the age of 18 he commenced teaching school in the neighborhood where he was reared; the undertaking was rather contrary to his wishes, and to govern the unruly boys he sent slips of paper to their parents informing upon them, who would thereupon give them a flogging. Only three cases of this kind, however, sufficed to put an end to their misdemeanors. Mr. B. had the native abilities of a successful teacher. In 1830 he married Miss Harmony Allen, a native of Virginia, a Quaker, who died in 1860; 4 of their children are still living. Mr. Bate cast his first vote for Jackson and is still a Democrat. He arrived in this county Sept. 31, 1834, at which time the Indians were numerous, but friendly. He taught school three terms after coming here, and since then has followed farming; he owns two farms, and began at the age of 75 to feel that the cares and toils of his business wore upon him.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Theodore L. Borden was born Sept. 22, 1822, in the State of New York, the son of Isaac L. and Mary Annette Borden, the former a native of New York, and the latter of Ireland. He emigrated from New York to Michigan in 1838, and from the latter State to Indiana in 1845. He received his education in New York, Michigan and Indiana, attending the high school at South Bend. His early life was spent on a farm; at 24 years of age he entered the dry-goods and grocery business, which he followed 16 years in New Carlisle; since that time he has been farming. In 1850 he married Eliza Whitlock, and they have 3 sons and 3 daughters. Mr. Borden is a Republican, a Unitarian in belief, and his wife is a member of the M. E. Church. He has been remarkably successful in business, and is now the owner of 700 acres of valuable land. He emigrated from New York to Michigan in 1838, and from the latter State to Indiana in 1845.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


F. Brown was born in this State Jan. 7, 1819, the son of William and Eva (Kingery) Brown, natives of Virginia, father of Irish and mother of German descent; was educated in a common school and by his own perseverance at home; taught school five years of his early life; followed merchandising and milling in Franklin county, this State, for 20 years; followed farming for five years; in 1876 started the mill in New Carlisle, which has three run of stone, where he is succeeding well at both custom and merchant work. In 1841 he married Lydia Hughes and they have one child living, Eva B., born in 1853 and married in 1876 to J. B. Shera, a farmer living in Ohio. Mr. Brown has been a Republican ever since the organization of his party; he has been Steward and Class-Leader in the M. E. Church at New Carlisle, of which society his wife is also a member.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Andrew J. Bryant, farmer, sec. 15; P.O., New Carlisle; was born in 1841, and is the son of David and Ruth (Antrum) Bryant, natives of Ohio, and of English descent; educated in the common schools of Ohio; came to this county in 1861; in 1864 married Gertrude McDaniel, and they are both members of the United Brethren Church; he is a Republican. In 1862 he enlisted in Co. F, 94th Ohio Infantry, and was discharged at the close of the war; he was in the battle of Murfreesborough. Mr. B. has the reputation of being an honest and industrious citizen.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Andrew J. Campbell, farmer and stock-raiser on sec. 10, was born in this State in 1830, the son of William and Sarah (Bagley) Campbell; father of North Carolina and mother of Lower Canada; she came to America when a girl. Mr. C. spent his early life at the wagon-maker's trade; received his education in the common schools of Indiana and Ohio. He was brought to this tp. in 1835 by his father. In 1855 he married Hanna J. Graves, a native of Ohio, and they have had 11 children, only 5 of whom are living. Mr. C. is a Democrat, and both himself and wife are members of the Christian Church. In 1864 he was drafted and placed in the 23d Ind. Vol. Inf., and discharged at the close of the war. He now owns 220 acres of land, is somewhat in debt, but is getting along well.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


James Catterlin, one of the early settlers of La Porte county, was born March 9, 1805, the son of Joseph and Mary (Messer) Catterlin, father a native of Scotland, and mother of Pennsylvania, and of English descent; the former was a Revolutionary soldier seven years under the command of Gen. Washington; he died in 1823 at the age of 83, and his second wife died in 1831, in her 59th year. Mr. James Catterlin, the subject of this notice, moved from Ohio to Indiana March 15, 1835, settling in Galena tp., La Porte county, where he lived on the same farm 44 years; at present he is living in New Carlisle. He has been twice married, first in 1828, to Agnes Johnston, who, 14 years afterward, died without having any children. Mr. C.ís second wife was Margaret Kyger, born in 1822, in Virginia; they were married in 1844, and have had 11 children; 3 sons and 3 daughters are living. Mr. C. has been a member of the Presbyterian Church 48 years, and all his family are members of the same Church. He was formerly a Whig and is now a Republican.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Henry H. Clark, farmer and land speculator, sec. 31; P.O., New Carlisle; was born in Warren county, Ohio, in 1816. He is the son of Thomas and Rachel (Martindale) Clark; received his education in the common schools in Warren county, Ohio, and also St. Joseph county, Ind. He has been farming most of his life and has been remarkably successful; at the present time is the owner of 1,500 acres of land. He has dealt in lands, sold and bought and traded for a great many years. He was married in 1847, to Matilda Olds, and they have had 5 children, 2 boys and 3 girls. Mrs. Clark is a member of the M. E. Church. In politics Mr. C. is a Republican; never wanted any office; he refused to serve as Justice of the Peace after he was elected; but this year he has been Supervisor of this tp. He came to St. Joseph county in 1834, and has seen many changes in this country. He can relate many amusing anecdotes of his hunting with the Indians. He was able to talk their language. He tells of a narrow escape that he had, which happened in this wise: he had two friends, young men, to stop with him for a short time; they had never seen an Indian; he consented to take them into the Indian settlement near here. They arrived in due time, found the Indian man away, and he entered into conversation with the squaw. The boys laughed to hear him talk Indian; all at once the squaw disappeared, and in a short time they saw her man pass the window with a knife in his hand. Mr. C. heard him say that he would kill the pale-faces. Mr. C. at this time began to think of his safety, and being familiar with the Indian's habits, looked over the door, and, as he expected, saw the Indian's gun loaded and capped, ready for business; and when Mr. Indian thrust in his burly form and painted cheek at the door, he was seen to halt and remove his knife from the threatening position it had assumed. There he stood, looking down the muzzle of his own gun, and the pale-faced man, Mr. Clark, at the other end. They soon settled the little affair, and were contented to let by-gones be by-gones. The boys were fully satisfied that they had met an Indian, but did not seem to like his personal appearance any too well. Mr. C. tells also of catching prairie chickens here in the prairie grass when it was wet. He would rouse them up and they would light soon; then he would pull the high grass down over them, take out the chicken, drop it into the sack, and lead for the next.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


H. V. Compton, liveryman, New Carlisle, was born in Butler county, Ohio, Sept. 18, 1829, the son of Josiah and Jane (Marise) Compton, of German descent, father a native of Ohio and mother of New York;. received his education in this State, whither his parents had emigrated when he was one year old; and when he was six years of age they moved to this county, where the subject of this sketch has ever since resided, 45 years. He has passed the most of his life on a farm, but now keeps a first class livery stable, which he owns, besides a farm of 150 acres of good land.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


James Davis, deceased, was a successful farmer. He was among the early settlers of Olive tp. He was born in Butler county, Ohio, in 1802, the son of Daniel Davis, and of Welsh descent. He received his education in the common schools in Ohio. He was married in 1824 to Jane Hull. They were the parents of 3 children, all boys, only one of whom is living at the present time. The eldest was married, and at his death, which occurred in 1871, left a wife and 7 children, 4 girls and 3 boys; the eldest girl is living with her grandmother, who is still living on sec. 8, the old homestead. The subject of this sketch died in 1873. His wife, Jane, nee Davis, is still living. She used to be a good horseback rider; when 15 years of age she rode on horseback from Florida to Ohio, and says she enjoyed the trip very much. She was born in 1807, in Hami1ton county, Ohio; came to this county in 1835, in company with her husband, James Davis, who died here in 1873. They were married in Hamilton county, O. She now owns 184 acres of land in two farms, one in Indiana, the other in Michigan. Mr. D. was a Republican in politics. Samuel, the only child living of the family, spent 20 years of his life as a telegraph operator; at the present time he is a photographer in Michigan.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


James N. Davison, farmer, sec. 15, was born in Otis, Berkshire county, Mass., April 30, 1818, and is the son of John and Anna (Gile) Davison, natives of Massachusetts, and of English ancestry; educated in the common schools of his native State; in 1842, in Pennsylvania, he married Miss Harriet Clark; of their 5 children, 2 are living; she died in 1852, and in 1855 Mr. D. married Mrs. Redding, nee Alvira Bishop, a native of Ohio. Mr. D. had but very little when he first came here, has been successful in business, and now owns 160 acres of choice land. He is a Republican, and has been Supervisor of the tp.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


L. G. Davison, born in Tennessee Dec. 8, 1844, is the son of the preceding. He received his education in the common schools in Indiana and Ohio. He was married in 1869 to Martha E. Hall, and they have 3 children living. They are both members of the Dunkard Church. He is a Republican; he came to Olive tp. in 1851, to the place where he now is living, 11 years ago; has been successful since he commenced business for himself. He is the owner of 80 acres of land on sec 15.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


R. D. Egbert was born in this county in 1852, and is the son of Asher and Elizabeth (Dunn) Egbert, natives of the State of New York, who were among the pioneers of this county; of their 4 children only 2 are living, both boys; the youngest, S. F., is living in Colorado; H. D. is living on his farm in this tp., the owner of 180 acres of land; has attended the high school at South Bend. He is not married. P.O., Terre Coupee.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Zachriah Emrick was born in Ohio Oct. 4, 1846, the son of George and Frances (Arnold) Emrick, of German ancestry; educated in the common schools; was married in 1867 to Catharine Sayring, and they have 2 sons and 2 daughters; they are living at the residence of her father, who was born in Pennsylvania March 23. 1815, and is a farmer; he owns 190 acres of land; had but one dollar when he commenced keeping house . In religions belief he is a Friend, and in general character he is very charitable. Mr. Emrick is a young man of industrious habits, is a successful farmer, and in politics a Republican.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Thomas B. Fawcett, born in Benton county, Ohio, in 1834, is the son of David and Jade (Walker) Fawcett, father a native of Ohio and of Scotch descent, and mother of Virginia and of English descent. He received his education in the common schools in Ohio; was married in June, 1858, to Evaline Baldwin, and they have 5 children, all now living. He is a Democrat in politics. In farming, Mr. Fawcett has been successful. He started without anything, and he now owns 160 acres of land. He settled on sec. 31 in 1856. He went to Colorado in 1860; in 1875 was in Nevada, and in 1860 was in California. To the latter State he took his wife and child with him. He is a very enterprising and intelligent man.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


G. W. Fountain, publisher of the New Carlisle Gazette, was born in South Bend March 20, 1857. His parents died while he was quite young, his father being killed in one of the last battles of the late war. His mother with the family of 6 children moved to Mishawaka in 1865, where she soon after died; the family have resided in the latter place until the spring of 1880, when Mr. Fountain removed to New Carlisle and established the paper which he is now publishing. A sketch of his paper is given in the chapter on the Press of St. Joseph County, and mention is also made on page 773.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


T. J. Garoutte, merchant, New Carlisle, was born in Ohio Dec. 19,1823, and is the son of James S. and Mary (Babington) Garoutte, natives of the United States, the former of Irish descent and the latter of English. The subject of this notice was educated in the common and high schools of this county . His father emigrated with his family from Ohio to this State in 1830, and in 1831 to this county, where T. J. has passed nearly all his life. His mother was frozen to death in 1831, an event which cast a gloom over all the young and scattering community of that early day. She was a midwife, and was sent for on a day so cold that even men were afraid to travel alone. Mr. Goward and his hired man came together after her; she went, and after two days the weather seemed to moderate a little, when she talked of starting home. Mr. Goward offered to accompany her, but she started alone, and sure enough, she never reached home alive. She stopped at the only house on Rolling Prairie and warmed herself, which was the last time she was seen until she was accidentally found by the mail carrier the next day. It could be seen where she had made three trials to reach the summit of the hill, all in vain. She had dismounted from her horse, started for the timber, walked about 100 yards and crawled about as much farther.

Mr. Garoutte has been a farmer the most of his life, successful, and still owns 250 acres of land, 80 acres of which he worked at $8 a month to pay for. In politics he is a Democrat; has been Tp. Trustee 20 years, and represented St. Joseph in the State Legislature in 1878. His father was a man of more than ordinary physical ability, and lived to be 84 years of age. His grandfather was educated for a Catholic priest.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Joel Harris, a prominent physician of St. Joseph county, was born in North Carolina, Mar. 30, 18l1, and is the son of Howell and Mary (Graham) Harris, of English and Scotch descent; received his education in the select schools of Tennessee and Kentucky, and in high schools, and has also obtained a thorough medical education; he has practiced medicine in Ohio and Indiana ever since 1837, 21 years in this county. In I835 he married Miss Charlotte Compton, and they have 6 children living, 5 sons and 1 daughter. Both professionally and financially the Doctor has been successful. He owns 200 acres of land in this State but not in this county; he owns his residence in New Carlisle. He is a Deacon in the Christian Church, of which denomination his wife is also a member. Politically, he is a Republican. He has served two terms as School Trustee, in this tp.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Jacob Hooton was horn in Indiana March 3, 1830; is a son of Thomas and Esther (Montommery) Hooton, natives of the South, and of English descent. Both of his grandfathers were in the war of the Revolution. He received his education in the common schools in this tp. When he was brought here he was only five years old, and he has never been out of the tp, one week since that time in his life. He is among the leading farmers and owns 370 acres of land. He was married Jan. 24, l825, to Emily Jane Taylor, and they have had 7 children, 5 of whom are now living. He and wife are members of the Christian Church. He is a Trustee and a Republican. He has a neat and substantial residence, and has made what he has by honest toil.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Henry Hostotler was born in Canada in 1841, and is the son of Joseph and Mary (Miller) Hostotler, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. He received his education in the common schools of this county. He came to America in 1843 with his parents, who settled in La Porte county, Indiana. His father died in 1859, and his mother lived till l871. He was married July 3, 1865, to Nancy McClury, and they have 7 children. In politics Mr. H. is a Democrat. He and his wife are members of the Dunkard Church. The subject of this sketch has been successfu1 as a farmer, when we consider that he started almost without anything. He is the owner of 126 acres of good land, on some of which he paid $40 per acre. He owns five head of work horses, two colts, four hogs and 50 head of cattle. His farm is well stocked.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Rosa Linda Howland was born Dec, 3, 1820, in Huron county, Ohio. She was the daughter of George and Abigail (Harrington) Ferguson, her father a native of Virginia, and her mother of New York; mother of Scotch and English descent, and father of English. She was happily married in 1844 to Benjamin Wilson, and this marriage was blessed with 5 children, only two of whom are now living, both married. Mr. Wi1son came to this county about l832, and therefore was on of the pioneers. He was a farmer and was very successful at the time of his death, which occurred in 1860. He was respected by' all who knew him. He was the owner of 480 acres of laud. Mrs. Wilson, who is now Mrs. Howland, is a member of the M. E. Church. She has been a widow the second time for severa1 years. During this time she has raised a family of 4 girls, 2 of her own and 2 of her second husband's. It seems strange to read that a lonely woman could raise 4 little girls, but Mrs. Rowland's business qualifications are good and her first husband had left her with means, so she got along quite well. She and her youngest daughter, and her daughter's husband are living on one of her farms on sec. 8, at this writing. P, O. Dayton, Mich.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


R. Hubbard, farmer and stock-raiser, sec. 20; P.O., Terre Coupee; was born in Oneida county, .N. Y., March 12, 1816, and is the son of Jonathan and Rebecca (Haven) Hubbard; his father was one of the pioneers of this county. Mr. H. came west in 1836 settling in this tp. He was married the first time to Marietta Whitlock, and they had 2 children. After her death Mr. H. married in 1875, Mrs. Mary E. Sheppard, nee Johnson, who is a member of the M. E. Church, while Mr. H. is not a strict church-goer. He is a Republican, and has been County Commissioner three terms. He owns 700 acres of land, pays taxes on $100,000, and as a farmer he has been very successful.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Andrew Kinney, farmer, sec. 35; P.O., New Carlisle; was born in Greene county, O., March 9, 1824, and is the son of Matthias and Lucila (McClone) Kinney, natives of Pennsylvania, and of English descent. He received his education in his native county, and in this county. He has been married three times, and has 3 children living, all by his second wife. For his present wife he married Nancy Devitt, nee McClure, March 30, 1569, a daughter of a pioneer. Mr. Kinney came to this county in 1833, with his parents; commenced life for himself with but limited means, but he now owns 80 acres of good land, and is a successful farmer. His father died here in 1872, and his mother in 1874; they first settled on sec. 32 of this tp.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


John S. Massey was horn in Indiana in 1843, the son of A. W. and Elizabeth (Smith) Massey, mother a native of Pennsylvania, and father of Indiana, and both of Scotch descent. He received his education in the common schools in this county; was married Dec. 19, 1855, to Mary Ann Hatfield, and they have had 4 children, all of whom are living. Mrs. M. is a native of Michigan. Mr. M. has been a successful farmer. We have an example of his farming in his wheat crop of 1879, He had 15 acres of wheat that yielded 50 bushels per acre. He owns 70 acres of land for which he paid at the rate of $100 per acre, and his neighbor has offered him $120 per acres. In politics Mr. M. is a Republican. P.O., New Carlisle.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


James McCollum, grocer and Postmaster, Terre Coupee, was born in New York Nov. 17, 1806, and is the son of James and Lucy (Print) McCollum, father of Scotch descent, and mother a native of Connecticut; early education only in the subscription schools of New York; was on a farm until 20 years of age; worked at the tailorís trade 20 years, then became a partner in a grocery at Terre Coupee, which he is still conducting; came to this county in 1840; in 1832 he married Mary Minerva Badger, and they have no children. Mrs. McC. is a member of tile P. E. Church. Politically Mr. McCollum is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Gen. Jackson; has been Postmaster 10 years, and Justice of the Peace.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Perry McDonald, farmer, sec. 3, was born in the State of New York in 1841, the son of Michael and Mary (O'Daniel) McDonald, natives of Ireland, father a pioneer in this county and killed in 1864 in the war. Perry's education was limited to the pioneer schools of this county. In 1865 he married Mary Myler, and they have one son and 2 daughters. He and his wife are members of the Christian Church, and he is a Republican. He has occupied his present residence about 10 years, and has a well-improved farm.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Dr. Thomas T. McDonald was born Nov. 5, 1832, in Clark county, Ohio, and is the son of J. B. and Sarah McDonald, the former a native of Maryland, and the latter of Kentucky. He came with his parents to La Porte county in 1836, and was principally raised on the farm and received his education in the common schools, and began teaching at the age of 22, which vocation he followed for ten years; during this time he began the study of medicine under Mr. J. M. Hunt, who died after a few months. Young McDonald pursued his studies unaided until the winters of 1863-'4 and 1864-'5, at which time he attended the Rush Medical College in Chicago. He began the practice of medicine in 1864, however, in what is now Lincoln tp., and in 1866 he came to New Carlisle, where he has been located ever since, and where he has steadily followed his profession, thus far, with reasonable success. The Dr. married Miss Hattie A. Higgins Nov. 6, 1866, a native of Ottawa county, Il1., born March 31, 1840; 5 of their 6 children are living, to-wit: Ella G., Harry H., Edith M., L. G. and Annie Lois. Dr. McDonald served as School Trustee and was elected to the office of Tp. Trustee, which office he is holding at present. Mrs. McDonald is a member of the Presbyterian Church. P.O., New Carlisle.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
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published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Rev. W. P. McKinsey was born in Rockbridge county, Va., Aug. 17; 1837; moved to this State with his father and family in 1849; joined the M. E. Church at Thorntown, Ind., Nov. 19,1858. Educated at the common schools of Virginia and Indiana, and at the Thorntown Academy, then under the presidency of Rev. C. N. Sims, D. D.; served nearly four years in the 40th Reg. Ind. Vol. Inf., in suppressing the Rebellion, first for eight months as First Surgeon of Co. A, and then for 18 months as First Lieutenant of the same Co., the most of the time in command; then for 20 months as Quartermaster of the Regiment; licensed to preach at Stockwell, Ind., in August, 1868, and the following October was sent by Rev. S. D. Cooper, P. E., as preacher in charge of Star City Circuit; has served the following Churches: Star City, one year, Fulton, one year; Hebron, two years; State Line, one year; Jamestown, one year; Westville, three years; and New Carlisle, three years. Mr. McK. was married Oct. 3, 1865, Miss Anna Cones, of Thorntown, Ind.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Fred G. Miller, farmer, sec. 4, was born in Germany in 1835, son of Samuel Miller; received his education in the high schools of Germany; came to La Porte county, Ind., in 1854, since which time he has been farmer and contractor. In 1857 he married Amelia G. Gulback, and of their 9 children 7 are living, 4 boys and 3 girls. Mr. M. has been successful in business; at the present time he owns a saw-mill and 264 acres of land; has owned 1,000 acres, and been more extensively engaged in the land business than now; has sold his timber mostly to railroad companies; in 1865 he brought a number of Polanders into this section of the country, and is still importing them; there are now about 35 families of them in this tp., industriously clearing the marsh timber, and having farms of 20 to 80 acres each. Mr. M. is a Democrat, and he and his wife are members of the German Reform Church.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Isaac Newton Miller, farmer, sec. 3, was born in this county in German tp., Nov. 3, 1835, and is the son of William and Mary Miller; the former a native of Virginia, and the latter of Indiana, who started the "Miller Settlement" in German tp. in 1830; Mr. M. became a wealthy and influential man, and served two terms in the Legislature of this State. Mr. I. N. Miller received his education in the common schools and Wabash College; is a remarkably successful farmer, as was 4is father, and has the best peach orchard in this tp.; he is a cheerful, free-hearted and obliging gentleman, and his neighbors say that he makes more money than any of them. He is a brother of Maj. Gen. Miller, of California. He ran a mill in South Bend two years, and did not succeed well; he then doubled his diligence, went to farming, and at present owns 240 acres of land; for the last five years he has raised 120 acres of wheat, which has averaged 20 bushels per acre. March 25, 1858, he married Miss Ritter, a daughter of Jacob Ritter, who also settled here in 1830. They have 3 sons and one daughter. Mr. M. is a thorough Republican, and was president of the Garfield and Arthur club in New Carlisle.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Jens Morton, born in Denmark in 1836, is the son of Jenson Morton; parents natives of Denmark; commenced to learn the blacksmith's trade while in Denmark; emigrated to America when 17 years old, and completed his trade at La Porte, Indiana. His education is limited to the common schools in Denmark. He was married in 1863 to Sarah Findley, a native of Indiana. Her mother was one of the pioneers of this county, settled as early as 1836. They have only one child, Freddie Morton, born in 1865. Mr. and Mrs. M. are members of the Christian Church at New Carlisle. In politics, Mr. M. is a Republican. He came to this county in 1875; was in Colorado three years. He owns 80 acres of good land, which he has himself earned.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


H. M. Nickerson, farmer and stock raiser on sec. 15, was born in Warren county, Ohio, in 1833. He is the son of Benjamin and Maria (Williams) Nickerson, of English descent; received his education in the common schoo1s in St. Joseph county, Ind.; emigratrd with his parents to this county in 1837, and has lived here ever since. From the age of about 16 to 18 he worked at blacksmithing. He was married in 1855 to Rebecca Compon, and of their 12 children, 9 are living. He and his wife are both consistent members of the Christian Church. He has been a Trustee; in politics he is a Democrat; has held the office of Supervisor for six years. He has been a successful farmer, and is the owner of 175 acres of land.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Hurtain Proud, farmer, sec. 27, was born in Ohio Nov. 7, 1831, the son of the next mentioned; was brought to this county when four or five years old, by his parents; educated in the common schools of this county; married the first time to Julia Haines, June 16, 1861, and they had 3 sons and one daughter; she died in February, 1877, and Mr. P. subsequently married the widow of Frazy Carr. Mr. P. is a Democrat, and is now School Director in his district.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Joseph Proud, farmer, sec. 22, was born in Ohio April 19, 1808, and is the son of Peter and Abigail (Turner) Proud, natives of New Jersey, and of German descent; educated in the subscription schools of Warren county, Ohio; moved to this vicinity in 1835, where he has lived ever since. June 5, 1829, he married Harriet Woolsey in Warren county, Ohio, and of their 12 children, 8 are living, 4 boys and 4 girls, all married except the 4th son, Joseph, who is living on his father's farm and does most of the business; his father is a little deaf. All the children are living in this State except Jesse, who is married and lives in Michigan. Mr. P. is a Democrat.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Henry B. Ranstead, farmer and stockraiser, sec. 13; P.O., Terre Coupee; was born in this State in 1829, the son of Henry A. and Anna (Bell) Ranstead, father a native of Massachusetts, and mother of New York; the latter is still living, at the age of 84. The subject of this sketch was brought to this county in 1834 by his parents; was educated in the common schools of this State; has followed farming all his life. In 1850 he married Jane Fox, and they have had 5 children, 3 of whom are living. Mr. R. owns 1,000 acres of land in this county, 700 of which is good farming land; he has also a fine residence, good out-buildings, etc. He is a Freemason and a Republican.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Prof. Albert E. Rowell, principal of the New Carlisle public school, was born in the State of New York July 22, 1823, and is the son of Asahel and Phoebe (Lunt) Rowell; received his education in the common schools and Monroe (N. Y.) .Academy; he was endeavoring to obtain a regular col1egiate education, when the death of his father, just before he was ready to enter college, compelled him to take the responsibility of the family; his father was a farmer and teacher; commenced teaching at 17 years of age and followed the profession until he was 30. Prof. R. has been a diligent student all his life; five of his brothers and sisters are living and have all been teachers; he has taught regularly every year since he was 32, namely, in New York, Michigan, Illinois and this State. He taught at Battle Creek, Mich., nine years in one building; indeed, his experience and qualifications are so great that many parties propose him for State Superintendent of Public Instruction; in New York he was a Superintendent of schools, and in Michigan, School Inspector.

He was married the first time to Celinda Eckler, and they have had 2 children; one is married and resides in the State of New York. Mrs. R. died, and subsequently Prof. R. married Harriet L. Beman; they are members of the Congregational Church, in which denomination the professor has acted as Deacon. Mrs. R is also teaching in the same building where her husband is engaged.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


George H. Service, banker, merchant and grain-dealer, New Carlisle, was born in this county in 1848, and is the son of J. H. and Sarah (Flanegan) Service; received his education in the high schools of this county; was married in 1846 to Mary J. Hews, a native of this State, and they have 2 daughters: Clara Lucille and Anna L. Mr. S. is a very prominent business man; last year, 1879, he bought and shipped a million bushels of wheat, besides attending to his mercantile and banking business, buying other grain, etc. He was recently very active in establishing the water-works of New Carlisle, and many of his opponents have since seen the wisdom of his course. See page 770. Mr. S. is a Republican, a prominent Freemason. and a member of the Baptist Church.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


J. H. Service, banker, New Carlisle, was born in the State of New York Nov. 15, 1812, and is the son of Philip and Clara (Hall) Service, natives also of New York, father of German and mother of English ancestry; received his education in the common schools of his native State, followed the farm with his parents until 22 years of age, and then settled in New Carlisle, where he has accumulated a handsome fortune. He started in life as a poor boy, worked at brick-making two years, kept store in New Carlisle 30 years, except 1843-'6 he was in Buchanan; the last four years he has followed banking. He is one of the most influential men of the community, and has represented this county one term in the Legislature, but he usually declines public offices, preferring the energies of a business life. In 1847 he married Sarah A. Flanegan, and they have 2 sons and 2 daughters, all married except the younger son, who is still at home.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
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published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Peleg Slocum, deceased, was a prominent farmer in this tp,; he was born July 28, 1807, in New York, of German ancestry; he had good mechanical abilities, and worked at the carpenter's and shoemaker's trades and at farming, in the latter of which he was very successful; he owned 400 acres of good land here at one time, and even more. Aug. 29, 1840, he married Mary Egbert, daughter of Cornelius and Rachel Egbert, pioneers of this county, and of their 8 children 5 are living and married. Mr. S. was politically a Democrat, and a faithful man; died June 24, 1862. Mrs. S. is living on the home place with her youngest daughter.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
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published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


David Smith, farmer, Sec. 8; P.O., Dayton, Mich.; was born in Ohio in 1821, the son of Jonathan and Nancy (Miller) Smith, natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent, and members of the Dunkard Church; father a successful farmer, worth at one time $30,000. David was educated in Portage tp., and in 1869 he settled in this tp.; has been a farmer all his life, with success, as he has raised his fortune from nothing to 315 acres of land, 200 of which is the very finest. In 1843 he married Permelia Jane Massey, and of their 5 children 3 are living; she died in 1857, and in 1859 Mr. Smith married Mary Jane Gates, and they have 4 children living. Mrs. G. is a member of the Dunkard Church, and Mr. G. in politics is a Republican.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Henry Smith, farmer and stock-raiser, sec. 20; P.O., New Carlisle; was born in this county in 1850, the son of Jonathan and Susannah J. (Runion) Smith, of German ancestry; educated in the common schools; was married in 1872 to Susannah Gogley. Mr. Smith owns 226 acres of land, and in politics is a Democrat. His father, a pioneer in this county, is still living, a wealthy farmer, having owned at one time as much as 800 acres of land. He is a liberal man.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
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published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Job Smith, born in New Jersey in 1813; he is the son of Job and Rachel (Rodgers) Smith, father of English and mother of German and English descent. They were natives of New Jersey. He never attended school a day in his life, but can read, and says he could have made himself a good scholar after he was grown up. His mother died in 1815. When he was 14 years old he started out to make his own way through the world, but was to give his father all he made except what it took to clothe him till he was 21 years old, which was about one half of what he could make. He came to Indiana when he was 19 years old, and worked in the country the first year; the next year he worked for John Rush; the next summer came to Terre Coupee Prairie, where he has lived ever since. He was married in 1834, to Elizabeth Lancaster; they commenced to keep house with $12 worth of household furniture, and slept on a one-legged bedstead made by building in the corner of the house. They have one child, a girl, married and living in Missouri at present. Mrs: S. died in 1844. He was again married in 1851, to Mrs. Little, whose maiden name was Martha Ann Green, and they have 9 children, 5 of whom are married. Mr. S. is a farmer, and owns 255 acres of good land. He was here when all the wheat was cut by hand, all grass cut with a scythe, single-shovel plows, all the houses made of logs, clapboard roof and puncheon .floors; if a man was more than two days building, he would be called lazy or very slow. He was formerly a Whig, but is now a Republican in politics, has been Supervisor; never wore any clothing except home-made till he was 17 years old. It was 25 years after he came to this county before he saw any of his relatives, then he went back among them. He is a liberal and kind-hearted man, and is much respected by his neighbors.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


James Swank, born in the State of Ohio, in 1844, is the son of Peter and Elizabeth (Cramer) Swank, mother native of New Jersey, and father of Pennsylvania. He came to this county in 1850, and lived here until his death, which occurred in 1880. Mr. S. received his education in the common schools in this county, is a farmer on sec. 15, where he owns a farm of 40 acres of land. He was married in 1868 to Martha Fisk, a member of the United Brethren Church. They have 2 children. Mr. S. is a Democrat. P. O., New Carlisle.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
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published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


E O. Taylor was horn Dec. 9,1832, in Champaign county, Ohio, and is the son of Levi and Sarah Taylor, the former a native of Virginia, and latter of New York. His grandfather was one of Ohio's first settlers. Mr. T. was reared on the farm to the age of 16 or 18, at which time he began clerking and continued this business until he became of age, when he and a Mr. Parker formed a partnership in the dry-goods business at North Louisburg, Ohio, and after a short time they moved their stock of goods to Kingston, where they took a third partner, H. B. Evans, and followed merchandising business for about one year, when they removed their store to Allen county, where Mr. Taylor sold his interest and began farming, which he followed in summer and clerked in winter; this he followed from 1854 to 1858, at which time he migrated to Berrien county, Mich., where he resided until Nov., 1864, at which time he located in this place and opened a store consisting of groceries, provisions, flour, salt, queen's-ware, glassware, stone-ware, wooden-ware, notions, confectioneries, school books and stationery. Mr. Taylor married Miss Sarah O. Harris Dec. 16, 1856, who was born March, 1839, in Green county, Ohio, and they had 6 children, to wit: Charles L., Emma O., Annie B., Edward W., Daisy D. and Harris E. Mrs. T. is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Taylor has held the office of Town Treasurer for 14 years, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He owns 123 acres of land, besides his town property. P.O., New Carlisle.

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History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Eli Terrill was born April 11, 1844, on sec. 30, this tp., where he is living at the present time. He is the son of Nathaniel B. and Sarah Ann (Garrett) Terrill, natives of Ohio, mother of German descent, father of English. He received his education in the common schools in the district where he now lives, and has chosen the vocation of his father, that of farming. He was married in 1871 to Sarah E. Lamb, a native of this county. This union has been blessed with 4 children, 2 of whom are living, one boy and one girl. He is a Republican in politics; is a successful farmer, owning- 223-1/3 acres of land.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Eli Wade, fanner and stockman, sec. 28; P.O., New Carlisle; was born in Ohio Oct. 12, 1830, and is the son of John and Mary (Jennings) Wade, natives of England. The subject of this sketch is a self-made man, having never attended school more than 20 days in his life. In 1850 he married Rebecca Shreader, and they have a family of 10 children, 4 sons and 6 daughters. In 1855 he emigrated from Ohio to Indiana, and in 1859 to this county, where he has done well, financially. He and his wife are members of the M. E. Church, in which denomination ht has been steward. In politics he is a Democrat. He has followed farming all his life, in which occupation he has been successful; he now owns 180 acres of land.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


D. G. Warren was born in Ohio Nov. 3, 1833, the son of D. R. and Sarah (Graham) Warren, mother a native of 0hio and of Irish descent, and father of Maryland and of English descent. He received his education in the common schools of Indiana. He was married Jan. 2, 1867, to Eliza A. White, whose parents were among the early settlers of this county. In politics Mr. Warren is a Democrat, and he is a Freemason. Mr. and Mrs. Warren have also spent five or six years of their married life in Iowa, where they worked hard and were financially successful, but moved back for the sake of being near her parents. Their farm is on sec. 22, and consists of 80 acres, mostly under a high state of cultivation.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Samuel Wenger was born in Darke Co., O., in 1841; is the son of Joseph and Lydia (Isenhouser) Wenger, of German descent. He received his education in the common schools of Ohio; is not married; in company with his mother and sister he owns a farm of 135 acres, on sec. 2. He enlisted in the army twice during the Rebellion, the first time in the 152d Ohio National Guards, and the second time, for one year, in the 187th Ohio Vol. Inf., and served till the close of the war. He is a Republican. He carne to St. Joseph county in 1866.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Asher White was born in New Jersey Dec. 7, 1814, and is the son of Asher and Mary (Lippincott) White, natives also of New Jersey, and of English descent; has attended school but six weeks in his life, but obtained a fair education from his mother. He has been married three times, and is also his present wife's third husband. For his first wife he married Barbara Ketring; for his second, Jemima Druliner, by whom he had one son and one daughter; the son is keeping hotel in New Carlisle; and for his third wife Mr. White married Adaline Huntington. At present they live on sec. 23. Mr. White is a farmer, and owns 100 acres of land here and 320 near Kankakee, all good land. Coming here in 1830, he must be counted one of the earliest pioneers, and has been a steady resident here ever since. Politically, he is a Republican, and he has held the office of Trustee several terms.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


David White was born March 17, 1812, in Monmouth county, N. J., son of Asher and Mary White, natives of New Jersey; was reared on the farm; went to Ohio, where he drove a stage five years, and settled in this tp. about 1838; in 1840 he married Miss Minta A. Copper, who was born in Warren county, Ohio, in 1823, and they have had 5 children: John, Sarah, :Marshall F., Martha Ann and George W. Mr. and Mrs. W. are members of the Christian Church. P.O., New Carlisle.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


John D. White, hotel-keeper in New Carlisle, was born in La Porte county, this State, June,15, 1841, and is the son of Asher and Jemima (Druliner) White, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter of Ohio, and of German descent; was educated in the common schools of La Porte county; has followed farming mostly during life, and principally upon his father's farm. In 1873 he married Catharine Gaul, and they have 2 sons, John M., born Feb. 26, 1875, and Henry M., Oct. 31, 1877. Aug. 19, 1864, Mr. White enlisted in the 11th Minnesota Infantry, and was discharged June 26, 1865, at Gallatin, Tenn.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Granville Woolman, farmer and stock-raiser, sec. 23; P.O., New Carlisle; is a son of Joseph and Rebecca (Allen) Woolman, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter of Virginia, and both of English ancestry. The subject of this sketch received his education in the common schools of Ohio and Indiana; came to this county in 1834; was married in 1847 to Mary Whitaker, and they had 7 children. Mrs. W. died, and Mr. W., in 1877, married Sarah Jane Zigler, a member of the M. E. Church. In politics Mr. W. is a Republican. In stock-farming he makes sheep-raising a specialty; for the last five years he has clipped on an average 500 sheep, and has received good prices.

History of St. Joseph County, Indiana
Chicago, Chas. C. Chapman & Co.
published in 1880
History of Saint Joseph County
Olive Township


Deb Murray