Henry Husted, banker, Liberty. No man in Union County is better known or more universally respected by all than this gentleman. He is a native of Harmony Township, where he was born July 26, 1829. His parents, John and Abigail (Dubois) Husted, were natives of New Jersey, where they were reared and married, and where they resided until 1817, when they came to the territory of this county and began the task of the pioneer in what is now Harmony Township, which required no small amount of hard work; but, being nerved with brave hearts and strong arms, they overcame all obstacles and secured a competence against want. To them was born a family of six sons and six daughters, two of whom (a son and daughter) were born in New Jersey. Mr. Husted was a soldier of the war of 1812, and is one of the few survivors and pensioners of that war. He was a strong anti-slavery man, and on the repeal of the Missouri Compromise and the dissolution of the old Whig party he became identified with the Republican organization, and has acted in its ranks ever since. Since the death of his wife, which occurred in 1864, Mr. Husted has made his home with his children in this and other counties in Indiana, and is well known and highly respected by all. Henry Husted, until he was seventeen years of age, labored faithfully with his father, assisting in all the hard work by which people of that period were necessarily surrounded. At that age, he was apprenticed to the tailorís trade with Mr. G. W. Adams of Fairfield, Ind. (now of Greensburg, this State), with whom he remained some four years, when for some time he worked as a journeyman in different portions of Indiana and Ohio. He was united in marriage with Miss Rebecca A. Doughty in 1854, and to this union were born two children, viz: Cora, now the wife of A. E. Johnson, one of the well known and prominent young business men of Liberty; and Frank, who died when a child. Mrs. Husted was born in Butler County, Ohio, June 27, 1835, and died February 25, 1859. Previous to his marriage, Mr. Husted had come to Liberty, and was there working at his trade, when, in 1855, he was elected Recorder of Union County, a position he filled for four years, with much credit to himself and lasting benefits to those for whom he labored. He then worked at his trade until 1861, when he was appointed Postmaster at Liberty by President Lincoln. In 1863, he enlisted as a private in Company D, Ninth Indiana Volunteer Cavalry, and while in camp at Indianapolis was appointed Quartermaster-Sergeant of his company. He held this position until February 9, 1865, when he was appointed Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeant of the Ninth Indiana Cavalry. March 5, 1865, he was appointed a First Lieutenant and Regimental Quartermaster by Gov. O. P. Morton, positions he filled until the close of the war. After his return home, he worked at his trade about a year, when he was elected County Treasurer, and two years later was re-elected to that responsible position, each time having for his competitors some of the most popular men in the county, over whom he was elected by good majorities, an evidence of the confidence reposed in his honesty and integrity by his friends and neighbors. Mr. Husted has held other positions of honor and trust, and in all the offices to which he has been elected by his fellow-citizens he has discharged the duties honestly and faithfully. On the 7th of February, 1861, he was united in marriage with Miss Lottie J. Walton, who was born April 26, 1845, in Union County. By this union there are three children, viz.: Frank, Harry and Morris. At the expiration of his term of office as County Treasurer, Mr. Husted resumed his trade, which he worked at about two years, when he sold out and accepted a position in the Union County National Bank as Assistant Cashier. After a few years, he was elected Cashier of the bank, a position he now holds. He began life a poor boy, and is, in the fullest sense of the word, a self-made man. His education is respectable, and taking into consideration the limited means afforded him in his youth, is highly creditable to his habits of perseverance, industry and studiousness. He formerly voted with the Democratic party, but since Lincolnís time has voted and acted with the Republican organization, and has ever since taken an active part for the success of its principles. He is a member of the Masonic order, and has taken the Commandery degrees. At home he enjoys a degree of personal popularity acquired by but few men. His deportment is affable and gentlemanly, and his kindness of heart is a subject of remark among his friends, and wealth, if it was his, would be as freely applied to relieve the wants of others as to provide for his own necessities.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 65 and 66.


Daniel Husted, farmer, P. O. Liberty, was born in Harmony Township, Union Co., Ind., November 26, 1831. His parents, John and Abigail (Dubois) Husted, were natives of Cumberland County, N. J., where they were reared and married, and where two of their twelve children were born. In 1817, they came to this county, settling in Harmony Township, where they engaged in farming, and where they lived until the death of Mrs. Husted in 1864. Mr. Husted is yet living, and resides in Montgomery County, Ind. He was a soldier of the war of 1812, a Whig and a strong anti-slavery man, and in later life a Republican. The subject of our sketch was reared on a farm and received a common school education. He lived at home and worked for his father until his marriage with Miss Parmelia J. Fall August 20, 1856. Miss Fallís father, Justus Fall, was born in the old North State in 1801, and came to this county with his parents in 1806, where he was raised and received such education as schools of that early day afforded. While a young man, he went to Eaton, Ohio, and learned the carpenterís trade. He then returned to this county and resided here and in Fairfield, Franklin County, working at his trade for some years. He married Miss Rebecca Serring in 1822. She was born in Harrison County Ky., in 1802,and with her parents, Solomon and Rachel (Adams) Serring, came to this county in 1820 and settled in Harmony Township. Mr. Fall, after his marriage, carried on his trade for some time, when he engaged in farming, which he followed the remainder of his days. He was a hardworking man and a good citizen. He and his wife made all they possessed by industry and economy. He died in 1881. His widow still survives him. He was a Democrat, but never aspired to any political honors. At his death, he owned 220 acres of well-improved land. In his family were the following children, viz.: Phebe A. (deceased) and Parmelia J. When his parents came to this county, they settled four miles north of Liberty. His mother died on the way, and the daughters kept house. Mr. Husted, subject of this sketch, is the father of eight children, four living, viz., Rebecca A., Anna M., John F. and Albert; and four dead, viz., Sarah, Martha, Minerva and one that died in infancy. Since his marriage, he has made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Fall. He takes great interest in schools and matters of public welfare. He is a Republican and a good farmer. Mr. Husted is one of the reliable citizens of Liberty Township.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 66.


A. E. Johnson, Assistant Cashier Union County National Bank, Liberty, was born in the village of Cuba, Clinton Co., Ohio, on the 6th of February, 1854. His parents are James H. and Mary (Reed) Johnson, natives of Warren County, Ohio, born, the former near the village of Hopkinsville, May 25, 1829, and the latter January 26, 1828. They were married in their native county, where the father had been reared upon his fatherís farm. He subsequently ďpicked upĒ the shoe-makerís trade, which he followed for a few years only, and later removed to Cuba in the adjoining county of Clinton, and there embarked in mercantile business, in which he was successful. Here he remained until the fall of 1865, when he removed to Liberty, and engaged in the same business, which he has followed until of late years. He is now serving his fourth term of four years each as a Justice of the Peace of the township. Both himself and wife are worthy citizens of the village. The grandparents of Mr. A. E. Johnson were James H. and Martha (Richey) Johnson, who, too, were natives of the territory which subsequently became the county of Warren, although their births occurred when it was the Northwest Territory. The Richey side of the family were of Scotch ancestry. Tracing the lineage of young Johnson another step, we come to Judge Michael H. Johnson, his great-grandfather, who has been given a place in the history of Warren County among the distinguished dead of that county, and from which work the following concerning him is taken: ďJudge Johnson was born in Virginia November 10, 1769. Having received a better English education than was common at that time, he went, when a young man, to Kentucky, where he taught school. He soon afterward moved to the north side of the Ohio, and served as Quartermaster-Sergeant under Gen. Wayne, and thus formed an intimate acquaintance with William Henry Harrison, as Ensign, a few years younger than himself. This acquaintance ripened into an ardent friendship. Their last meeting was at the Williamson House, in Lebanon, while Gen. Harrison was a candidate for the Presidency. Johnson was one of the first settlers at Deerfield, being there as early as 1797. According to the manuscript notes of Judge R. B. Harlan, M. H. Johnson sold goods at Deerfield for Mr. Hinkson, and was the first store-keeper in Warren County. About 1801, he moved to the high ground immediately north of Hopkinsville, where he resided until his death. He was appointed Assessor of Deerfield Township, Hamilton County, Northwest Territory, and afterward Auditor of Supervisorsí accounts for the same large township, embracing the greater part of Warren County. He received a commission from Gov. St. Clair as a Lieutenant in the Territorial militia. After the organization of Warren County, he was, in 1803, elected and commissioned one of the first Justices of the Peace of Hamilton Township, and discharged the duties of this office at intervals for about twelve years. He was the first Recorder of Warren County, and after the creation of the office of Auditor in 1820, he was the first person to hold that position in the county. In 1809, he was elected a member of the Senate of the General Assembly, and, in 1812, a Representative, serving in all seven terms in the Legislature between 1809 and 1819. In the last named year, he was commissioned by Gov. Brown Collector of taxes for the Second District. In 1825, he was elected by the Legislature an Associate Judge, and served in that position for about ten years.Ē In politics, Judge Johnson was a Jeffersonian or Anti-Federalist, and afterward an active and ardent Whig. On election days, he was always to be found at the polls. He died at his home, near Hopkinsville, in the seventy-seventh year of his age. Our subject received the benefit of a common school education, having attended the village schools of Cuba and Liberty. At the age of sixteen years, he began teaching school, and followed that occupation for five years, teaching in the schools of Union County. He then was Deputy Auditor of the county for about five years, serving under J. M. Duvall and the present Auditor, Daniel Snyder. He also served for several months of that period (in 1880) as a clerk in the House of Representatives (Indiana). On the 12th of May, 1875, he was married to Cora L., daughter of Henry Husted, a sketch of whose life appears in this work. Mr. Johnson was elected to his present position in October, 1881. He is a Mason and Odd Fellow, and in politics a Republican. One child, Nellie D., has been born to Mr. Johnson and wife.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 66.


Benjamin Jones, farmer, P. O. Billingsville, was born in Union County, Ind., August 11, 1847. He is one of a family of three children born to Phillip and Caroline (Girton) Jones, the former a native of Franklin County, Ind., and the latter of Butler County, Ohio. During the life-time of his first wife, he resided in this county, but after her death he married Lydia Bourne and moved to Franklin County, Ind., where he has since resided. By the second marriage there were five children. Mr. Jones is a prominent member of the Baptist Church. He is a Democrat, and in the county where he resides has held numerous positions of honor and trust. Benjamin Jones was raised upon his fatherís farm, receiving a good common school education. In 1871, he was united in marriage, with Miss Lourinda M. Sumpter, who was born in Union County, Ind., in 1849. By this union there are three children, viz.: Nora C., Besse E. and Clifford G. In 1873, Mr. Jones moved to his present place in this county, where he owns eighty acres, nicely improved. He also owns eighty acres in Shelby County, Ind. He is a successful farmer and stock-grower, a prominent Democrat, and a useful and public-spirited citizen.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 66.


Oliver Keffer, live-stock shipper, and farmer, P. O. Cottage Grove, was born in this county March 17, 1827. He is one of a family of six children born to George and Lucy (Gibbons) Keffer, both of whom were natives of Woodstock, Va. The father, on the breaking-out of the war of 1812, enlisted, and after serving his time out hired as a substitute, and served until the close of the war, the greater portion of the time being in and around Washington, D. C. He was a joiner and cabinet-maker by trade, and soon after the close of the war, like many young men at that time, came West to seek his fortune. He stopped for some time at Brookville, Ind., carefully saving his earnings, and after a few years purchased 160 acres of land in Union Township, this county, a portion of which is now owned and resided upon by his son John M. He was married at Camden, Ohio, where he spent one winter working at his trade. In the spring of 1820, he moved to his possessions in Union Township, where he ever after resided, farming, and at odd times working at his trade. He and wife were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and were esteemed by all who knew them. Mr. Keffer was a strong anti-slavery man, and an earnest advocate of all needed reforms and public enterprises that went to build up the country or benefit his fellow-man. He died February 25, 1863, and his wife November 4, 1881. Oliver Keffer was reared on a farm, receiving such education as the schools of that early day afforded. On reaching his majority, he began farming, and this, in connection with stock dealing, he followed some ten years. He then quit farming, and devoted his entire time to trading in live stock and grain. He has ever since continued in this business, with varied fortune, few shippers having so clean and honorable a record as he. His union with Miss Hulda Huddleston was celebrated April 4, 1853. She was born in this county, and died May 19, 1880. By this union there were four children, viz.: Mary E., Clara M., India B., and George O. Mr. Keffer has always voted with the Whig and Republican parties, but has never aspired to any political prominence. He owns eighty-five acres of well-improved land in Union Township, and a nice home property near the village of Cottage Grove. His reputation for honesty and fair-dealing is above reproach, and his social qualities, which are of a high order, have greatly contributed to make him one of the most popular and influential men of Union County.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 66.


W. O. Keffer, County Clerk, Liberty. This gentleman was born in Union Township, Union Co., Ind., September 5, 1849. His parents, Harrison and Phoebe A. (Huddleston) Keffer, were natives of Union County, Ind., the former born May 12, 1825, and the latter May 10, 1827. To them was born a family of four children. They always resided in Union County on a farm, although in early life Mr. Keffer worked at carpentering and cabinet-making. He is still a resident of Union County, and is one of its prominent and influential citizens. W. O. Keffer was reared upon a farm. He received a good education, having, in 1871, graduated from the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. After leaving school, he went to Anderson, Ind., and was there connected with the well-known law firm of Pierce & Thomson. After some time, he went to Minnesota, where he followed surveying and civil engineering for two years, a portion of the time being in the employ of the Northern Pacific Railroad in Dakota. He was also in the employ of the Central Iowa Railroad Company, for some time, as civil engineer. In all, he was away from his native county some three years. He was united in marriage with Miss Ann E. Maxwell June 13, 1874. This lady was born in Union County, Ind., March 19, 1851. By this union there are two children Ė Ira J. and Fred M. After returning from the west, Mr. Keffer taught a few terms of school. He was elected Clerk of the Union County Circuit Court in 1878, and re-elected in 1882. He is an efficient and popular official, and has the respect and confidence of all persons. He is a stanch Republican, a member of the Masonic order, and one of the prominent and popular young men of the county in which he resides.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 66.


Daniel Koerner, farmer, P. O. Billingsville, was born in Loudoun County, Va., September 21, 1824. His father, John G. Koerner, was a native of Saxony, Germany, and when about sixteen years of age left his native country to escape serving in the army, and, after wandering in different portions of Europe some years, came to the United States and stopped in Loudoun County, Va. Here he met and married Miss Catharaine Fry, a native of that county. In 1832, they came to this county, and the next year purchased the farm their son Daniel now owns in Harmony Township. Although owning a farm, Mr. Koerner, for the most part, worked at wagon and carriage making, his sons carrying on the farm. He was a strong anti-slavery man, frugal and industrious, and had the respect of all who knew him. He died December 3, 1876. His wife survives him at an advanced age. Daniel Koerner was reared on a farm, and from early boyhood was expected to perform a manís work, in consequence of which he received but a limited education. He learned the wagon and carriage makerís trade with his father, but after his marriage with Miss Elmira Dubois, which occurred April 3, 1849, he began farming the home place, and after some years, purchased it of his parents. His wife is a native of the township in which she resides, and was born February 27, 1830. They have four children Ė Minerva, Ellen, Elizabeth and Sylvanus. He and his wife own 280 acres of well-improved land, which they have obtained by industry and frugality. They are reading, intelligent people, and favor all laudable public and private enterprises. They are members of the United Brethren Church, and strongly opposed to all secret organizations. Mr. Koerner is a stanch Republican.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 66.


The Lafuze Family. Among the pioneer families emigrating to what subsequently became Union County, Ind., and who assisted materially in clearing out the forests and developing the country, was the family bearing the above name. In 1812, Samuel Lafuze and wife, Elenor (Harper) Lafuze, and their children emigrated from the State of Pennsylvania to Hamilton County, Ohio, and two years later removed to this locality, he having entered a tract of land where Ezra Lafuze now lives. He was of French and the wife of Irish descent. The children of this couple were William, Elizabeth Jane, Lydia, Mary, Samuel, John, Elenor, Margaret, Daniel, Johnson, Lavinia, Ezra. The father was a weaver by trade; he followed farming through life. His death occurred in 1861, and that of his wife in 1851, both at the time of their deaths being members of the Presbyterian Church. Daniel Lafuze (Center Township), a son of Samuel, was born on his fatherís farm April 29, 1815, and resided with his parents until 1844, when he removed to the farm adjoining, upon which he has ever since lived. His schooling was quite limited, not attending school at all after reaching his twelfth year, and but a short period during the winters of his earlier years. He was married, March 18, 1841, to Barbara Immel, a native of Pennsylvania, born February 16, 1822, and daughter of Joseph Immel. To this union were born Elizabeth, Ezra, Mary, Joseph, Irene, Huldah, Florence and Samuel, and one who died in infancy; of this number, four are deceased. Mr. Lafuze in his early life for a time was engaged in teaching school in Harrison and Brownsville Townships, but his life almost uninterruptedly has been passed in tilling the soil. His first purchase was a tract of eighty acres, to which he made additions until at one time his possessions were over 200 acres of land. His wife died September 4, 1873. He was again married, on the 10th of January, 1883, this time to Mrs. Mary Williams, daughter of Rev. Robert McMahon. Mrs. Williams is a native of Ireland. Mr. Lafuze is comfortably situated on the farm where many years of his life have been passed, and there spending the evening of life in the enjoyment of the accumulation of years of labor and toil. Samuel Lafuze (Brownsville Township), a brother of Daniel, was born in Fayette County, Penn., January 5, 1806, and until twenty-five years of age resided on the farm with his parents, he being the main farmer at the homestead. His educational advantages were meager, but, endowed with business tact, he was ever on the alert for an opportunity to make money, and, in connection with farming, for years was engaged in the fall and winter seasons in building barns and doing other carpenter work, a trade he picked up himself. He was engaged in such work at intervals for a number of years, and erected many of the first barns of the county, some of which are yet standing, which were built a half century ago. For a period he was engaged in operating a saw-mill on Richland Creek. March 26, 1840, he was united in marriage with Elizabeth Immel, who was born in Fayette County, Penn., February 10, 1820. She was a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Smith) Immel, the former a native of Maryland, and the latter of Fayette County, Penn. They settled in this county and State in 1830. To Samuel Lafuze and wife were born Mary A., Ellen, Samuel M., William H., Joseph, Leonidas H., Lucy I., John M., Levi C., Danford W., Oliver P. and George E. The parents are members of the Christian Church, and Mr. Lafuze in politics is a Republican. After marrying, he settled on the farm where he now resides, and, by habits of industry and economy, he became the possessor of upward of 2,100 acres of land, over 1, 000 acres of which were in Union County, and all of which came by his own earnings. He has given to nine of his children each a farm, and himself and wife have the satisfaction in their declining years of the knowledge that their children are all well fixed in life, and so conducting themselves as to be a comfort to their parents. William H. Lafuze (Harrison Township), a son of the parents just spoken of, was born in Union County, Ind., May 5, 1848; was reared on the farm where his father now resides, and there remained until 1872, when, on the 13th of March, he was married to Olive Creek, a native of Union County, Ind., born September 15, 1851, of parents Abram and Salina (Paddock) Creek. The former was a native of this county; he died in the spring of 1860. The mother is still living. To William H. Lafuze and wife have been born the following-named children: Perry C., Everett C. and Kenneth M. Mr. Lafuze, during the winter of 1869-70, attended the Friendsí Academy at Richmond, Ind. His previous schooling had all been received in the district schools of his neighborhood. In politics, he is a Republican. Both himself and wife are members of the Christian Church.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 66 and 67.


William W. Leviston, dealer in harness, hardware and agricultural implements, Liberty. Among the very first to settle within the present limits of the county of Union was George Leviston, grandfather of William W. Leviston, who was a native of Ireland. An account of the emigration and settlement of this pioneer has been given in the history of the county proper, to which the reader of this sketch is referred. James Leviston the father of William W., was a native of the vicinity of Charleston, S. C. where he was born on the 17th of March, 1791. He was twice married, and each time to the daughter of a pioneer of the Whitewater Valley. His first wife was Nancy Templeton, daughter of Hon. John Templeton, an account of whose early and useful life is also given elsewhere in this work. Her birth occurred in Laurens District, S. C., February 17, 1793, their marriage was celebrated October 20, 1812, and she died on the 8th of March, 1818, having borne him three children. His second wife, mother of William W., was Mary, daughter of Thomas Cully, who, too, was a man of some prominence in the earlier years of the countyís history, having been one of the first Commissionerís of the county, and who served in that capacity for several years, and who was the Treasurer of the county from 1824 to 1842. She bore him seven children. James Leviston had only received, in school, instructions in the common branches, but, possessed of more than ordinary natural ability, and being of a reading and investigating turn of mind, he soon became an intelligent and well-informed man. He was an excellent mathematician, and learned the art of surveying with Col. Thomas Brown, the first surveyor of the county, and one who did much of the early surveying of Indiana for the Government, and whom Mr. Leviston assisted. Mr. Leviston, on the organization of the county in 1821, was chosen its first Clerk, and as such served until 1828, in which year he represented the county in the State Legislature, and again in 1829, with Hon. Ross Smiley as his colleague, from which period until some time in the decade between 1850 and 1860 he was a number of times returned to that body, and served several times as State Senator. He also served for some years as County Surveyor, and during his long public service was a man of unquestioned integrity. He was a modest and unassuming man and made no pretensions to public speaking and was in no sense an orator. His power was with his pen; he was a forcible writer. He was a great reader, and consequently a well posted man. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church at Liberty, and in politics a Democrat. His death occurred August 29, 1864. Our subject was born in the village of Liberty, but in early years moved with his parents to the farm, where he was reared, and worked until twenty-two years of age. March 17, 1853, he was united in marriage with Elmira, daughter of Jacob Immel; Mr. Immel was a native of the State of Maryland, and Elmira a native of this county, born May 19, 1832. To William W. Leviston and wife have been born Frances H., who died March 17, 1883, Mary F. and W. Percy. Mr. Leviston has passed thus far the greater part of his life on the farm. On the second of April, 1883, he became a partner in the harness, hardware and agricultural implement establishment of Samuel Crist, the oldest store of the kind in Liberty. In politics, Mr. Leviston is a Democrat, and is one of the substantial men of Union County.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 67.


R. J. and William R. Leviston, farmers. These gentlemen are natives of Union County. Their father, Isaac Leviston, of South Carolina, was a son of George Leviston, a native of Ireland, who emigrated to South Carolina previous to the Revolutionary war, married there, and came to Butler County, Ohio, in 1804, and to this county in 1806, and entered the place where John Osborn now lives in Liberty Township. Here Isaac was reared, and married to Miss Mary Retherford, and here he resided the greater part of his life. He followed farming, and was an industrious and successful man. He died December 29, 1881, highly respected and deeply lamented by all who knew him. He saw many hardships, and did much to develop the resources of the country, and build up its interests. At the time of his death, he was the oldest living settler of Union County. His wife preceded him to the better land, she having died in 1876. R. J. Leviston was born in Liberty Township, January 23, 1828. He was reared on the farm, and enjoyed the benefits of a common school education. He has always remained in this county, except a short time when the family lived in Fayette County. He has always followed farming, and owned a fine farm until a short time ago, when he sold out, intending to buy again in this county. January 1, 1873, he was married to Miss Nancy Cullins, who was born in Fayette County, Ind., October 31, 1842. To them were born two children Ė John R. and Mollie M. He has always been a Democrat, and has been a useful and influential citizen, assisting in constructing pikes, and all other necessary improvements. William R. Leviston was born March 25, 1836, in Fayette County, Ind. When a young man, he studied and practiced dentistry for some years, then went to farming, which he has since followed. He married Miss Cynthia E. Pullen March 12, 1861. She was born in this township March 26, 1839. Their children are Joseph A., Addie M. and Gertrude G. He is an industrious worker, and a very valuable citizen to the community. He is a man of intelligence and education, and encourages and assists schools and all enterprises for public benefit.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 67.


Deb Murray