BENJAMIN GAGE was born in Union County, Ind., August 24, 1832, and is a son of Simeon and Ann T. (Davis) Gage, both natives of Indiana. Benjamin was reared upon a farm, received but meager education, and when aged seventeen began life for himself as a job farm hand. On October 27, 1858, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Updike, of Franklin County, born June 24, 1832, daughter of Morris B. Updike, a pioneer of Franklin, by which union they had seven children, three of whom are living - Margaret A., John F. and Mary F. After his marriage, Mr. Gage removed to Franklin County and began farming for himself, on rented land. On October 27, 1862, he enlisted for three years in Company H, Sixty-eighth Indiana Volunteers. In the first engagement, at Munfordsville, the regiment was captured, but they were soon paroled, and thereafter joined Gen. Thomas' command, being engaged at Stone River, Decatur, Chickamauga, Nashville and Missionary Ridge. While at Nashville, he was made Corporal, and at Strawberry Plains, Duty Sergeant. During his service, he never missed a roll-call, and was finally and honorably discharged, when he returned to Franklin County and resumed farming, and January, 1862, came to this county and rented land of Mr. J. B. Hibbs, on which he is farming extensively. He is an energetic man and a stanch Republican. Mrs. Gage is a member of the Baptist Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


W. P. GATES was born in Indianapolis November 17, 1838, and is a son Uriah and Martha (Chinn) Gates, the former a native of Ohio, and the latter of Kentucky. Uriah Gates removed to Indianapolis while it was a village, and was the first man married after the town was incorporated. He was a carpenter, and removed to this county in 1854, locating in Tipton, where he followed his trade as an expert until his death; he was an earnest Republican, and Scotch Presbyterian. W. P. Gates attended school and worked with his father at his trade and in the tannery. When twenty-one years old, he began for himself, and went to New York with a view of embarking to California, which he, however, abandoned and found work at Elizabethtown. He then returned home, and in 1855 located at Noblesville, in the tannery business; here he remained for two, years, when he sold out and located at New Lancaster. Afterward he worked as a journeyman until, in 1865, he purchased his present home of 163 acres, which he cleared and improved. In 1859, he was married to Miss L. Jackson, of this township, daughter of Carter T. Jackson, who died February 13, 1865, leaving four children - Iola M., Mary Leola, Carter T. and Louisa J. Mr. Gates was next married, June 6, 1867, to Miss Aurelia J. Kane, of this county, daughter of George Kane, a pioneer of this county; this union was productive of five children, four of whom survive - Ottoman Penn, Joseph R., John C. and Henrietta M. Since 1873, Mr. Gates has followed farming, and has worked eighty acres of good land; he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


ENOCH GOODWIN, father of Leander Goodwin, was born in North Bend, Ohio, May 30, 1807. He is of pure German descent. His grandfather on his mother's side, Judge Sims, bought of the General Government 10,000 acres, at 12-1/2 cents per acre, of the tract ceded by the Indians to the United States after their defeat by Anthony Wayne in 1795. This tract he leased for ninety-nine years. As Cincinnati now stands upon it, the descendants, including Gen. W. H. Harrison and Hon. Thomas A. Hendricks, are looking forward longingly to the time when it will fall into their hands. Mr. Goodwin's paternal grandfather and grandmother were Abraham and Elizabeth Hendricks. Enoch was reared on a farm in Lewis County, Ky., and had little opportunity to secure an education. In 1831, he settled in Rush County, Ind.; moved to Kansas in 1854, and returned in 1858. In 1862, he came to Madison Township. He was married to Melissa Staggs, daughter of James and Sarah (Beard) Staggs, of Fleming County, Ky., March 28, 1826. By her he had eight children, every other one of whom were deaf mutes. One of the mutes received a fine education, and was for a time a teacher in Baton Rouge, La. Mrs. Goodwin died September 15, 1816. Mr. Goodwin was next married, in 1843, to Lavina Sills, daughter of Joseph and Rebecca (Rairdon) Sills, of Rush County. Mr. Goodwin has been a Republican ever since the birth of that party. For several years he served as a Justice of the Peace in Rush County. He belongs to the Universalist Church, and his wife to the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


LEANDER GOODWIN, son of Enoch and Melissa (Staggs) Goodwin, was born in Rush County, Ind., October 21, 1842. He was reared on a farm, and attended school each winter. Upon hearing the call for three years' troops, he enlisted in Company D, Sixty-eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteers and participated in the battles at Munfordsville, Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga, Dandridge, Dalton, Nashville and several minor battles. Mr. Goodwin had seven bullet holes in his clothing, three of which acre made in the battle of Chicknmauga. He served as Corporal eighteen months, and was honorably discharged in 1865. Returning home, he removed to Curtisville, Tipton County, and clerked for R. T. Moon until 1875, when he started for himself, continuing until 1882. In August, 1881, he and J. B. Colvin purchased the Curtisville saw mill, and since have done a business of from $8,000 to $10,000 per annum. Leander owns a fine firm of 200 acres near Curtisville, 160 of which are well drained. He is a stanch Republican. He has served as Trustee of Madison Township, as express agent, as Deputy Postmaster, as Postmaster, and as Notary Public, and has done much to build up the financial interests of his community. Mr. Goodwin was married, August 12, 1868, to Miss Phoebe Adaline Marshall, daughter of Hazzard P. and Phoebe (Fisher) Marshall, of Tipton County. They have had five children - Celestia Daisy, Nora Selena, Sarah Rosalee, Norval U. G. and Cleva Idella.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


ESOM GROOVER, one of the pioneers of Madison Township, is a native of Rush County, Ind.; was born March 10, 1833, and is the son of William E. and Louvisa (Heflin) Groover, natives of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. The family came to this county in 1843, and settled on eighty acres of land, and underwent all the hardships of pioneer life. The elder Groover was a wagon-maker, and pursued his trade in connection with his farming; he was a prominent Democrat, and, with his wife, was a member of the Baptist Church; he died in 1870, at the age of seventy-four, having survived his wife, who died at the age of sixty-nine, about a year. Esom Groover assisted on the farm until twenty-four years of age, when he was married, November 22, 1857, to Nancy A. Harbit, daughter of James Harbit, and born in this township March 2, 1842. To this union have been born eight children - Elizabeth L., James W., Francis M., Lewis J., Christopher C., Effie M., Elmer and Evard. Mr. Groover resided on his parents' farm for seven years after his marriage, and then, in the fall of 1864, purchased a portion of his present farm, which he has increased to 172 acres, of which 100 are under cultivation, all cut out of the forest. Mr. Groover is a Democrat, and has always been a public-spirited man.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


J. M. GUSTIN was born in Madison County, Ind., June 4, 1841, and is one of the ten children of Jonathan and Christina (Eyer) Gustin, both natives of Ohio. Jonathan Gustin was a farmer, and, in 1832, emigrated to Madison County and located at Chesterfield, where he kept a hotel and grocery, but shortly afterward removed to a farm near Anderson, where he established a good home, and died in 1860; he was a member of the Christian Church, as was also his wife, who died in 1856. J. M. Gustin received common school education, and was reared a farmer. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company K, Seventeenth Indiana Volunteers, which regiment joined Gen. McClellan's command in West Virginia, and in the autumn was sent to the Army of the Cumberland. In February, 1863, the regiment was mounted and armed with the Spencer rifle. Shortly after the battle at Hoover's Gap, Mr. Gustin was detailed to the Eighteenth Battery, and after the engagements of Chattanooga and Chickamauga was returned to his regiment. On being discharged, June 20, 1864, he returned home and resumed farming. In March, 1865, he came to this township and worked for Iredell Wright, and on January 26, 1866, he was married to Miss Lucretia J. Darrow, of this county, born August 18, 1849, daughter of Zadock Darrow. Three children resulted from this union - Frank E., Albert L. and Jonathan R. In the spring of 1866, Mr. Gustin began working his home farm of 100 acres, of which he has cleared and improved eighty-five, having also built a brick dwelling at a cost of $2,900. In 1876, he visited Texas, where he purchased a farm, on which he raised a cotton and corn crop worth $600. This land, which cost him $960, he sold for $2,500, and, in 1877, returned to his old home.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


CHARLES E. HALL, merchant, son of William L. and Mary E. (Ruff) Hall, was born in Rush County, Ind., March 15, 1859, near Glenwood. His mother is a native born German, and his father a son of Kentucky. William L. lived on a farm in Kentucky until 1854, when he removed to Rush County. After twelve years' farming there, he removed to Hamilton County, remaining three years before a final removal to Madison Township, Tipton County. By hard work, he has made one of the best 100-acre grain farms in the township, upon which are commodious buildings. He was married to Mary L. Ruff, daughter of Catherine Ruff, of Pendleton County, Ky., October 6, 1854. From this union there have been seven children - Samuel J. A., Charles E., Mary C., Francis L., Mary E., James S. and Mary L. Charles E. Hall, the subject of this sketch, was reared a farmer. He had little opportunity for education, and early shifted for himself. At the age of nineteen he bought a forty-acre farm from the savings of two years, or $1,045. This he sold in 1881, and began clerking for Lee Goodwin. Very soon he bought out Goodwin, and is now doing a successful merchandise business. He carries a nice general stock, which is insured at $1,500, and has a trade of $8,000. His store is a very popular one. Mr. Hall has been Deputy Postmaster, and also railroad and express agent. His politics are Democratic.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


HENRY Z. HARBIT was born in Tipton County February 21, 1842, and is the eldest of eleven children of Isaac and Wincy (Brown) Harbit, ten of whom are living. The parents of Henry came to this county about 1837, and were married in 1841. Henry's maternal great-grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier for more than six years, his parents having been killed by Indians before he enlisted. Henry Z. Harbit was reared upon a frontier farm by one of the first families of this township, and received a primitive pioneer school education. When but a small boy, he assisted in clearing the forest, and continued at like duties until his majority, when he began life for himself, first as a farm hand and afterward upon rented land until 1865, in the fall of which year he removed with his family to Marion County, locating eight miles from Indianapolis. He afterward moved westward with his father to Monroe County, Mo., where he farmed for four years, when he returned to this county, in the year 1872, and located two miles south of New Lancaster, since which time he has made numerous changes, having purchased, in 1879, his present home. Mr. Harbit was married, June 6, 1564, to Miss Millie Townsend, of Madison County, born February 4, 1841, daughter of Isaac Townsend, one of the pioneers of Hamilton County. To this union was born one son - James Willard. Mr. Harbit has been a hard worker and liberal citizen. He is a stanch Democrat, and has served as Township Assessor and Constable.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


FRANCIS M. HARBIT was born in Hamilton County, Ind., August 24, 1843, and is the second son of Isaac and Wincy (Brown) Harbit, the former a native of Kentucky, the latter of North Carolina. The grandparents of Francis settled in this county about 1837. Isaac Harbit removed with his parents from Rush County to Tipton County, Ind., in the fall of 1837, and located near New Lancaster; he was obliged to have a guide to find his father's land, which had been purchased unseen. Here he began life in a cabin with puncheon floor; he endured many privations in his forest home among Indians, and killed seven deer in one half day. The family lived upon game and potatoes, made their own clothing, and in 1862 owned 160 acres of good land, which Mr. Harbit sold, and removed to Monroe County, Mo., where he purchased 350 acres, on which he lived, and died June 10, 1879; his widow still resides on said farm, aged sixty-four years. Francis M. Harbit was reared on the paternal farm, acquiring but a limited education. When twenty-one years old, he commenced for himself by working on an elevator; afterward he farmed on rented land for two years; then sold goods at Jackson Station for one year, when he resumed farming for three years, and purchased 100 acres near New Lancaster; this farm he exchanged for one entered by one Benjamin Leavell, where he has since made his home. Mr. Harbit has now 198 acres in this township, well improved and cultivated; during his life he has owned eight different farms. On March 16, 1866, he married Miss Elizabeth Juday, born October 10, 1844, daughter of Samuel and Nancy (Boss) Juday, by whom he had eight children, five of whom survive - Effie M., Marquis S., John V., Charlie and Henry A. Mr. Harbit is an Odd Fellow, a member of the County Agricultural Society, of the Board of Directors, and a good citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


WILLIAM P. HARMAN was born in Chatham County, N. C., February 27, 1807, and is the second son of George and Amelia (Polk) Harman, both natives of Virginia. The maternal grandfather of William was a Captain in the Revolutionary war, and his father a soldier of 1812. George Harman removed to North Carolina in 1805, and followed carriage-making; he lived to be seventy years old, and was, as also his wife, a leading worker in the Baptist Church. William P. Harman received but spare education, and worked upon the farm until his majority. In 1829, he removed to New Castle, Ind., and obtained employment at cutting wood and splitting rails; he also worked at carpentering for 50 cents per day, and was boarded for 50 cents per week. He afterward opened a cabinet shop, which he continued until 1834, and on April 24 of that year was married to Miss Mary B. Leeson, daughter of Richard L. and Jane (Dewly) Leeson. To this union were born sixteen children, only four of whom are living - Moses D., William H., Edmund F. and T. Lincoln. Soon after his marriage, he engaged in farming in Wayne County, at which he continued fourteen years. In the spring of 1848, he came to this county and purchased 160 acres of his present home, on which he located in August. Game was abundant, but Mr. Harman preferred clearing his land to hunting. For many years they made their own clothing, and endured the common privations of the time. He has now 194 acres as a home, the result of labor and economy. His son, John A. Harman, was a soldier of Company E, Thirty-fourth Indiana Volunteers, and served until the war closed, and after passing through many battles unscathed, was drowned from a small boat during a storm.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


BENJAMIN F. HINDS was born in Franklin County, Ind., February 14, 1842, and is a son of Abraham and Margaret (Hetrick) Hinds, the former a native of New Jersey, the latter of Pennsylvania. The parents of Benjamin came West in early life, where they married and reared nine children, six of whom are living. Mr. Hinds was a cooper, and later a farmer. Mrs. Hinds still lives on the farm located by her father fifty-six years ago, aged sixty years. Benjamin passed his boyhood on the farm with his father, and on September 18, 1861, enlisted in Company G, Thirty -seventh Indiana Volunteers, which was assigned to the Fourteenth corps, under Gen. Thomas. This regiment was engaged at Stone River, and in all the battles of the Atlanta campaign. After serving his term, during which he never asked for or received a furlough, Mr. Hinds was honorably discharged at Indianapolis, October 27, 1864, since which time he has suffered greatly from rheumatism. After his return, he attended Peoria Academy two years, working at farming by times, and in 1866 entered Brookville College, whence, after nine months, he graduated with honors in the scientific course. The following winter he taught school, and in February, 1868, came to New Lancaster and engaged with his brother James (now deceased) in the mercantile line; this he continued three years, after which he commenced farming, and in 18'75 purchased his present home of eighty acres. In 1876, he engaged with George Myerly, in the manufacture of drain tile. After Mr. Myerly's death, in January, 1582, he continued the business extensively, substituting steam for horse-power. On July 30, 1870, Mr. Hinds was married, to Miss Charlotte Myerly, of this township, born May 1, 1854, and daughter of George and Susanna (Claubaugh) Myerly. Six children have blessed this union - George H., Alonzo F., Mary C., Mellie O., Nettie B. and Anna B. C. Mr. Hinds is a Republican, an upright man and a good citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


JACOB B. HOBBS was born in Lee County, Va., October 18, 1829, and is a son of Absalom and Mary (Olinger) Hobbs, the former a native of Virginia, the latter of Germany. J. B. Hobbs obtained but little education, having to assist his father on the farm, that parent dying when Jacob was eleven years old. When he was fifteen, he emigrated to Ohio and worked as a farm hand in Scioto County. In April, 1851, he and a brother removed to Missouri, having February 29 of the previous year rnarried Miss Lucinda Seward, of' Lee County, Va., born in Kentucky, June 6, 1832, daughter of Nathan Seward. Mrs. Hobbs died May 20, 1883, leaving seven children - Andrew J., Nancy C., Robert D., Absalom; Catherine, Cassius M. and Henry S. Mr. Hobbs and brother were not charmed with Missouri, and they embarked for this county, where they arrived June 3, 1851, cleared ground, erected a cabin and began work. Mr. Hobbs now began to deal in cattle, was successful and soon purchased fifty acres of land for $500, on which he paid $200. He has been one of the largest stock dealers in the county; he now has 634 acres in this township, besides property in Tipton, all due to his great industry, having at one time labored for 876 cents per day. In April, 1882, he removed to his present residence. He is an active Republican; has been Justice of the Peace two terms, without one reverse of judgment by the Superior Courts; was enrollment officer during the war; was Ditch Commissioner, and is Notary Public and Deputy Assessor; he is also a Freemason. Mr. Hobbs drove the first cattle marketed from this county, and is now the heaviest tax-payer in his township.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


JOHN HOBBS was born in this township October 24, 1843, and is the seventh of the ten children of Absalom and Mary (Jones) Hobbs, both natives of Virginia. Absalom Hobbs emigrated to this State in 1837, and located near Indianapolis, and in the winter of that year came to this county and entered eighty acres, on which he erected a cabin and in which he moved in the spring of 1838. He made the shoes for the family, his wife spinning and weaving the flax and wool for their clothing. He was a successful farmer and an expert coon-hunter, by which he obtained sufficient to pay for his groceries and taxes. He gave to each of his children eighty acres or its equivalent, and died, September 27, 1880, aged seventy-one years; his wife preceded him in 1878; they mere prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. John Hobbs assisted on the farm until his eighteenth year, when, in August, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Thirty-ninth Indiana Volunteers. The regiment was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland, and at the battle of Stone River Mr. Hobbs was taken prisoner and was sent to Libby Prison, at Richmond, being afterward paroled and later exchanged, June 1, 1863, when he returned to his regiment at Murfreesboro, Tenn., and afterward, at the battle of Chickamauga, was wounded in the leg by a shell, which necessitated amputation of that member. He was captured after being wounded, but soon afterward exchanged and removed to Nashville; he was discharged, June 22, 1864, after which he attended school two years. On December 11, 1867, he married Miss Nancy E. Leavell, of this township, born October 15, 1848, daughter of Benjamin Leavell. To this union were born six children - Orlen O., Nettie V., Mary M., Benjamin A., Perry M. and Frederick. In 1868, he engaged in farming in this township, where he continued until 1879, when he located on his present site, the land having been entered by his wife's father. Mr. Hobbs now has 107 acres, well improved; he is a Republican in politics.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


JOHN M. HOBBS was born in Marion County, Ind., May 26, 1831, and is the eldest son of Henry H. and Rebecca (Ballard) Hobbs, both natives of Virginia. The paternal great-grandfather of John fought under King George III. Henry H. Hobbs, when young, emigrated to Highland County, Ohio, where he was married, and afterward removed to Marion County, Ind., which county he assisted to organize, and built the first house in Indianapolis. In 1836, he came to this county, where he entered 480 acres, 200 of which he cleared. He erected and occupied a cabin, from between the logs of which, on the first morning of occupancy, he shot a deer. He was a man of endurance, an expert hunter and respected citizen. He was a member of the U. B. Church, as is his wife, who lives on the home farm. Mr. Hobbs died March 6, 1852; he was twice married. John M. Hobbs assisted his father until his twenty-first year, when he began to work for himself, and saved enough from his wages of 50 and 70 cents a, day to purchase his first eighty acres, a portion of his present home. On August 18, 1854, he married Miss Mary A. Green, of this county, born in Maryland in 1835. Five children have blessed their union, four of whom are living - Columbus G., Celina C., Sarah J. and Samuel T. Soon after his marriage, he occupied a log cabin in the forest, fourteen miles from a road and surrounded by savages, since which time he has cleared from the forest 130 acres, having in all 160, with large frame house and barn. In February, 1865, he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Fifty-third Regiment, for the term of war, serving seven months; he was discharged August, 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Hobbs are members of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


WARDEN C. HOBBS was born May 16, 1839, on the farm on which he now resides, and which was settled by his father in 1836. He is the eldest of the six children of Henry H. and Maria (Peerson) Hobbs, the former a native of Virginia, the latter of Ohio. Mr. Hobbs was reared on the farm of his father, who died when the former was thirteen. In 1861, he built the house in which he now lives, and on March 10 of that year was married to Miss Sarah E. Beeson, of this township, born November 7, 1839, daughter of dames and Sarah (Little) Beeson. Eight children blessed this union - Vincent R., William S., Malury, Liblian, Julia, Molsey, Othamile and Edwood. In July, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and First Indiana Volunteers, assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. He was in the battles of Perryville and Milton, Tenn., after which he was taken sick, sent to the hospital, and finally transferred to the Invalid Corps, in which he had large experience as nurse and "dresser." He was discharged August 26, 1865, when he returned to his home and farming. He has now 176 acres, 130 of which are under cultivation, well improved and with good under-drainage. Mr. Hobbs is a Republican and a progressive citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


GRANVILLE H. HOBBS was born in Lee County, Va., May 16, 1831, and is a son of Job and Susan (Flanery) Hobbs, both natives of Virginia. Job Hobbs was a farmer and stock-raiser, a prominent horseman, a Democrat and a leading member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He died at the age of eighty years. G. H. Hobbs was reared as a farmer, and remained at home until he attained his majority, receiving his education from the subscription schools. He began life with his brother in the mercantile line at Owsley County, Ky. After two years, Mr. Hobbs purchased 400 acres and commenced as a farmer and stock-raiser. In 1863, owing to the strength and growth of Southern sentiment, he deemed it expedient to move North, and arrived in this county March 1 of the following year, when he rented a farm in Madison Township, and afterward purchased forty acres in Hamilton County, where he resided for a time. In March, 1865, he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Indiana Volunteers, and was discharged in August following. On returning home, he resumed farming and added forty acres to his land. In 1867, he purchased his present home, which he has largely improved by good buildings and the like, constituting as good a farm as the township contains, of 285 acres, of which 150 acres are cultivated. He was married, February 4, 1857, to Jane Myers, of Lee County, Va., born March 3, 1839, daughter of John and Rachel Myers. His union was fruitful in eleven children, nine of whom survive - Lucetta J., Rachel A., Varthula, William S., John S., Sarah E., Ida, Janetta and Maud E.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


M. M. HOBBS was born in this county December 14, 1845, and is one of the ten children of Levi and Cvnthia (Boles) Hobbs, natives of Virginia and Ohio respectively. Levi Hobbs emigrated to Marion County, Ind., in early manhood, where he married. In 1841, he removed to this county, and located in Madison Township on twenty-eight acres of forest land, which he increased to seventy, and of which he made a home. During the winter seasons he taught school successfully. He was a Democrat and served as Justice of the Peace; he died April, 1863, aged fifty-four years. Mrs. Hobbs is still living, aged sixty-seven years. M. M. Hobbs acquired the usual education of farmers' boys, and grew to manhood at home. In 1868, he went West on a tour of prospecting, but soon returned and attended school, after which he taught for some time. In 1878, he commenced mercantile business at Hobbs, in which he has been successful. In 1879, he was appointed railroad agent, and Assistant Postmaster, and in April, 1881, was commissioned Postmaster, which he still holds. In addition to his grain farm, he is interested in a tile factory. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, also a Republican. In 1874, Mr. Hobbs was married to Miss Sarah J. Lilly, born March 7, 1856, daughter of Green Lilly, of this township.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


JOHN R. HOUSE was born in Morgan County, Ind., November 9, 1841, and is the eldest of eleven children, nine of whom are living, of George and Lucy (King) House, the former a native of Pennsylvania, the latter of Ohio. George House was an early settler of Morgan County. In 1842, he removed to Hamilton County, and located on land entered by Mrs. House's parents, where he made many improvements; he owned at his death 640 acres, besides having given 520 to his children. He was a man of great industry and endurance, a Freemason, a stanch Republican, a Patron of Husbandry and a prominent churchman; he died September 22, 1877, aged fifty-seven, followed by his wife in February, 1879, aged fifty-four years. John R. was reared a farmer and received but a limited education. When twenty-one years of age he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and First Indians Volunteers, which was incorporated into Gen. Buell's command, later into the Army of the Cumberland, and finally transferred to the Nineteenth Indiana Battery. The regiment participated in the struggles of Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga and Chattanooga. At the last-named point he was wounded in the left arm, but remained on duty. At Mission Ridge he was made a gunner of the Eighteenth Battery; he was in the Army of Gen. Sherman at Atlanta and in the historic march to the sea, during which he was "under fire " ninety successive days, and was much disabled by sickness; he was discharged July 1, 1865, after three years' faithful and honorable service. He returned to Hamilton County, on November 16 of which year he was married to Sarah Leman, by whom he has six children, four living - William V., Almeda G., Albert M. and Lucy C. After marriage he moved to his present farm of 240 acres. Mr. H. is a stanch Republican.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


CARTER T. JACKSON, was born in Bourbon County, Ky., March 7, 1807, and is the second son of James and Martha (Chambers) Jackson, both natives of North Carolina. Carter came with his parents to Wayne County, Ind., when five years of age, where his father entered land and began farming; he also tanned his own leather, and made shoes for the family, his wife spinning the flax and wool, from which his clothes were made. He was an active Democrat, and he and wife were prominent Baptists. Carter grew up a pioneer farmer, and received a fair education at the peculiar schools of that day. When twenty-one years of age, he began teaching for his neighbors; he also worked on the farm until 1838, when he located in this county, and entered 240 acres at $1.25 per acre, where he erected a cabin and resided therein while unfinished. His trading was done and grain ground at Milton and Perkinsville; his wheat was hauled to Lawrenceburg - 120 miles - for 62-1/2 cents per bushel. Mr. Jackson resided in the county five years previous to its organization, and was inspector of the first election, there being but nineteen votes cast, these he carried to Noblesville on horseback. He gave his first vote for Gen. Jackson in 1832, and has since voted with the Democrats. In 1845, he was elected to the Legislature from Tipton and Hamilton Counties, and has since been very popular. Mr. Jackson was married, June 7, 1836, to Miss Malinda Leavell, of Wayne County, Ind., born November 18, 1815. By this union they had nine children - Monroe, Louisa (deceased), Lafayette, F. Marion, Thomas J., Sarah M., Andrew, Terence M. and Serepta L. Mrs. Jackson died March 2, 1873, aged fifty-eight years. Mr. Jackson has a very extensive orchard, which he himself planted from seed gathered in Wayne County.

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"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


MARGARET (BAKER) JAHRLING is the widow of Jacob Jahrling (once a leading farmer of this township), who came hither from Shelby County, Ind., September, 1858, and located upon land having small improvements, and purchased 150 acres. Mr. Jahrling was a native of Hesse-Darrnstadt, Germany, born April 4, 1820. In 1830, his parents emigrated to America, and located for two years in Fredericktown, Penn., thence removing to Shelby County, Ind., where he assisted his father to make it home. On February 17, 1842, he married Miss Margaret Baker, a native of Bavaria, Germany, born June 13, 1819, daughter of Michael and Margaret (Chattle) Baker, who emigrated to America and entered 160 acres in Shelby County, Ind. Mrs. Jahrling and her husband began life poor, living the first year mainly on corn bread. They soon, however, improved their circumstances, while farming on rented land for ten years, and afterward purchased 120 acres. In all of this period Mrs. Jahrling assisted her husband in the field. On removing to this county, after selling their farm, they labored industriously, having 100 acres under cultivation here, with good buildings and a large variety of fruit, it being now one of the best farms in the township. Mr. Jahrling died September 21, 1880, aged sixty years, and is buried on Little Duck Creek, on land cleared by himself. He was the father of eleven children, eight of whom survive - Margaret, Mary, Henry, Catherine, Jacob, John, Peter and Elizabeth. The three youngest are at home with their mother. Mr. Jahrling was an active Democrat, and a member of the Lutheran Church. Mrs. Jahrling is a member of the United Presbyterian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


J. T. JESSUP, M. D., Curtisville, whose portrait appears in this work, is the eldest son of a family of thirteen children born to Ellis W. and Melicent (Hinshaw) Jessup. He is of English descent, and was born in Hamilton County, Ind., January 27, 1849. His father is also a native of Indiana, born in Wayne County November 15, 1824. He was a son of Abraham and Hannah Jessup, and was reared on his father's farm, near Richmond, until he was eight years old when his parents moved to Hamilton County. Here he remained working on the farm and obtaining such education as the schools of that time afforded, continuing farming in Hamilton County until 1868, when he removed to Marion, and thence to Hendricks County, where he now lives, near Plainfield. He was reared to heed the doctrines of the Friends' Church, but since his marriage with Miss Melicent Hinshaw, which occurred June 11, 1846, he has been a member of the Christian Church. He is an active Republican and an enterprising citizen of Hendricks County. J. T. Jessup, the subject of this sketch, was reared on the home farm, attending the public schools until the age of thirteen, when he was sent to the Poplar Ridge Seminary, where he continued attending until he was seventeen; then he attended the Zionsville Academy one year. With this excellent academic education, he began teaching. After having taught one year, his health failed, and he spent the summer in Northern Minnesota, whence he returned in good health, and for a number of years continued teaching in Hamilton and Marion Counties, and while thus engaged began the study of medicine. Subsequently entering the Indiana Medical College, located at Indianapolis, he graduated in 1873. He then traveled extensively through the Western States, visiting the various mines and other objects of interest in Utah, Nevada and California. After returning, he spent one minter in the South and Southwest, remaining a portion of the time in New Orleans, then visiting the Western States, and remaining at Philadelphia during the Centennial, when he returned and located at Curtisville in the autumn of 1876, where he has since been in practice, and has established a successful and lucrative business. Dr. Jessup has been a life-long Republican and is foremost in all progressive measures of education and enterprise. He was married, July 1, 1877, to Miss Bessie Lee, a daughter of John and Kate Lee, of Curtisville. They have two children - Gerna and Glenna.

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"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


DAVID JUDAY was born in Preble County, Ohio. March 11, 1832, and is the only living son of Samuel and Catherine (Michael) Juday, the former a native of Virginia, and the latter of Ohio. Samuel Juday came early to Ohio, where he married Catherine Michael, who died, when he married Nancy Ross. By diligence, he acquired a comfortable home out of the wooded land, and was an active participator in organizing his county and township. David Juday came to this township when nine years old, where he assisted his father, and acquired some education from the schools of that time, to which he added by application after his periods of work. On reaching manhood, he received eighty acres from his father, now a part of his present home. On November 23, l856, he was married to Miss Mary Houser, of this county, born in Preble County, Ohio, May 6, 1838, and came hither with her parents, Isaac and Susanna (Catherman) Houser; this union was blessed with thirteen children, of whom eight are living - John H., Lewis F., Irvin E., Ora A., Lucinda C., Amos O., C. Alice and Sarah B. After his marriage he returned to his forest home, where he has since resided; to this land he has added, by clearing, sixty acres, making now 380 acres. Mr. Juday came here when the county was an unbroken forest. He is an industrious man and useful citizen, a liberal Democrat, and a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a charter member of the Grange.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


HENRY A. JUDAY was born in this township April 30, 1850, and is the youngest of the ten children of Samuel and Nancy (Ross) Juday, the former a native of Virginia, and the latter of Ohio. In January, 1841, the family removed from Preble County, Ohio, to this township, and located on land exchanged for property in Ohio. Samuel Juday had at this time 284 acres of forest land; this he partly cleared, and erected a log cabin, afterward substituting better buildings; he was a Democrat, and died September 13, 1880, his wife preceding him in February, 1878. Henry A. received but a limited education, having to assist his father at home. On October 16, 1870, he married Miss Mary E. Vanness, of this county, born in Butler County, Ohio, September 25, 1852, daughter of Daniel Vanness; to this union were born six children - Anna, Nellie, Samuel D., Frances A., Ollie M. and Vessie Viola. After marriage, Mr. Juday located on the home farm, in the second house built by his father, and four years later removed to his present home adjoining, which embraces 140 acres, well drained and improved. Mr. Juday is a Democrat, an upright man and enterprising citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


GREEN LILLY was born in West Virginia April 11, 1814, and is a son of David and Sarah (Wilson) Lilly, both natives of Virginia. Green spent his boyhood with his parents, in Henry County, Ind., where his father won from the forest a home, and where Green obtained his education, and taught one term of school before his majority, in the most primitive of cabins. Afterward he worked at farming and purchased an interest in a saw mill. In 1844, having purchased three forty-acre lots, and afterward obtained forty acres more, he sold the same and purchased 120 in Cicero Township. On December 14, 1848, he was married to Miss Sarah E. Wright, of this township, born March 4, 1825, daughter of Joseph and Sarah J. (Salter) Wright. Eight children blessed this union - Joseph A,, David, Sylvan E.. Sarah J., Mary H., James G. (deceased), Edwin W. and Oliver G. Mr. Lilly sold his land in 1849, and in April, 1850, purchased eighty acres of his present home, to which he added eighty more and greatly improved, 120 of which are under cultivation. He is a large stock-raiser, and devotes the greater part of his land to pasture. Although not a politician, he has been Justice of the Peace and Township Trustee, as well as County Commissioner one term. He prepared some of the first square timber and built some of the first cabins erected in Tipton. Mr. Lilly is a progressive and valued citizen, and Mrs. Lilly is a useful member of the M. E. Church.

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"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


SAMUEL MORRIS was born in Ross County, Ohio, May 16, 1832, and is a son of John and Sarah (Wykoff) Morris, the former a native of Indiana, the latter of Ohio. John Morris was a farmer, who removed from Ohio to Hamilton County, Ind., in 1835, and located near Strawtown, where he entered land and built a cabin. After some years, he removed to Arcadia, where he died May 3, 1879, aged eighty-three; his widow is still living, aged seventy-eight years; he was and she is a member of the Dunkard Church. Samuel Morris was reared in Hamilton County, where he attended the schools of the day. When nineteen years old, he began working for himself as a farm hand. He was married, March 11, 1854, to Miss Elizabeth Welshous, of Hamilton County, who died March, 1856, leaving one daughter, Adaline. Mr. Morris was next married, May 10, 1857, to Miss Martha Likens, of Madison County, born September 15, 1831. Eight children blessed this union, of whom six are living - Sarepta J., Malinda A., John F., Celia A., Sarah M. and Susanna R. In 1858, Mr. Morris located where he yet resides, and lived in a poor cabin, which has now given way to a handsome frame dwelling, at a cost of $2,000; he now owns 160 acres, ninety of which are well cultivated and underdrained. February 13, 1865, he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Fifty-third Indiana Volunteers; he was mostly on guard duty until discharged, September 7, 1865, when he resumed farming. He is a stanch Republican.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


GEORGE W. MYERLY was born in Maryland June 2, 1835, and is the eldest son of George and Susan (Clabaugh) Myerly, both natives of Maryland. George Myerly was a farmer, and in 1837 moved to Wayne County, Ind., whence he removed, in the fall of 1842, to this county and entered eighty acres one-half mile east of New Lancaster, on which he erected a rude cabin. Here he experienced many hardships, but being a man of strong endurance and will, he overcame them by degrees and became independent. He took part in organizing his county and township; was a Democrat and held several offices. He died January 15, 1882, aged seventy years; his wife is living on the home farm, aged sixty-nine years. George W. Myerly assisted his father on the farm and attended school until his twenty-second year. On April 9,1857, he was married to Miss Lucinda Ray, of Madison County, born August 18, 1837, daughter of Hugh Ray. To this union followed four children, three of whom are living - Frances M., Mary E. and J. Elmer. Shortly after marriage, Mr. Myerly removed to the farm, which he now occupies. Here, by industry, economy and the struggle with privation, he was enabled, in December, 1867, to make a payment on said farm of 160 acres, which was paid for five years thereafter, and which he has since greatly improved, including the building of a bank-barn costing $1,000, the best in the county. Mr. Myerly is a Democrat and has been elected County Commissioner and to other minor offices.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


JAMES NELSON was born in Fayette County, Ind., January 14, 1814, and is the fourth of the eight children of Andrew and Elizabeth (Jones) Nelson, both natives of South Carolina. Andrew Nelson emigrated to what was afterward Fayette County in 1813, where he experienced much privation, and in 1821, after the death of his wife, removed to Union County and engaged in farm labor. About 1850, he located in this township, where he cleared a farm, and closed his life December 14, 1855. He was a Jacksonian Democrat and an upright citizen. James Nelson was reared on the paternal farm and acquired a fair education. When eight years old, he was bound to a farmer, with whom he remained ten years, then beginning farm labor in Union County. He soon returned to Fayette County and engaged in farming. There, May 13, 1834, he was married to Aurilla J. Palmer, of New York, who died August 13, 1851, leaving four children - Aurilla J., Martha E., John W. and Miranda. On November 19, 1857, Mr. Nelson was married to Mrs. Mary E. (Watkins) Trenberger, of Tipton County, by whom he had five children - Laura S., Louisa A., Emma V., Mary E. (deceased) and Loretta J. In 1847, Mr. Nelson removed, by ox-team, to Wisconsin, where his first wife died. On January 10, 1853, he returned to this township and engaged in farming until the fall of 1865, and in the following spring removed to New Lancaster and engaged in the grocery trade, to which he added, later, dry goods, notions, boots and shoes. He now has a good stock of goods and owns some village property. Mr. Nelson gave his first vote for Gen. Harrison, in 1836; he is now a Republican, and was commissioned Postmaster of New Lancaster, in 1870.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


JAMES NELSON is the seventh in a family of eight children born to John and Mary (Mabbet) Nelson; he was born in Wayne County, Ind., October 7, 1834, and was reared by Larken Garr, his father having died in 1836; his mother, a daughter of Anthony Mabbet, died in 1871. At the age of twenty he moved to Madison County, and for nine years worked in a, saw-mill, earning enough in the meantime to buy a half interest. He next bought a tract of land on Duck Creek, Madison County, which land, five years later, he traded for the sixty acres he now owns in this township - then all in a wild state, but now highly improved and increased to 120 acres. January 4, 1857, he married Louisa, daughter of John and Catherine (Farren) Brown, and to this union have been born seven children, named as follows: John W., James V., Franklin, Jesse, Ora Josephine, Della and Charles. Of these, three are dead. Mr. Nelson has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for about twelve years, and in politics votes with the Democratic party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


DR. GRANVILLE NEWBY was born in Somerset, Ky., April 6, 1821, and is the third of the eight children of Edrnund and Mary (Tumbleson) Newby, the former a native of Virginia, the latter of Kentucky. When Dr. Newby was seven years old, his parents removed to Indianapolis, where he assisted his father upon the farm until his majority, having obtained a limited education from the common schools, when he began the study of medicine in the office of Drs. Ruddle & Maranda, of Allisonville, he studied five years, and afterward located at Cicerotown, Hamilton County, where he commenced practice in the spring of 1847, and in October following removed to New Lancaster, being the first physician in this township; he began practice here in a primitive cabin purchased from Abraham Russel, and successfully endured the hardships of a general practice in a frontier country. On February 14, 1847, he married Miss Abigail Barnhill, of Indianapolis, born April 5, 1830, daughter of Robert and Jane Barnhill; to this union were born ten children, three of whom are living - Mary E., Presley and Frank. Dr. Newby can recall many circumstances of early life, and has a pioneer table of hewed white ash, five feet long and thirty-eight inches wide; he recalls the first mill to which he was sent, in which the grain was cracked - the finer being used as meal, the other as hominy - in a dugout tree, the beater being an iron wedge. Dr. Newby is an enterprising man and leading citizen. Mrs. Newby is a member of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


HUGH RAY (deceased) was born in North Carolina; he removed when young to Tennessee, where he married Sarah C. Reder, a native of that State. A few years afterward he emigrated on foot, to Rush County, Ind., first stopping at White Water, and thence going westward to Madison County, where he commenced pioneer life with limited means, struggling from year to year for a livelihood, corn bread being his main food; later, however, by industry and saving, he succeeded in obtaining eighty acres of land. During this time the family clothing was made from the flax raised by them, they experiencing many of the hardships common to early settlers, but game was abundant, as were also the Indians. Mr. Ray was a man of much endurance, and always secured his share of game. Once, while attending a log rolling, he received an injury which rendered him a life-time cripple; he died in December, 1845, and his wife about 1860; they had eleven children born to them, of whom seven are living ; both were members of church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


EDWARD J. SHARP was born in Highland County, Ohio, September 27, 1811, and is one of the ten children of Andrew and Elizabeth (Watts) Sharp, both natives of South Carolina. Andrew Sharp emigrated to Highland County about 1808, where he farmed until 1827, when he removed to Marion County, Ind., locating nine miles west of Indianapolis; he then removed to Hamilton County, and thence to this county in 1838, where he entered 160 acres and made improvements. He had various struggles, the family making their own clothing for many years, and as he was about establishing a good home he died in 1858, his wife having gone before, in 1856, he being eighty-one and she seventy-one years of age. Mr. Sharp was a soldier of 1812, and participated in the organization of the county and township; both he and wife were Presbyterians. Edward J. Sharp was sixteen years old when his parents removed to Marion County, where he received a rudimentary education and assisted his father. In 1833, he made a trip to La Porte and Michigan City in search of a location, but soon returned to Marion County. In 1840, he came to this county on foot, and had walked from Marion County to Highland County, Ohio, in four days-200 miles. On January 1, 1840, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Leaman, born July 3, 1811, near Bardstown, Ky., daughter of Robert and Mary (Richy) Leaman. To this union were born six children, four of whom are living - Amanda, Lydia, Mahala and Sophia. In 1859, he purchased the homestead, on which he has since resided. He acquired, in all, 280 acres, but has given to his children 180. Mr. Sharp was a soldier in the Black Hawk war, and had two sons in the late war, one of whom perished from wounds received in the service, the other from exposure therein.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


JAMES SHAW (deceased) was born in Butler County, Ohio, Septernber 16, 1797, and was the son of Knowles and Sophia (Ogg) Shaw, of Maryland. James was taught farming in connection with the trade of a tanner, and in 1822 moved to this State, and located on Flat Rock, in Rush County, where he entered eighty acres, and built and occupied a cabin without window, fire-place or floor. After residing here a few years, he removed to Vermillion County, and after two years returned to Rush County and entered 120 acres. This he sold in 1836 for $1,100, when he came to this county and entered the land on which his widow now lives. Previous to coming West, on March 22, 1821, he married Miss Sarah Little, born in Susquehanna County, N. Y., in 1804, daughter of John and Lydia (Hendrickson) Little, the former a native of New York, the latter of England. Ten children succeeded this union, of whom six survive - John, Albin, George L., Lydia, Malinda and Martha J. Mr. Shaw and family endured many privations, and for years they made their clothing from home-grown flax. Mr. Shaw at one time owned 670 acres, which he lived to see partially improved. He was a prominent man among his neighbors; he was a Democrat, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a useful citizen; he died May 21, 1829. Mrs. Shaw is a member of the United Brethren Church, and is now seventy-nine years old.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


ALBIN SHAW was born in Rush County, Ind., December 6, 1825, and is the fourth son of James Shaw, a pioneer of this township. Albin was reared a farmer, with fair education, coming to this county when but nine years of age, and assisted his father until of age. In 1851, he was married to Sarah Shaw, of this county, daughter of Isaac Shaw, who died in 1856, leaving three children, two of whom survive - Marion and Catharine. After his marriage, Albin located upon eighty acres of forest land, given him by his father, on which he built a cabin, and where he established a fine home; he was a fond hunter of the game of that day; he has assisted in cutting most of the roads of the southeast part of this township, and has been Road Supervisor for ten years.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


JOHN SHAW, SR., was born April 15, 1824; came to Tipton County in 1837, and assisted his father on the farm, which his mother, Sarah Shaw, now occupies, and where he passed his boyhood and received a fair education. When twenty-one years old, he began working at jobs, thus earning his first horse. In the spring of 1846, he set about clearing the land on which he now resides, and on July 9 of that year was married to Miss Sarah Willborn, of Madison County, born in North Carolina March 8, 1825, daughter of William and Ruth (Hayworth) Willborn. Seven children followed this union, six of whom are living - Mary, William B., James O., Sylvester T., Thomas J. and George B. Mr. Shaw now erected and moved into a log cabin with plank floor, where he resided for many years, which has since given way to fine buildings and improvements. He is a large and enthusiastic stock-raiser, especially of horses; is a member of the Masonic brotherhood, an active Democrat, having been Real Estate Appraiser, Township Assessor and Constable. He was a lover of hunting, killing his last deer in 1868, and for years a trapper and dealer in furs. Mrs. Shaw is a member of the New-Light Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


JACOB T. WHISLER was born in Wayne County, Ind., October 16, 1835, and is the eldest son of Rev. John and Elizabeth (Thomas) Whisler, the former a native of Pennsylvania, the latter of Kentucky. Rev. John Whisler was reared a farmer, and emigrated to Wayne County, where he married, and farmed on rented land until 1846, when he removed to this county, where he located on land entered by him in 1836; here he succeeded in making a good home. In 1883, he removed to Kansas, where he engaged in farming and stock-raising. He is an ordained minister of the Christian Church. Jacob T. Whisler passed his boyhood in Cicero Township, where he received what education he has. He was married, April 28, 1858, to Miss Sarah A. Carr, of this township, born June 5, 1842, daughter of Jacob Carr, deceased. To this union were born eight children, of whom six survive - Mary E., Theodore N., John W., Edward W., Harvey W. and Arty Carl. In the spring of 1860, he removed to where he has since resided, and cleared fifty acres. Mr. Whisler is a Republican; has held some minor township offices, and is an esteemed citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


DELAVAN WILKINS was born in Hamilton, Ohio, May 11, 1817, being one of the six children of Philip and Mary (Van Clief) Wilkins, the former a native of Pennsylvania, the latter of Maryland. Delavan was early left fatherless, and necessitated to labor for the family for 12-1/2 cents per day; he therefore obtained but meager education. On reaching his majority, he began life for himself, and devoted his wages to his mother. On May 31, 1839, he was married to Miss Rebecca Crisman, of Hamilton County, born 1825, daughter of Adam Crisman, by which union ten children were born, six of whom are living - Christian, William, Malinda, Delavan, George and Mary R. After marriage, Mr. Wilkins began farming on rented land, soon after which he sustained a serious injury to his right leg from a scythe; this rendered him unable to labor for one year, rendering himself and family nearly destitute; they now moved to Marion County, and rented land within nine miles of Indianapolis, traveling by wagon, losing a horse on the may, arriving in their locality in March, 1847; here he labored very hard, getting 50 cents a bushel for corn, and paving $80 a year for his farm. After this, he located upon other land, for which he paid $230 a year; here he farmed and raised stock. In the spring of 1864, he returned to this county and purchased eighty acres, which he sold, buying that on which he now resides, having cleared eighty acres, and erected good buildings and improvements; he has now 120 acres. Mr. Wilkins has been a leading hog and cattle raiser, and has taken many prizes therefore; he is now a Republican, but was formerly a Democrat.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


ELI WRIGHT was born April 6, 1850 ; he is a son of Iredell and Julia A. (Moore) Wright, the former a native of Wayne County, Ind., the latter of Virginia. Iredell Wright, when a young man, came West to occupy land which his father had entered on Big Duck Creek. While boarding with a Mr. Thomas Moore, he married his daughter - Julia A., whose parents were pioneers. Soon after marriage, Mr. Wright erected a log cabin on what has been for forty years the "Wright farm." He ransomed from the forest a home of 160 acres, to which he afterward added various improvements; he was a good trader, a large stock-dealer, a Democrat, and, for eleven years, Township Trustee, and County Commissioner at his death, January 19, 1875. He was the second wealthiest man in Madison Township; his venerable wife resides at Elwood. Eli Wright obtained a fair common school education, and when he became of age began life for himself. In 1872, he located three miles north of Elwood, residing with a sister, and working on his farm for two years; he then returned to the homestead, and remained until after his father's decease, when he removed to his present residence. On November 7, 1879, he married Miss Ida Starkey, of this county, born April 4, 1863, and daughter of Steward Starkey, a pioneer of this township; three children followed this union Herman, Bessie and Claudie. Mr. Wright is an active Democratic politician, and in 1883 was a candidate for Sheriff of the county.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


MORGAN WRIGHT was born in Wayne County, Ind., September, 14, 1835, and is the eldest of the five children of William and Margaret (McCoy) Wright, both natives of Wayne County, whose grandparents were early settlers of that county, and located on Nolan's Fork. When Morgan was one year old, his parents removed to Hancock County and settled in the forest, where he was reared to manhood and obtained some education. At eighteen years of age, he began life for himself, and came to this county in 1852. On September 17, 1856, he was married to Miss Celia Philpott, of this township, born in Fayette County, September 16, 1838, daughter of Martin Philpott, who located here in 1832. Seven children blessed this union, six of whom survive - William E., John M., George B. McClellan, Josephus, Celia E. and Julia A. Mr. Wright was without means after his marriage, but by providence and industry improved his fortunes. In 1857, he received a legacy of $1,000, with which he purchased eighty acres in this township, where he lived some years, afterward purchasing the old Philpott farm, on which he resides; he now owns about 400 acres, 380 of which are in this township. Mr. Wright is an active Democrat. He was elected County Commissioner in 1875, and served with general favor. He is a member of the Masonic body and a Patron of Husbandry.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


DANIEL YOHE was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, February 11, 1844; his father, David Yohe, was a native of Pennsylvania, and at his majority moved to Dayton, Ohio, where he followed his trade of tailoring, and was married. He changed to Greencastle and then to Pyrmont, where his wife died; he married again, and in 1859 came with his family to Tipton County, bought eighty acres of forest land, which his sons improved while he worked at his trade, and died in September, 1870, aged fifty-nine years. He had been a Democrat in politics, and had served through the war with Mexico. Daniel Yohe, at the age of eighteen months, was left motherless, and was reared by Lewis Mundhenk, a pioneer of Montgomery County, Ohio, until fourteen years old, when he came to this county with his father, whom he assisted three years, and then enlisted in July, 1862, in Company G, Seventy-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Among the engagements in which he took part were those of Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga and Mission Ridge; he was also with Sherman at Atlanta, and was in the grand review at Washington; he received his discharge in June, 1865, returned home, and worked as a farm hand five years, and September 8, 1870, married Mrs. Mary R. (Myerly) Stevens, daughter of George Myerly, and born February 9, 1833. To this marriage was born one child - Mary M., who died at the age of seven months. Mrs. Yohe was the mother of seven children by her first husband, two of whom are still living - Josephus F. and Mary E. Mr. Yohe has now a fine farm of 183 acres, with a large brick dwelling and other improvements. He is a Democrat, and has held several township offices.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Madison Township


Deb Murray