JAMES RECOBS was born in Fayette County, Ohio, January 12, 1879, and is the son of Frederick Recobs; he was reared upon a farm, and engaged in agricultural pursuits in Ohio until 1849, when he removed to Tipton County, Ind., and followed blacksmithing for about twelve years; he then farmed in different parts of Cicero Township, and in 1864 purchased 160 acres of land in Section 24, of this township, thirty acres of which were under cultivation; his farm is now well drained with tile, and has 150 acres under cultivation; in 1877, he built a commodious brick residence, and has a good barn and other outbuildings; he raises an average of fifty bushels of corn to the acre, and from fifteen to twenty-five bushels of wheat. In August, 1847, Mr. Recobs enlisted in the Mexican war, in Company D, Second Ohio, and served in Scott's army as far west as the city of Puebla, where he was stationed; he was discharged in July, 1848. He was married, October 30, 1848, in Fayette County, Ohio, to Miss Lydia C. Burnett. They had thirteen children, eight of whom are living - Jane Ann, Mary E., Verell F., Robert M., John H., Gay, Freddie and Samuel J. Mr. Recobs is a prominent citizen, is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and politically is identified with the Democratic party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


JOHN Q. SHAW, carpenter, and former Superintendent of the County Farm, was born in Butler County, Ohio, September 7, 1839. When he was about five years old, his parents removed to Rush County, where Mr. Shaw spent his boyhood days. At the age of nineteen, he removed to Tipton County, and has since resided here. He served an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade in Rush County, and has since followed this trade in connection with farming. He was married, July 13, 1859, in Tipton County, to Miss Mary E. Warner. They have a family of eight children - Sarah J., Polly D., James T., Temillis, Asher, Clarence, Maud Capitola and Osa. Mr. Shaw owns fifty-four acres of land in Cicero Township, thirty-four acres of which are under cultivation. He is a prominent citizen, and an active member of the Democratic party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


JOHN SIESS, farmer, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, May 9, 1843. He came to America in 1860, and located in Decatur County, Ind. There he remained until 1872, when he came to Tipton County and engaged in farming. He now owns a good farm of ninety acres in Section 33 of Cicero Township. Mr. Siess was married, in 1873, to Miss Catherine Stewart, a daughter of Stephen Stewart. They have two children - Oscar and Lewis Stephen. Mr. Siess is a successful farmer, has his farm in good order, and in the year 1883 built a barn 45x50 feet.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


ROBERT SINGLETON, a prominent farmer of Cicero Township, was born in the North of Ireland February 15, 1826, and remained in his native country until he was eighteen years of age. He then emigrated to America and located in Boston, where he worked in a factory about seven years. In 1852, he went to California and engaged in mining. He had but $23 when he arrived in California, and when he came away, in 1865, he had saved $2,000. He then came to Tipton County, Ind., spent a short time in buying cattle, and subsequently purchased a farm of 160 acres, on which he has since resided. His farm is well drained, with 130 acres under cultivation. He raises grain and stock, and is a successful farmer. Mr. Singleton was married, March 30, 1856, in Tipton County, to Miss Elizabeth Hall, daughter of Hudson Hall. They have four children living - John H., James M., Ida and Nannie C.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


ISAAC N. SPRINGER, son of Newton I. Springer, was born in Washington County, Penn., June 22, 1837. At the age of sixteen, he came with his parents to Tipton County, where he remained with his father on a farm until he arrived at manhood. He then engaged in farming for himself, and now owns a small farm of thirty acres in Cicero Township; his farm is in good condition, is well drained, and all except three acres is under cultivation. Mr. Springer was married in Hamilton County, Ind., November 27, 1859, to Miss Lovina M. Roadrick. They have five children living - Albert N., Sarah M., Etta M., Cora M. and Susan I. Mr. Springer is identified with the Republican party, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


STEPHEN STEWART, farmer, was born in Montgomery County, Ky., June 7, 1822. At the age of fifteen, he went to McDonough County, Ill., and remained about eight years, after which he removed to Bartholomew County, Ind. In September, 1854, he came to Tipton County and purchased 297 acres of timber land in Cicero Township; he has sold 140 acres of this, and bought other lands, and now owns 376 acres in Cicero Township, of which 265 acres are under a high state of cultivation and well drained. He raises grain extensively, and usually puts out 100 acres in corn, and 60 in wheat. Mr. Stewart was married, April 11, 1848, in Bartholomew County, Ind., to Miss Emma M. Ruddick. This union has been blessed with ten children - Robert O., William P., Catharine, Amy, Jane, Laura, John, Antony, Ida E., deceased, and one infant deceased. Mr. Stewart is a well-to-do farmer, owning besides his farm land, a good dwelling in Tipton.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


WILLIAM H. SUMMERS, farmer and tile-maker, is a native of Missouri, and was born January 30, 1843; his father, William Summers, removed to Hamilton County, Ind., when our subject was but nine years of age. Mr. W. H. Summers was reared on a farm in Hamilton County, and enlisted in the United States service August 11, 1862, and served until June 16, 1865; he enlisted in Company B. Seventy-fifth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and participated in battle at Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, was in Sherman's campaign to Savannah, through to Raleigh, thence to Richmond, Va. Mr. Summers was married September 6, 1866, in this county, to Miss Maria Smith. This union has been blessed with two children - Bertha M. and Asher B. Mr. Summers owns a small farm of twenty-five acres, and in 1879 purchased a half-interest in a tile factory, and subsequently purchased the entire business. He manufactures about $1,700 worth of tile annually; he is identified with the Republican party, and takes an active interest in politics.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


CHARLES TEAL, farmer, is a native of Sweden, where he was born December 5, 1840. He is the son of Charles G. Teal, who was born in Sweden in 1803 and remained in his native country until 1852, when he emigrated to America, settled in Tipton County, Ind., bought a small farm, and resided there the remainder of his life. During his residence in Sweden, he served for many years in her standing army, and saw a great deal of military service. He was married in his native land, at the age of twenty-three, to Miss Mary C. Thorman, and by her was the father of three children, of whom our subject is the eldest. His death, caused by an accident while engaged in raising a barn, occurred May 19, 1866. His widow died September, 1879. Charles, the subject of this sketch, grew to manhood on a farm, and then engaged in tilling the soil of rented land. He is now the owner of 118 acres of land in Cicero Township. Tipton County, and eighty acres in Jackson Township, Hamilton County. He has 216 acres under cultivation, well drained by tile drains at a cost of $1,200. He has a good residence, a commodious barn, 36x74 feet, and a straw barn 31x88 feet, a windmill for watering his stock, and 85,000 worth of the most improved agricultural implements. The fertility of the soil of his land is sufficient to enable it to produce from forty to sixty bushels of corn and twenty bushels of wheat to the acre. Altogether Mr. Teal's farm is the best equipped, and one of the most desirable in the borders of Tipton County. During the winter, he manufactures a great amount of barrel heading, using two ten-horse-power portable threshing engines to run the machinery. Besides this, he owns two sets of French buhrs, with which he grinds the feed for his stock, and also for the stock of many of his neighbors. He was married, August 31, 1862, in this county, to Miss Elizabeth Sumner. They have three sons - Franklin, William and Jesse. Mr. Teal is a member of the I. O. O. F. Politically, he is of the Republican persuasion. He is one of the most enterprising and most esteemed men in the county.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


SAMUEL L. THOMPSON was born in Hamilton County, Ind. September 18, 1841, and was reared in his native county. He attended the common schools, and later the Union High School at Westfield two years. He then engaged in teaching several winters, farming through the summer months. In 1870, he removed to Tipton County, Ind., purchased a farm of 160 acres in Cicero Township, and resided there till the fall of 1882, when he sold his farm. In the spring of 1853, he purchased 120 acres in Section 19, in Cicero Township, and moved upon it. His farm is well drained, with ninety acres under cultivation. Mr. Thompson was married, September 21, 1865, in Tipton County, to Miss Lucy H. Houser. They have had six children - Indiana P., Edith B., Lillian A., Lena V., Isaac M. (deceased) and Samuel W. (deceased). Mr. Thompson enlisted March 16, 1865, in Company G, One Hundred and Forty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged the 17th of the following August.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


ROBERT W. TODD was born in Franklin County, Ind., July 29, 1841. He is the son of George Todd, Sr., who was born in New Jersey in 1812, and who located when quite young in Butler County, Ohio, and after, in Franklin County, Ind. In the last-named county, he was married, in 1840, to Miss Mary A. Sizelove, and remained there until 1864, when he removed to Tipton County and settled on a tract of 160 acres of land, situated in Sections 29 and 30, Cicero Township. In the last-named section, he built a residence, which he made his home until his death, which occurred February 20, 1875, at the age of sixty-three. Of his 160 acres of land, about eighty were under cultivation. His widow still survives him and resides at the old home. She has the following children, namely, Robert W., Joseph S., George L., Ezra N., Francis M., Clement V. and Lemuel S. Robert W., the subject of this sketch, was reared in Franklin County. In 1865, he came to Tipton County, and has since made this his home. On coming to this county, he farmed a tract of eighty acres located in Wild Cat Township. About 1868, he removed to Cicero Township, Section 30, on s farm of eighty acres. He is also the owner of eighty acres in section 29, of the same township. Of all this land, he has about eighty acres under cultivation. Mr. Todd has been three times married. First, in Grant County, Ind., March 25, 1866, to Miss Isabelle D. Smith, who died in February, 1867. His second marriage occurred in Tipton County, November 29, 1868, to Louisa E. Friend, who departed this life June 9, 1875. His last marriage occurred August 21, 1876, to Amanda J. Russel1, his present wife. He is the father of two children by his second and third wives, respectively named Worthington E. and Everet Alton. Politically, Mr. Todd is a vigorous Democrat.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


DILLARD VAN BUSKIRK, farmer, is a native of Wayne County, Ind., and was born May 1, 1818. He was reared in Henry County, Ind., where he attended the common schools. He worked by the month at the carpenter's trade, and subsequently took up contracting and building. In the spring of 1850, he removed to Tipton County and has since made this his home, except two years spent in Fulton County. He owns a farm of seventy-nine acres in Cicero Township, on which he moved in 1857. He has since resided on this and has about sixty acres under cultivation. Mr. Van Buskirk was married, December 16, 1841, in Henry County, Ind., to Miss Rebecca Paul. They have had nine children - Mary E., Sarah A., Amanda, Samuel, Emeretta, Helen D., Robert M., Thomas Benton (deceased) and George W. (deceased). Joseph Van Buskirk, the father of our subject, was born in Kentucky in 1794, and came to Indiana about 1815; he was a blacksmith and pursued his trade for some time, and subsequently engaged in farming; he was married in Wayne County, Ind., in 1816, to Miss Mollie Huff; he located in Tipton County about 1844, and here resided nttil his death, which occurred in June, 1866.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


JEHU VAN BUSKIRK, Deputy Surveyor and ex-Surveyor, is a native of Henry County, Ind., and was born September 22, 1826. He is the son of Joseph Van Buskirk. Our subject engaged in teaching the early part of his life, and was elected to the office of Surveyor of Tipton County by the Democratic party in 1872, and was twice re-elected, serving six successive years. He was previously elected in 1856, and served one term, and has also been Deputy Surveyor much of the time since. During the falls of the last four years, Mr. V. has operated a sorghum factory, and does the grinding by steam. He owns a good home of twenty-six acres of fertile land, with eighteen acres under cultivation. He heats his sitting room by register from the cellar below. His barn has brick basement, and is arranged so that he can drive into the second story. The roof is self-supporting, and the barn has no timbers in the way of storage. Mr. Van Buskirk was married, in June, 1861, to Miss Martha Small, who died about a year after their marriage. In July, 1868 he was married to Elizabeth Carr, of this county. Mr. Van Buskirk has a family of three children - Sallie, Mamie and Cora. About the year 1853, he became a Christian, and about the same time signed a temperance pledge and a tobacco pledge. He has since faithfully kept all his pledges. In the winter of 1855-56, he attended a course of medical lectures in Cincinnati, since which time he has acted as his own physician.

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"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


GRANVILLE VERNON, a native of Rockingharn County, N. C., was born May 9, 1824, and is a son of Green and Telistia Vernon. His parents removed to Shelby County, Ind., in 1831, where our subject was reared and educated. He engaged in farming in Shelby County, and was there married, February 24,1846, to Miss Sarah Hennes, born December 12,1828. In 1857, he removed to Hancock County, Ind., where he remained two years, and in 1859 sold his farm and removed to Tipton County. He purchased eighty acres in Section 19, in Cicero Township, which he subsequently sold, and purchased eighty acres in Section 20, which he now owns. He has about forty-five acres under cultivation, and well drained. He is a member of the Democratic party, and the Plum Grove Grange, No. 181. He and wife are members of the Christian Church. They have a family of eight children - Mary J., Sarah E., Richard B., Matilda F., Nancy E., Barbara A., Daisy D. and Alice M. His father's death occurred in Sullivan County, Ind., in March, 1871. His mother, aged seventy-eight, is still living, and resides in Sullivan County.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


GEORGE V. WAMSLEY was born in Franklin County, Ind., December 28, 1850, and is the son of Lawrence N. Wamsley. He was reared on a farm in his native county, and engaged in agricultural pursuits when he began life for himself. He owned a farm of sixty-three acres in Franklin County, and continued farming there until August, 1880, when he sold his farm and removed to Tipton County. Here he purchased 100 acres of land in Section 33, Cicero Township, and has since added sixty acres. He has 120 acres under cultivation and well drained. He was married, December 28, 1876, in Franklin County, Ind., to Miss Lydia Gephart. They have a family of three children Irena May, Alton L. and Wilber. Mr. Wamsley is a highly respected citizen and an energetic farmer.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


DAVID WIGGINS, farmer, was born in Lancaster, Penn., June 1, 1835. He was reared in his native county and there engaged in blacksmithing. In 1865, he removed to Hamilton County, Ind., where he followed farming and blacksmithing. He purchased thirty acres of land in that county, and remained there until 1877, when he traded this farm for eighty acres of land in Cicero Township, Tipton County; he located on this, and has added to it until now he has a farm of 120 acres, well drained, of fertile soil, and with seventy-five acres under cultivation. Mr. Wiggins was married in Lancaster County, Penn., January 28, 1862, to Miss Mary Nagle. They have eight children living - John E., George S., William M., Sarah E., Ida M., Angeline, Bertha and David.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


JOHN WINANS, farmer, owns sixty acres of good land in Section 30, Cicero Township, Tipton County. He is a native of Harrison County, Ky., and was born October 18, 1836, and is the son of John Winans. He spent his boyhood days in Scott County, Ky.; and engaged in the distillery business. In 1859, he came to Indianapolis and began butchering for some time, and in 1865 enlisted in the United States service in Company I, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served about six months. He then returned to Indianapolis and worked in a saw mill, and in the fall of 1865 came to Tipton County, where he worked in a saw mill for some time. He then engaged in farming, which occupation he has since continued. In November, 1882, he purchased sixty acres in Section 30, where he still lives. He was married in this county, April 4, 1867, to Miss Caroline M. Clark. They have two children, Oscar C. and Laura J. Mr. Winans is a Democrat in politics, is an Odd Fellow and a member of the G. A. R.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


JONATHAN WOLVERTON, a native of Northumberland County, Penn., was born November 13, 1828. He was reared in Butler County, Ohio, and engaged by the month working on a farm. In 1853, he came to Decatur County, where he followed agricultural pursuits until October, 1862, when he removed to Tipton County, Ind., and located on eighty acres of timbered land. He now owns 176 acres of good land, with 120 acres under cultivation; he raises about fifty bushels of corn and fifteen bushels of wheat per acre; his land is well drained, has good out buildings, and a first-class residence; he raises a fair amount of both hogs and cattle. Mr. Wolverton was married, November 22, 1355, in Decatur County, Ind., to Miss Corlinda A. Barr, who died November 26, 1856, leaving one child living, Joseph W. Mr. Wolverton was next married, June 24, 1857, to Miss Martha Barr. They have four children living - Axie A., Wilbur W., Mattie L. and Annie; he has three children deceased - Henry F., Levi S. and John N. The latter died at the age of sixteen years.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Cicero Township


W. K. ARMSTRONG was born in Cumberland County, Penn., December 12, 1812, and is the fourth of ten children born to James and Georgianna (Greenwood) Armstrong, both natives of Pennsylvania, and of English descent. W. K. Armstrong at the age of seventeen engaged as an apprentice at the tanner's trade. After serving his apprenticeship, he went to Plymouth, Richland County, Ohio, where he conducted a tannery and-harness shop, made boots and shoes, and superintended a farm. After continuing in business here many years, he sold out and engaged in the lumber business, operating a saw mill and grist mill; he subsequently located in Wyandot County, Ohio, where he farmed for three years. He then sold out and engaged in the hotel business in Crestline, Ohio, for two years, after which he returned to Wyandot County, and bought and sold five farms in six years; he then came to Tipton County, and engaged in the lumber business, and purchased 200 acres of land in the edge of Grant County; he conducted the lumber business alone for a few years, and in company with his son for seven years, after which he retired from business, and removed to his farm in Grant County. After selling this, he purchased in November, 1880, 128 acres of well-improved land in Wild Cat Township, and is now enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life. He started in life a poor boy, and through his own efforts has become an independent man. Mr. Armstrong was married at Wellsburg, Va., February 28, 1836, to Miss Martha C. Connell. She was born March 27, 1817, and is the daughter of John Connell, who was a soldier under Gen. Harrison at the siege of Fort Meigs. They have had eleven children, five of whom are living - Harrison, lumberer and farmer; Philip, farmer; William, M. D., of Mexico, Ind.; Mary Elma and Benjamin Franklin. Mr. Armstrong was reared a Democrat, but is now a Republican. He is a liberal supporter of all home enterprises, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


WINSER AUSTIN, physician, is a native of West Virginia, and is the eldest of four children born to John and Margaret Austin; his father was a native of West Virginia, and of French and English descent; his mother was born in Maryland, of English and Welsh parentage. Our subject lived at home on the farm until he was fifteen years of age, after which he worked out as a farm hand three years; he obtained a good common school education, and read medicine for several years at intervals. At the age of nineteen, he enlisted in Company A, Third Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as Hospital Steward, serving four years on detached duty; he then veteranized in Company E, Sixth Regiment West Virginia Cavalry, a part of the Eighth Army Corps. They were in battle at McDowell, Va., at Cross Keys, Slaughter Mountain, and the second battle at Bull Run. They were on a raid through Virginia under Gen. Averill, after which they were mounted on fresh horses, and Mr. Austin was taken prisoner in West Virginia; he was taken to Libby Prison and there held sixty days, and then paroled by being a member of the Medical Departrnent. He was sent to Washington, and participated in the capture of Booth, the assassin; he was then sent to the Army of the West, remaining on the frontier until he was discharged, November 13, 1865; he then returned home, and subsequently engaged in the practice of medicine at Grandville, Ind., for three years. In the fall of 1869, he located at Windfall, where he has now a large, lucrative practice; he has attended different medical colleges, and has contributed to Indiana medical literature in the way of reports and essays; he has always been an active Republican, and is now Health Officer. Mr. Austin was married, December 14, 1865, to Miss Naoma Jacobs, who was born in West Virginia March 6, 1841. This union was blessed with five children - Hattie, Harry, Ray, Winser and Clarke. Mr. Austin and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


ASHLEY AYERS was born in Darke County, Ohio, March 18, 1827, and is the eldest son of Alfred and Sardes (Ashley) Ayers, natives respectively of Connecticut and New York, and both of English descent. At the age of ten, he came with his parents to Randolph County, Ind., while it was yet a forest; he assisted his father in redeeming from the forest a good home from land entered in 1837; his education was obtained from the log cabin schoolhouse; he began farming in 1848, on rented land, and in the fall of 1852 came to this county, locating on the farm where he now lives; he has been industrious and economical, and a good home is the result. Mr. Ayers was married in November, 1847, to Miss Desira Gist, of Randolph County, Ind. She died in 1854, leaving two sons, William and Silas. March 17, 1855, he married Miss Mary A. Adams, of Marion County, Ind. This union has been blessed with nine children, five of whom are living - Catharine, Edith Thena, Thomas E., Letitia and Maryetta. Mr. Ayers and wife are members of the Christian Church; he is a Republican in politics, and has held some of the minor offices of the township; he is one of our pioneer citizens, and is ever ready to encourage public improvements.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


NATHAN BAILEY, merchant, handling a general stock of dry goods and groceries, is a native of Randolph County, Ind., and was born May 11, 1842; he was the son of David and Elizabeth (Freeman) Bailey, of English descent. David Bailey was an early settler of Randolph County; he died March 19, 1860, in Tipton County, at the age of forty-two; his wife died previously in Randolph County. Nathan Bailey was reared on a farm, and spent his youth in Howard and Tipton Counties; he attended the pioneer schools, and at the age of thirteen began working on the farm; in 1859, he made a trip to Iowa, and in the spring of 1860 was called home by his father's death; he then enlisted in Company G, Thirty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, but soon after going out was taken sick and was subsequently discharged on account of disability; he returned home and recruited, and in the spring of 1864 enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, joining the Army of the Tennessee. Their time was mostly spent doing guard duty, and upon their return home, while riding on the top of the train, he was thrown off, fracturing both ankles and his right wrist; he was left at the hospital at Indianapolis, where be was honorably discharged; he was compelled to use crutches for fifteen months, after which he worked at the carpenter's trade; in 1867, be came to Windfall, where he operated a saw mill eighteen months; he then bought a third interest in Richard Freeman's general store, and for a number of years made numerous changes. In March, 1878, he and E. L. Pickering lost their goods, valued at $8,000, by fire, and subsequently he lost about $500 by burglars. After this, he purchased a small grocery stock, and has since added dry goods and boots and shoes. Mr. Bailey was married, June 6, 1869, to Miss Mary Olive Armstrong, of Windfall, Ind. She was born February 7, 1853, and is the daughter of Jefferson and Margaret A. (Taylor) Bailey, both natives of Indiana, and of English and Irish descent. They have two children, Attala J. and Bertie V. Mr. Bailey has been a life-long Republican; he is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


WILLIAM C. BANNON, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Hancock County, Ind., February 4, 1844, and is the second of three sons born to John D. and Anna R. (Richard) Bannon, both natives of Pennsylvania. He was left fatherless at the age of four, and in 1854 went to Iowa with William P. Chapman, with whom he lived for eight years, working on the farm. In the spring of 1862, he moved to Madison County, Ind., and subsequently enlisted in Company G, Twelfth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Gen. Logan. He engaged in battle at Jackson, Miss., Missionary Ridge, Dallas, Tenn., Kenesaw Mountain, New Hope Church, and the siege of Atlanta. He was honorably discharged after serving about three years. Returning to Hamilton County, he engaged in farming on rented land for two years, when he purchased forty acres. In the fall of 1872, he removed with his family to this township, and purchased his present home of eighty acres, on which he found twelve acres cleared and a small log cabin. He was married, August 27, 1865, to Miss Nancy E. Kinnaman, born February 26, 1849. This marriage has been blessed with nine children, six of whom are living - Henry, Jerry, Mazy, Jesse, William and Andrew. Mr. Bannon and wife are members of the Christian Church, and he is a Union Democrat, and has held some of the minor offices of the township.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


JACOB BARROW is a native of Madison County, and was born March 6, 1842. He is the son of James and Elizabeth (Denny) Barrow, natives of Kentucky, and of English descent. His father was an early settler in Madison County, and in 1849 removed with his family to Tipton County. He obtained a good home for his family before his death, which occurred in 1853. He had lived a consistent Christian life, as a member of the U. B. Church. His wife (aged seventy-two) still survives him, and resides with her son Jacob. Our subject was reared on the farm, but was deprived of any education, as he and his elder brother were the main supports of the family. He remained at home until his mother married again, and at the age of fourteen he began working for himself. Without any instructions, he built a wagon, doing all the wood-work, blacksmithing and painting, and when completed sold it for $120. He worked at wagon-making and farming until 1877, when he removed to Windfall and engaged in blacksmithing. He and brothers invented and patented "The Little Giant Stump Puller," which has since been twice improved. They have also invented and patented an elliptic engine, applicable for all purposes, also a wind engine, and a beltless governor for an engine, steam boiler and filtering heater. Mr. Barrow enlisted in the United States service in September, 1864, in the Fourth Indiana Light Artillery. He engaged in battle at Nashville, Tenn., and was honorably discharged in the fall of 1865. He is a Democrat, and has served as Justice of the Peace of Wild Cat Township. He was married, October 3, 1861, to Miss Rebecca A. Pumphrey, of Howard County; she was the daughter of Jackson Pumphrey. Mrs. Barrow died August 6, 1880, leaving four children - Dora, Zana A., Amanda J. and Lora Lee. About 1874, he was ordained as minister of the Gospel, and for years was a Baptist pastor. Ill health caused him to discontinue the ministry.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


SAMUEL BARROW, a leading inventor of Northern Indiana, is a native of Madison County, born March 23, 1844, and is a son of James Barrow; he worked on the farm until seventeen years old, and April 17, 1861, enlisted in Company D, Sixth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, three months' service. After this service, he re-enlisted in Company I, Fifty-first Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and participated in the battles of Perryville, Ky., Stone River, and in the famous raid of Col. Streight. Near Rome, Ga., Mr. Barrow was taken prisoner and held thirty days on Belle Island, when he was paroled. After being exchanged, he rejoined his regiment, took part in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, and accompanied Gen. Willick through Texas. He was honorably discharged as a veteran. He then returned to Tipton County and engaged in farming for four years. In 1869, with his brother David, he established a wagon shop in Windfall, where his brother Jacob joined the firm now known as Barrow Bros. They were inventors of '' The Little Grant Stump Puller," a wind engine, steam engine, governor and boiler, etc. Mr. Barrow was married, July 19, 1867, to Miss Alice Woolley, of Tipton County, daughter of William Woolley. Mrs. Barrow was killed by lightning in 1876, and left one daughter Rosalie Magnolia. Mr. Barrow is an active temperance man. In 1874, he was licensed to preach as a local minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


DAVID BARROW was born in Madison County, Ind., February 23, 1849, and is also a son of James Barrow. At the age of fifteen, he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was honorably discharged in 1864. When seventeen, he began an apprenticeship to carpentering, attending school during the winter for four seasons, thus acquiring a knowledge of the common branches. At the age of twenty-one, he became a partner with his brother Samuel in the manufacture of -wagons. In 1872, he opened a wagon shop in Howard County, which he conducted eight months, after which he took up farming. In 1877, he purchased a half interest in the wagon manufactory of Samuel Barrow, the firm being known as S. Barrow & Bro. Later, he became a member of the firm of Barrow Bros. He is well versed in music, which he has taught, both vocal and instrumental. Mr. Barrow is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and an active worker in the Sabbath school; also a member of the I. O.O. F.; he is a Republican and a temperance man.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


PERRY BEHYMER is a native of Clermont County, Ohio, and was born December 4, 1850. He is the eldest son of nine children born to William and Martha (Littleton) Behymer, natives of Kentucky and Ohio, and of German and English descent. His father was a cooper by trade, but for the last thirty years has given his attention to farming. William Behymer removed to Rush County, Ind., in 1853, and in 1861 located in Grant County. He now resides in Rigdon, Grant County. He has served as Justice of the Peace, and now holds the position of Notary Public. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Perry Behymer spent his boyhood on the farm, having access to the common schools. At the age of eighteen he attended one summer term of seventy days, after which he received a twelve months' license to teach in Tipton County. He taught twelve terms in succession in Tipton, Grant and Madison Counties, and was Principal of the Windfall High School in 1876-77, continuing two terms of nine months each. He attended one term of seventeen weeks in the Normal School of Lebanon, Ohio. Soon after he began teaching at Windfall, he commenced reading law, and assisting as junior editor upon the Windfall News. In the summer of 1877, he and his brother became editors of this paper, which they published until May, 1880. Having purchased the Tipton Times, they removed to Tipton and united the strength of the News with the Times. This they conducted one year with a circulation of 900. After this, Mr. Behymer retired from the editorial work and returned to Windfall, where he soon after engaged in the practice of law, having been admitted to the bar in Tipton County in 1879. He has met with success in his practice. Mr. Behymer was married, March 14, 1872, to Miss Mary E. Legg, who died May 16, 1872. He was next married, March 11, 1880, to Miss Julia A. Graham, of this county, and daughter of Hollingsworth Graham. Mr. Behymer is a Democrat in politics, and has served as School Trustee, and as President of the School Board. In 1878, he was a candidate for County Superintendent, and was defeated by one vote. He is a highly respected citizen, and his wife is a consistent member of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


W. H. BUTLER, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Wayne County, Ind., June 14, 1819, and is a son of Eli and Jane (Buzan) Butler, natives of Georgia and Kentucky respectively. These parties came to Indiana with their parents while it was a Territory, where they married and reared a family of nine children. Eli Butler was s farmer, and in 1827 located in Rush County, where he entered land and continued twenty-five years, when he removed to Marion County and passed the remainder of his days, dying at the age of eighty his wife followed a few years later at the age of eighty-five. The subject of this sketch, at the age of twenty-one, began in life empty handed. He worked at job work and as a farm hand for five years, when he settled upon forty acres he had purchased in Marion County, and remained there five years. This he sold, and in the spring of 1860 came to Tipton County and located on the farm where he now lives. Here he found a log cabin, and began to clear a home from the forest, experiencing all the privations of pioneer life. He now has a good and well improved farm. Mr. Butler was married, January 1, 1845, to Miss Sarah R. Dilliner, born in Pennsylvania September 25, 1824, a daughter of Augustine Dilliner. They have nine children - Elizabeth J., Phoebe A., George L., Smith D., Jesse W., Susan A., Marion F., John A. and Sylvanus S. Mr. Butler is identifiedwith the Democratic party, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


WILLIAM T. CLAWSON, landlord and liveryman, was born in Wayne County, Ind., October 13, 1834, and is one of nine children born to Abnor and Elizabeth (White) Clawson. Abnor Clawson came with his brother to Wayne County in 1812. Their parents followed in the fall. This family redeemed from the forest a good home, and here Abnor was married, and reared a family of nine children. He accumulated a good farm of 260 acres, besides property in Richmond. His wife died in 1865, aged sixty-three; he died in 1870, aged seventy-six. William T. Clawson, at the age of eighteen, engaged as an apprentice, for one year, at plow-making. He then worked as journeyman eight or nine years. Then he firmed on the homestead for four years. Subsequently he invented and manufactured the "Empire Plow," a successful double corn plow. Still later, after renting and farming three years, he and Mathew Charles operated the Fairview Dairy for three years. They invented and patented a "milk carrier and refrigerator," which proved a success. From this time Mr. Clawson engaged in farming in different localities, and in dairying, until 1882, when he went into the hotel and livery business in Windfall. He entertains the traveling public in the best of style, and has as a partner in the livery business W. R. Bailey. Mr. Clawson has long been a Republican in politics, and is an Odd Fellow. He was married June 6, 1861, to Miss Mary E. Warman, of Wayne County. Five children have blessed this union, four of whom are living Frank W., Emma E., Edward E. and Nellie B.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


SIMEON CLEM, farmer, is a native of Shenandoah County, Va., and was born December 17, 1820. He is the son of John and Juliana (Moyers) Clem, natives of Virginia, and of German descent. John Clem was a farmer, who spent his life in Shenandoah County. A few months before his death, he removed to Page County, Va., and there died in 1828. He was a highly esteemed citizen, and was a soldier in the war of 1812. Our subject remained upon the home farm until he was twenty-one, when he began farming and operating a flouring mill. After this he worked at job work three years; then went to Ohio, and afterward farmed in Rockingham County, Va., on rented land. In 1856, he located in Madison County, Ind., where he remained until 1863. He then located in Henry County, and, in the spring of 1866, removed to this county and located on forty acres purchased the previous year. Mr. Clem was married, February 9, 1847, to Miss Margaret Wetzel, of Shenandoah County, Va. She was born March 2, 1821. This union has been blessed with six children, three of whom are living - John, born December 14, 1847; George, born June 8, 1849; Lydia F., born August 29, 1860, wife of W. L. Moore. He is a Republican in politics, and cast his first vote for President Lincoln, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Wild Cat Township


Deb Murray