In March 1809 John Francis Dufour left the First Vineyard and came down the Kentucky river in some kind of a boat to the mouth and the Ohio being high some of his friends in New Switzerland came down to help him up with the boat which contained all his moveable goods, his wife Polly Dufour (who is still living at the advanced age of 87 years) and his son (Perret Dufour) a child of 18 months old. On reaching the mouth of Indian creek there arose a storm and fearing the boat might sink his wife and child were put on shore and some of the heavy articles among which was a hand mill were thrown overboard.

He built a cabin about 20 feet long by about 14 wide, one story and a half high, with round logs which were afterwards "scutched" down on the inside-the logs were cut in the immediate vicinity of the spot where the cabin was raised so that when the "raising" took place the logs were near enough to be carried. That cabin stood on the lot at the corner of Market and Main Cross Streets, on the spot where William Archers kitchen stands. Into this cabin he moved with his wife and son, and turned his attention to clearing more land, planting more vineyard and raising a crop.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


In 18121 Amie Dufour the youngest of the Dufour Brothers who had been left behind to complete his education came to the colony of New Switzerland. During the Voyage across the Atlantic the vessel on which he embarked was captured by a British cruiser, and in consequence was detained many months before reaching the United States. He was finally landed at Boston and not having funds sufficient to defray his travelling expences by stage he set out from Boston on his Journey to the West, on foot travelling from Boston to Pittsburg on foot often at night sleeping in a Barn. Arriving at his sisters Morerod, he remained there for some years. He assisted in making and laying up the Brick of the dwelling house still standing on the Morerod farm near Vevay.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Among the early traders down the river were George Turner who lived on the opposite side of the river, the father of Robert and John Turner, who made yearly trips down the river. One fall Mr. Turner bought many wild turkeys -cut the breast out put them in Barrells and made a brine to keep them.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


In 1812 Hiram Ogle, the father of Achillis & Hiram Ogle came to the neighborhood of Vevay and settled on Indian Creek immediately below Griffith Dickason. He contracted with John David Dufour to clear some land in the Ohio river bottom opposite the Island above Vevay. He cleared for him under that contract ten or twelve acres and a two story hewed loghouse was built on that land. The house stood somewhere near where the barn of Mrs. Jagers now stands. Mr. Ogle and his neighbor Dickason, became rivals in raising corn; for one, two or perhaps three years Mr. Dickason raised more corn than Mr. Ogle. Ogle then took an oath that he would not shave until he raised more corn than Dickason and he kept that oath, for the writer recollects to have been at Ogle's at a corn husking the year that Ogle raised more corn than Dickason. At that corn husking, which was during the day time, there was much fun and frolic among all present, for the girls of the neighborhood had met for a quilting and a dance was in expectancy in the evening. A few days after the husking and quilting, Ogle happening in town was asked which raised the most corn, he or Dickason, when he replied "by G-d I did, donít you see I have shaved."

Some time about these times Ogle was at Robert McKay's at a corn husking, and some persons from the neighborhood of Port William, Ky., were also there. A quarrel was commenced between some of the Kentuckians and McKay and a neighbor during which each party said what they could do, as was usual in quarrels. The Kentuckians bantered the Indianians to meet them on the other side of the river and they would fight it out. The banter was accepted. McKay called on Ogle (who was a very large and stout man) to go over with them to have the fight. Ogle said he would go. McKay said they would get Noah Pritchet to go over too (Pritchet was a very large and stout man), for, said McKay, "he is a big fellow, and that will scare the Kentuckians, although Pritchet is a d-d coward." These three, McKay, Ogle, Pritchet, with several others, went over at the appointed time, and it was said that there was no fight, for the Kentuckians were afraid to fight such powerful men as McKay, Ogle, and Pritchet. Mr. Ogle was the contractor for building the first Jail in the County, in 1814.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Johnson Brown came to this part of the state about the time William Cotton came, but returned to Kentucky. He came back again in a few years, married one of William Cotton's sisters; took the fever and ague; recovering he returned to Kentucky again-returned again in 1814, lived for some time in the house owned by the Pleasant heirs, at the corner of Walnut and Pike Streets which then belonged to David McCormick - he moved to Long Run and lived for many years on a part of the School Section near Siebenthals mill, where he manufactured powder - for many years the only powder used by the hunters of his neighborhood for many miles around. At his house, the hunters, when on a squirrel hunt would meet to get the powder to be used and to count the scalps. He was justice of the peace in Craig Township for many years. For some years previous to his death he resided in Jefferson County west of Moorefield. At the age of 103 or 104 he could with his rifle shoot a squirrel in the tallest tree; in that respect he was a remarkable man. He died some four or five years since in the 106th or 108th year of his age. He was the father of Samuel Brown of Jefferson County, Joseph and Ralph Brown of this county, and Several daughters.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


In 1815 George G. Knox the father of Robert A. George P. and James Knox, came to reside in Vevay, he having sometime in 1814 purchased the lot at the S. E. corner of Pike and Vineyard streets, and contracted for the building of a log residence, which is still standing on the spot where built. He came from Frankfort Ky where he had been carrying on the Cabinet making business which he continued after coming to Vevay for many years. He was a good workman and no doubt there are in families in this county pieces of furniture of his make. He served as Treasurer of the county for several years. At one time while he had his shop in a log house that stood about where the frame house now owned by Abner Clarkson on Market street stands, he together with two or three other mechanics and Doctor John Mendenhall were working on a perpetual motion [machine] which they were constructing and which was kept a secret. The project failed.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Solomon Stow the father of U. H. and Shilometh Stow, came to the county about the year 1820 and resided in Vevay for some time. There were several brothers. Mr. Stow went out into the neighborhood of Printers Retreat, where he remained some years, during which he had established the reputation of a first class barn builder - he having put up the second hay barn built in the county, Cyrus Hatch having put up the first and in a few years there were many good frame barns through that part of the County. Having entered or bought the lands where U. H. and Shilometh Stow now reside, he built on it and commenced improving the lands, and putting up substantial barns. After his death, his sons Uzial H. and Shilometh, continued cultivating and improving the lands, which are now the best cultivated and arranged farms in the county. They have turned their attention to fruit culture, and from their orchards for the last three or four years the citizens of Vevay and the Country round about have been supplied with choice peaches. The Brothers Stow are among our most valued and enterprising farmers, and engage in every enterprize that has in view the furnishing of luxuries and necessaries, to suit the tastes and fancies of the good liver, or the epicure.

This winter of 1875-76 has been so mild, that but few persons having ice houses have been so fortunate as to have the ice to fill them. Yet Mr. U. H. Stow (although ice froze only two or three inches thick) has by his ingenuity, filled his ice house with ice Eight inches thick from a pond on his farm.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


In 1816 Dr. Joshua Haines, of Rising Sun; Dr. Martin, of New Liberty, Ky; and Samuel Merrill, of Vevay; then of Corydon, and lastly of Indianapolis, three young men seeking a home in the west, left their New England home and journeyed westward. The latter of these, Samuel Merrill, located at Vevay. In 1817 Mr. Merrill was admitted to practice law in the Courts of Switzerland County. When he came to the County he had not an over supply of this worlds goods, but he applied himself to his profession, taught school, and was soon appointed lister of the taxable property of Switzerland County, and he is known to have said he had no horse, and needed all the money he would receive for his services. He actually undertook and completed taking the list of taxable property of the county, travelling over the whole county, which then included Ross Township (or the horn as it was termed) which extended up to or near Olean, now in Ripley county, on foot. He was afterwards successfull in the practice of the law and was elected to represent the County in the Legislature of the State, while the seat of government was at Corydon. As a candidate for representative at one time Daniel Haycock a revolutionary soldier was his opponent, and by some means, in Ross Township, a man by the name of Laycock was voted for instead of Haycock, which was the cause of Merrills election . As the votes of Laycock added to Haycocks would out number the votes cast for Mr. Merrill, - it was found out afterwards that those who voted for Laycock in Ross township thought he was a candidate voted for all over the county.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Benjamin Drake who was proprietor of New York now Florence had a Brother Robert Drake, who married a sister of Heathcoat Picket - lived in Plum Creek for some time removed to Arnolds Creek and came to Pleasant Township and purchased part of Section 16, or the School Section - while living on Plum Creek in the year 1800 he had a daughter born who is now living and is 76 years of age. She is no doubt the oldest person now living in the County born within its bounds. She is the mother of Asa Newton.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


In Feb 1814 Henry Hannas Came to the County, with his family consisting of his wife, son William and three daughters. He rented of John Francis Dufour the farm on Indian Creek where George Tandy lived so long. There was about 12 acres cleared in the Creek bottom, which was planted in corn and cultivated entirely by William Hannas - a good crop of corn was raised by him although in June of that year there was a rise of the Ohio the backwater running up the Creek, inundating the Creek bottoms - which killed all the corn on the bottoms below - but Hannas' corn was not hurt much by the water which was attributed to the fact that the land was not broken up, only "listed" and planted. William Hannas was born in Garrard County Kentucky on the 18th of September 1797 and died near Moorefield and was able to ride to Vevay and transact his business until his death 1881. Mr. Hannas relates that on the night of the 4th day of April 1814 there fell a snow 12 inches deep which was measured by Hiram Ogle on a plank at the saw mill that stood on Indian Creek on the land now owned by John Bakes.

In the fall of 1814 Mr. Hannas removed to the land on which John F. Cotton now resides, and in 1820 built a horse mill which did a good deal of grinding for the surrounding country.

There came to the county with the Hannas Family one Thomas Evans, who settled the farm once owned by Walter Scott, which Mr. Scott bought of the Evans heirs.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Robert Bakes the father of John Bakes built in early days a mill on Long Run on the Scite of Ben. F. Siebenthals mill which had a very large wheel and the water was led along the side of the hill to where the wheel received the water. This mill did a good business for many years while there was water sufficient to run it. During the summer months very frequently there was very little if any water in the Creek. If clouds should rise in the west and show signs of rain, and the Clouds passed, and no rain fall so as to raise the creek, it is said that Bakes charged Rous (who had the horsemill on the hill) with having a long pole with some charm attached to the end of it that he raised in such a manner as to divide the clouds, and turn the rain in such a direction that it would not supply Bakes' mill with water so that he (Rous) would get the grinding to do for his horse mill.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


In 1815 or 1816 a family by the name of Vairin came to the neighborhood of Vevay, purchased a piece of land of Louis Gex Oboussier being now part of the farm owned by J. J. P. Schenck in his life time. The family consisted of the father and mother and three sons, Justus, Augustus and Julius. Justus was married to Miss Victoir Helvetia Gex on the 12 [th] day of December 1817 by Elishea Golay Justice of the peace. They had one child a son named John Peter. Mr. Vairins wife died and he was married again on the 9th October 1824 to Miss Sarah Wright by John Francis Dufour associate Judge. Mrs. Vairin died some years since leaving Two sons and four daughters - the last named sons and his sisters, are the inheritors of the large tract of land in Craig Township, which was purchased many years since in the name of Mary Wright, a sister of Mr. Vairins last wife; there being no other heirs but these children of Mr. Vairin by his wife Sarah.

The two sons of Mr. Vairin are in business in New Orleans the daughters are residing in Owensboro, Ky near which place they and the brothers & half brother own a farm which descends to them through the father.

Augustus Vairin was married to Miss Susan S. Pernet, on the 5 [th] of October 1818 by Elisha Golay Justice of the peace went to New Orleans, died and Shortly after his widow died leaving one Son Augustus who was in Vevay three or four years since, and was at that time with his cousin at Owensboro Kentucky.

Julius Vairin went to New Orleans many years ago got into business made a fortune, died leaving it to his brother Justus.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Accordingly in May 1821 Mr. John J. Simon, his wife and only child Zelia C. left Neville in the Canton of Berne on their Journey to America, descended the Rhine to a seaport in Holland, where they embarked on a vessel and after a voyage of three months or more, and being among Icebergs - at one time lying alongside of one for sometime, in company with four other vessels, the passengers visiting the several vessels over the ice - and had balls, or dancing parties on the ice they finally in the month of August arrived at Hudsons bay, where remaining a few days they procured three small boats, in which they ascended Nelsons river to lake Winnipeg - then along and across the lake to the mouth of the Red River of the North Thence up Red River a distance of Eighteen or Twenty miles to Fort Gary. The river closed with ice and navigation was suspended soon after their arrival at fort Gary and remained closed untill in Mayor June following, so they remained during the winter, during which time they spent nearly all their means. They paid Eight dollars per bushel for wheat, which was dried by the fire and ground on a coffee mill which is at present in the possession of the daughter now in Vevay - potatoes Eight dollars per bushel-maple sugar two dollars per pound, salt one dollar per quart tobacco two dollars per pound, and as Mr. and Mrs. Simon both used Snuff, they bought plug tobacco dried it by the fire and rubbed it fine, for use. Finding that they could not live there, in June 1822 they left fort Gary, and proceeded up the river to Pembina. The river being low the Chippewa and Souix Indians being at war it was not deemed safe to continue their journey in the boat by the river - so they hired two horses and carts at three dollars per day, and men to hunt, to keep them supplied with provisions, they having provided themselves with sugar and coffee at Pembina as they were forced to travel among the Indians. One of the horses attached to one of the carts was killed by the Indians, so one of the carts had to be abandoned, the balance of the Journey with one horse and cart was accomplished, arriving at Lake Travers[e] where they remained some time, (they being the first white women who crossed the prairie). The several tribes of Indians were collected at the time at Lake Traverse to receive their annuities from the United States, which was being paid to them at that place, it was deemed unsafe for the party to continue their Journey until the Indians had separated and returned to their own settlements. After the dispersion of the Indians they proceeded on their journey, and arriving at the Saint Peters (now Minnisota) river, two canoes were built in which they and their goods were placed, and they descended the river to the mouth - along the Saint Peters river from where they took the canoes to the mouth there was but two trading posts, one occupyed by a person named Green, the other by a person named Preston. They left for Fort Snelling with letters of recommendation to the Indian agent, or commandant of the Fort. They arrived at the Fort and were introduced to Colonel Snelling. It being late in the fall Mr. Simon was advised to remain during the winter, which he did. During the winter Mr. Simon's daughter instructed the daughters of Colonel Snelling in the French language. During their stay at Fod Snelling the steam Boat Virginia, a Stern wheel boat, with supplies for the fort was expected to arrive. It had been known for three weeks that the boat was to arrive, so even the Indians became anxious to see the much talked of Steam Boat. On the arrival of the boat the landing was crowded with soldiers from the fort and Indians from the neighborhood. After the boat was moored to the shore, she commenced blowing off steam, which so frightened the Indians, that they threw themselves to the ground as though their legs were cut off then they decamped as though some foul fiend was pursuing them.

In due time after the opening of the navigation Mr. Simon his wife and daughter shipped on a Keel boat for Saint Louis. In descending the Mississippi from Fort Snelling to Saint Louis it was observed that Scarcely any timber had been cut along the river bank and that but few houses were to be seen - from fort Snelling to Prairie du Cheine [Chien] no building were seen - one was standing where Dubuque is now located.

They arrived safely at Saint Louis where they remained a short time - shipped on a Keel boat at Saint Louis for Shippingport Ky, were in Saint Louis on the 4th of July - made the trip from Saint Louis to Shippingport (the cooking all being done during the trip on the keel boat) in a little over one month landing at Shippingport in August. At Louisville Mr. Simon his wife and daughter took passage on the steamer "Eliza" for Vevay, and landed at Mr. Morerods just at the lower end of Vevay in August 1823. Five weeks after their arrival at Vevay Mr. Simon being taken sick died leaving his wife and daughter with only 50 cents in money among Strangers in a strange land - but among those strangers they found tender hearted people and hospitable friends in the family of Mr. Morerod. Mrs. Simon and her daughter were left alone, the daughter being in her 16th year turned her attention to teaching French and sewing as a means of supporting herself and her mother. In the year 1828 that daughter was married to Frederick L. Grisard and are yet both living and the parents of Rudolph F. Grisard Frederick L. Grisard Jr. of Vevay, James S. Grisard of Cincinnati O. and three daughters who are married. Mrs. Simon died on the 26th day of Deer 1856 in the 87th year of her age.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


The children of Mr. Morerod lived in this county. The eldest Henriette L. was born on the home farm adjoining Vevay in 1804 and was the Second child born in the Swiss colony - in 1824 or 1825 - she was married to Rodolph Morerod, her own cousin, who some few years later together with the members of the Swiss artillery Company were firing the cannon in commemoration of the marriage of Edward Patton, to the daughter of George Craig - and by a premature discharge of the gun so injured him that he died a few days after, leaving his bereaved widow and a little son now Doctor Eugene R. Morerod of Nevada City Missouri - Mrs. Morerod some years later Married John F. Tandy - she was well known by the ladies of Vevay and Surrounding Country as a good dress maker and modiste. She died during the present Spring of 1876 - She became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Vevay during the great revival in 1841-of which she continued a consistent and energetic membe r- contributing of her labor and means to promote the welfare of the church and she will be missed by none, so much as by the members of that church, with whom she worshipped for about thirty five years - she was a kind and generous friend, ready at all times to attend the bed side of the sick, and do all in her power to relieve, the sick, the suffering, and those who were called upon to mourn, departed friends. She was in every respect a consistent and devoted christian and died in the Hope of meeting that reward which is reserved for the people of God.

The second Daughter Lucy Detraz has lived so long in this Community that her life is her best history. Of The third Daughter Louisa Golay wife of Constant Golay the same may be said as of Mrs. Detraz.

The fourth daughter Mrs. Julia LeClerc proprietress of the LeClerk house, is widely known and respected. The fifth daughter Mrs. Josephine Hill resides in Arkansas.

The two sons Aime and Rodolph or John R. which is his proper name are and were well known to the residents of Switzerland County.

John R. Morerod was Sheriff of this County for two years and Treasurer of the County for two terms of two years each.

Mrs. Lucy Detraz was relating to the writer a short time since, her recollections of Lorenzo Dow preaching in this Section of the Country. She states that Lorenzo Dow preached in Vevay at a very early day perhaps in 1814 or 1815 and again about the year 1817 or 1818 - the writer has a distinct recollection of a very eccentric person preaching in Vevay in 1814 the year that the town was illuminated on account of McDol1oughs victory over the British during the war of 1812, and again in the Court house during a Session of the Circuit court and it is his impression that, that was during the fall term of the Court in 1817. The recollections of Lorenzo Dows Preaching in Vevay by the writer are that he was a very eccentric man whether in the social circle or in the pulpit.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Sometime about the year 1835 the family of the Keeneys came to the county, the father and his son William J. Keeney made great numbers of scythe snaths and sold them throughout the County and went occasionally to towns along the river with them - the writer has purchased many of them while in Business from 1835 to 1842. In 1839 on one of the excursions of the father Keeney and his son William J. Keeney, on the river they were floating quietly down the Stream near Vevay Island, in a small open flat Boat, when an ascending Steamer ran over their small craft the father was drowned but William being a good Swimmer dove under the steamer and came off without the loss of life- this was in 1839. William J. Keeney was perhaps the first person to take a bale of hay into the town of New York (now Florence) and that bale of hay was pressed on a press of his own invention and make and he loaded the first baled hay into a flat boat at Florence for the lower country market. It remained however for Samuel Hewitt to invent, make & put into successful operation the most useful hay press ever used in this or any other Country. Mr. Hewitt received a patent for his invention - which after Mr. Hewitt joined the Mormons received the appellation of the Mormon beater press - which in a few years superseded the old Screw press and all other hay presses, throughout this and the adjoining hay raising Counties in Southeastern Indiana. It is not necessary to say anything more in favor of the Mormon beater press for every hay raising farmer along the Ohio river and in fact over the whole great West has tested as usefulness and can best appreciate its work.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Sometime about the year 1829 or 1830 a young man who had studied medicine came to the County and located at Mount Sterling - and taught school, and at the same time pursued the Study of Medicine and in a few short years became one of the most extensive and successful practitioners in the county - in 1833 he was married to Miss Clarissa Golay daughter of Judge Elisha Golay he removed to Greensburgh about the year 18- where be acquired an extensive and lucrative practice - his wife died about the year 1850 leaving three sons. The widowed husband again married at Greensburgh and died about the year 1860. That young man lived to a tolerably advanced age, - That man was Doctor William Armington.

Some years after William Armington came to the county his Brother John L. Armington came to Mount Sterling, commenced teaching School, at the same time studying medicine. He commenced the practice of medicine sometime in 1837, was married to Eliza B. Lee a daughter of Mrs. Rachael Whitehead. He practiced medicine at Mount Sterling, and at Vevay for some years, when he removed to Greensburg and practiced medicine there for some time. Then went to Minisota where he is still living and engaged in his profession. His son Charles L. Armington is also a practiceing physician at Northfield Minnisota.

John L. Armingtons first wife died at Greensburgh and Charles L. Armington is the only living child by that marriage.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Charles Muret the father of Julius Muret, Mrs. Mary McCormick widow of John McCormick, John L. Muret (Deed) Benjamin Muret, was the only physician in the colony for many years before 1813. Although he was the only physician he had not much practice, for there was little sickness, and the citizens did not send for a physician for every little illness, cholic or such diseases as those of the present day are in the habit of doing. Doctor Muret went on a flat boat to New Orleans and there he became fireman in a steam mill to raise means to pay his passage to Europe - he sailed for Europe landed at Havre where he had an uncle who was a banker. After landing he made his way to the office of his uncle, having reached the office he enquired of a "domestique" if Mr. ---- his uncle was in the office. The "domestique" eyed the Doctor from head to foot asked in a haughty manner what he wanted the Doctor replied "I wish to see and speak to him" the "domestique" inquired what business he had with the Banker. The Doctors only reply was "I wish to see him. I must and will see him" and instantly forcing his way into the office although the domestique used every effort to prevent his entering - entering the private room of the Banker with his clothing and appearance not in the best condition he made himself known to his uncle who gave the Doctor an order on a clothier for a suit of clothes, after he was decently dressed with cane in hand he returned to his uncles office, where meeting the "domestique" he addressed him "You Scoundrel and puppy why did you insult me this morning" The "domestique" asked his pardon and appeared sorry. The doctor said to him in a haughty and angry tone "You Scoundrel and puppy I will learn you how to insult gentlemen hereafter. Do you know who you treated so shamefully this morning, I will let you know that I have been "fireman" in America" whereupon the "domestique" bowed, Scraped, and asked a thousand pardons, supposing that he had insulted an American officer of a high rank.

The Swiss Settlement of Switzerland County Indiana
by Perret Dufour
Published by the Indiana Historical Commission, Indianapolis 1925


Deb Murray