Jacob Newkirk, farmer, P. O. Fairfield, was born in Harmony Township, this county, May 28, 1829. He is one of a family of nine children born to Jacob and Mary (Dickinson) Newkirk, who were well known to the early settlers of Harmony Township, and who were both natives of New Jersey. The father, when a boy, was bound out to Jacob Dubois, and that gentleman came to this county and entered land in Harmony Township, in 1806, young Newkirk accompanying him. Here he was reared to manhood, receiving but a limited education. He was a very industrious and hard-working man, and made for himself and family a comfortable home. One of the first orchards in Harmony Township was put out by him. He obtained sixteen trees at Lebanon, Ohio, which he carried from there on his shoulders and put out on his place. He was a Democrat, but liberal in his views, never aspiring to any political honors. He departed this life in 1870, and was followed by his wife four years later. Our subject received a common school education, and remained at home, assisting upon the farm, until he attained his majority. He was united in marriage with Miss Harriet Mullin October 6, 1859. This lady is a native of Harmony Township, and was born June 4, 1837. They have two daughters, viz.: Rosetta F. and Ida M. Mr. Newkirk owns 150 acres of land, which are nicely improved and well stocked. He is a Democrat, but not a strict party man, voting for men and measures, and not for party. He interests himself in all enterprises that go to build up the county or benefit its citizens. He is a successful farmer and stock grower, and he and family are useful members of society.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 69.


James C. Nickels, farmer, P. O. Dunlapsville, was born in Liberty Township May 8, 1825. His grandfather was William Nickels, of the District of Laurens, N. C., who emigrated with his family to this county in 1806, and settled where Dunlapsville now is, where he entered 320 acres of land. They suffered the usual privations of the pioneers of that early day, living in wagons under a beech tree for three months, while they cleared forty acres and planted it in corn. Here they lived until 1827, when they moved to Vermillion County, Ind. Here the father and mother both died. Mr. N. was a strong anti-slavery man, although a Democrat. One of his six children was William, the father of the subject of this sketch. He married Miss Elizabeth Nickels. He served in the war of 1812, against the Indians. In this, he helped to build the block-house at Connersville, and did many other services. His children were Thomas, Mary, James C., William H. He was an industrious citizen, and amassed considerable property. He and his wife were Presbyterians, and were foremost in all Christian duties. His wife died in 1859, and he followed her to the better land in 1869. Our subject, James C., received a common school education, and has been an industrious farmer all his life, amassing his present handsome property of 218 acres of finely improved land entirely by his own energy and economy. April 12, 1855, he was united in marriage with Miss Margaret J. Abernathy, who was born in this township June 12, 1836. Their children are Mary E. and William W. Mr. Nickels is a Democrat in politics. He and his wife are devout members of the Presbyterian Church, and take an active interest in religious and educational matters. He has proven himself to be a most useful and enterprising citizen.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 69.


Clarence W. Osborne, County Superintendent of Schools, College Corner, Ohio, is a native of Union County, where he was born in 1853. His father, William W. Osborne, was a native of England, and when a child his parents emigrated to Toronto, Canada, where he was reared, educated and taught the carpenterís trade. Soon after reaching his majority, he left home, and after wandering some time, in 1845 located at College Corner, where he resided until a short time before his death, which occurred in 1866, in Randolph County, this State. While living at College Corner, he worked at his trade and taught many terms of school in this and adjoining counties in Ohio. He was a successful teacher, a progressive and useful citizen, and had the respect of all who knew him. His wife, whose maiden name was Huldah H. Tucker, survives him, and resides in College Corner. Clarence W. Osborne was reared upon a farm, and until nineteen years of age received but a common school education. He then attended Miami University some time, after which he entered the National Normal University of Lebanon, Ohio, and graduated from that institution in 1875. He followed farming the year after leaving school, and then began teaching, which he followed some five years. In 1881, he was elected to the office of Superintendent of Schools of Union County, a position he has since filled with much credit to himself and lasting benefit to those for whom he labored. He is a successful teacher, an efficient and popular official, and a well known and highly respected citizen. Politically, Mr. Osborne is a Republican.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 69.


Emmitt B. Pierson, druggist, Liberty, is a native of the village of Liberty, Ind., where his birth occurred January 23, 1850. His parents were David S. and Elizabeth (Cason) Pierson, the former a native of Oxford, Ohio, where he was born March 20, 1825, and the latter of Union County, Ind., born November 3, 1829. The father of David S. (David Pierson) was a native of the State of Pennsylvania, but of German extraction, and in the early history of the West settled in the vicinity of Cincinnati, and subsequently removed to Butler County, Ohio. He served in the war of 1812. The father of Mrs. Pierson, William J. Cason, was a native of North Carolina, and emigrated in an early day to this vicinity, and on the formation of the county of Union became identified with its interests, serving from 1828 to 1841 as Recorder, and from 1841 to 1845 as Sheriff. By trade, David S. was a tailor, and about forty years ago located in Liberty, where he has since resided and been occupied as a merchant tailor, engaged in general merchandising, has served as Sheriff of the county, Postmaster of the village, and held other minor offices. He is now carrying on merchant tailoring, and has an interest in the drug store of his son. His first marriage took place May 2, 1846, and to the union were born Emmitt, Charles E. and Jamie. His wife died August 23, 1877, and he was again married, September 18, 1878, to Alice P. Gordon. Our subject is among the active young business men of Liberty. He was schooled in the public schools of the village, where his youth was passed. He learned the business of photographing, and from 1867 to 1872 he followed that occupation in Marietta, Ohio, Liberty, Rushville, and Lebanon, Ind., and for a time was engaged in traveling for a Cincinnati house in that line of goods. During the winter of 1872-73, he served as a clerk in the Indiana State Senate. He then returned to Liberty and became a clerk in the drug store of A. W. Hayden, with whom he remained until the spring of 1874, when he received the appointment as one of the photographers for the United States Transit of Venus expedition, sent out by the Government to take observations. The expedition left the city of New York in June, 1874, and returned via the ďGolden Gate,Ē landing in California in the fall of 1875, during which period the expedition circumnavigated the globe, making observations at various points in both hemispheres, and traveling a distance of 38,000 miles, visiting South America, Africa, New Zealand, the Feejee Islands, Sandwich Islands, and the South Sea Islands. While traveling through New Zealand, Mr. Pierson was engaged in taking landscape views, of which he has a fine and valuable collection. This was a most rare opportunity given young Pierson, and such extensive traveling is rare. On the 30th of December, 1875, Mr. Pierson was married to Laura A. Snyder, who was born in Union County, Ind., March 24, 1858, a daughter of John G. Snyder, and to them have been born Bessie E. and Alice L. He returned after his extended trip to Liberty; and again entered the drug store of Mr. Hayden, and in 1876 engaged in the same business in Portland, Ind., where he remained until 1881, and then opened his present place of business. In politics, Mr. Pierson is a Republican.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 69.


Smith Railsback, farmer, P. O. Liberty, was born in Wayne County, Ind., August 7, 1843. He is one of a family nine children born to Nathan and Lucina (Hunt) Railsback, who were born, reared and married in Wayne County. Their parents were among the first settlers of that county, and were well and favorably known to the old settlers. Nathan Railsback and his wife always resided in their native county, and followed farming. They were hard-working, intelligent people, and had the respect of all who knew them. Mr. Railsback died December 23, 1863. His wife survives him at an advanced age. Smith was brought up on a farm, receiving such education as the schools of that day afforded. September 25, 1863, he was united in marriage with Miss Sarah E. Cooper, a native of Preble County, Ohio, where she was born January 4, 1844. The fruits of this union are six children Ė Benjamin C., Harry V., Addie L., Bertha, Chester A. and Clifford. In 1865, Mr. Railsback moved to the farm he now owns, in Harrison Township, where he has since resided. He owns 160 acres of land, which are well improved and nicely located. He also owns four acres of land on Linden Hill, Richmond, Ind., and valuable town property in Washington Territory. He is one of the leading Republicans of Union County, a member of the Odd Fellows order, and takes an interest in all enterprises that go to build up the county or benefit his fellow-man. He is a jovial companion, possessing social qualities of a high order, and one of the progressive, practical and useful men of the county.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 69.


Ridenour Family, P. O. College Corner, Ohio. No family in Union County is better known or has been more closely identified with its development and growth in every particular than this one. Samuel Ridenour was born near Hagerstown, Md., in 1791, and in 1806 came with his parents to Hamilton County, Ohio, where the family remained about three years, when they moved to Preble County, settling on Four Mile Creek, where Mr. Ridenour, Sr., erected a saw and grist mill, in connection with which he ran a distillery. He was a hard-working man of most sterling integrity in all the affairs of life. He was well known to the early settlers, and had the respect of all. Many of his descendants are now living in and around College Corner, Ohio. Samuel, a son of the above gentleman, labored faithfully on his fatherís farm and in the mills, assisting in all the hard work attendant upon making a comfortable home in the wilderness. He received such education as the schools of that early day afforded and remained at home until his marriage with Miss Barbara Miller, which occurred in 1821. This lady was a native of Franklin County, W. Va., where she was born in 1803. She died July 19, 1883. Her parents, Tobias and Sarah (Henderson) Miller, were among the earliest settlers of Union County, having come to Union Township in 1809. Soon after his marriage, Samuel Ridenour moved to Union Township and purchased the farm the family now resides upon. Here he passed his entire married life, dying in 1850. In his family were sixteen children Ė Jonathan M., Charles P., Peter, Tobias M., Samuel, Irving M. and Elisha, living Ė David, William H., Elijah, John, Abariah, Sarah A., Martha, Louisa and Adaline, deceased. Three of the sons, Peter, John and Samuel, served their country in the late war. They saw many hardships, and one of them, John, was wounded several times, the last being at Petersburg, Va., where he was severely wounded in the hip, and after remaining on the field uncared for for thirty-six hours, was taken prisoner, and some time after was exchanged. He held a Captainís commission, and was gallantly leading his company in a charge on the rebel works at Petersburg, when he received his last wound. He came home, but soon after died from the effects of his wound and the harsh treatment he had received while a prisoner. Peter was residing in Kansas during the rebellion, and was Colonel of a Kansas regiment of volunteers. Samuel Ridenour was a very active, energetic and thorough business man, and during his lifetime accumulated a comfortable fortune. He dealt largely in live stock, driving to Cincinnati and other points, and few men in that business enjoyed so good a reputation for honesty and integrity. He was a careful and thrifty husbandman, and the characteristics that attended him through life were industry, reliability, a strict regard for truth and a disposition to perform a kind action toward his fellow-creatures as often as they merited it and their necessities came under his notice. He was a Whig and strong anti-slavery man, and in all matters political he was candid and honest, and labored more for the success of the principles he professed, than to secure public honors for himself. He had served in the war of 1812 under Gen. Harrison, and in after life received a commission as Captain of the militia, which he held for a number of years. He was one of the most useful and public spirited of Union Countyís early settlers, and his death was deeply regretted by all. His faithful wife and companion survives him at the advanced age of eighty years, making her home with her children. She is a woman of remarkable intellect and natural powers of mind, and of great goodness of heart. Upon the death of her husband in 1850, she took charge of the farm and large family of children, caring for them and rearing them in a manner that reflects much credit on her executive ability and sound judgment. She has for many years been a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has been actively engaged in promoting and supporting the temperance reform and all other worthy causes. Two of her sons are yet living in Union County, one of whom, Irving M., makes his home with her, and is a single man. He is one of the well-known and well-posted men of the county, and one of its practical farmers and stock-growers. He and his brothers have been prominently connected with the building of the railroads and gravel roads and the growth and development of the county in every way. Irving M. is at present one of the Commissioners of Union County, and has been twice elected to that office, in which capacity he has distinguished himself by the untiring vigil he has kept over the interests of the county, and has earned the reputation of being an active, careful and trustworthy public servant. Tobias M., the other son who resides in Union Township, was born upon the old homestead July 21, 1833, and received but a limited education, as at the time of the fatherís death, he was the eldest of the eight children at that time living, and many of the cares and duties of the father devolved upon him. He remained at home, working on the farm, until 1867, when he embarked in mercantile pursuits at College Corner, having as a partner J. M. C. Howe. They continued in business some fives years, and had quite an extensive trade, dealing in all kinds of grain and produce. In 1872, Mr. Ridenour moved to his farm, where he has since resided, being engaged in farming and stock-raising at which he has been very successful. He owns 160 acres of land which are well improved and nicely located. He was united in marriage with Miss Maria J. Beard May 10, 1870. This lady was born in Center Township, this county, August 19, 1850. By this union there are two children, viz., Louie and Charles M. The Ridenour brothers are stanch Republicans in politics, and since the organization of that party have contributed not a little toward its success. They are men of intelligence, and all who know them speak in the highest praise of them.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 69.


Hanson J. Robinson, farmer. Among the pioneers of Southeastern Indiana we are pleased to mention the name of Mathew Robinson, father of the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. Mr. Robinson was a native of Monongalia County, W. Va., and was a son of John Robinson, a native of England, and who emigrated to the State of Virginia long prior to the Revolutionary war. Of the eight children of John Robinson, Mathew was the second; he, after growing to manhood, was united in marriage with Miss Elenor Haymon, who, too, was born in Monongalia County, W. Va. Mathew Robinson and wife, with several children, emigrated to Indiana in the year 1816, coming down the Ohio River by boat to the city of Cincinnati, and from thence by wagon, via Brookville, to the eastern part of what is now Fayette County, where he entered the green woods, and carved therefrom a home for himself and family, and there passed the remaining years of his life, dying in 1839. He had served his country in the war of 1812-15. His wife survived him some years. Nathan Haymon, the grandfather of Hanson J. Robinson on his motherís side, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, serving through the war, for nearly a period of seven years, and having participated in many of the hard-fought battles of the struggle. Our subject was born in the same county and State in which his father was, on the 30th of July, 1814, and consequently was but two years of age at the time of his parentsí emigration to the West, yet it is a striking fact that he remembers well their halt in the woods on reaching the point of destination. He was reared on his fatherís farm, and received such training in the rudimentary branches as the limited educational facilities of the period afforded. During early boyhood, he received an injury to one __ ___ legs which disabled him to such an extent as to render him unfit to perform farm labor, and so at the age of fifteen he was apprenticed to Mathias Rauck, a boot and shoe maker residing in this county, with whom he remained two years and learned that trade. He then worked for several years in this State and in Ohio for others, and next opened a shop of his own at his fatherís, which he carried on until 1836, during which year he traveled through Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and Tennessee, prospecting in search of a home. On the 25th of September, 1837, Mr. Robinson was married to Eliza J., daughter of John and Jane (Hanna) Norris, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, and became pioneers of this portion of Indiana. Eliza J. was born in the territory now comprising this county May 18, 1818. To Mr. Robinson and wife have been born the following named children: Sarah A., Justinian, John, Louis M. and two who died in infancy. Sarah J. is the wife of Thomas Farlow, a farmer of this county; Justinian married Maria Starr, and both are now dead, but left six children surviving them; John married Syntha Starr, and resides in this county; Louis M. is deceased. For about twelve years after his marriage, our subject followed his trade, working in Fayette County, when, on account of poor health, he quit the business and removed to this county on a farm adjoining the one upon which he now resides, and has since been occupied as a farmer, and, by close application and good management, has been successful, he having possessed at one time upward of 400 acres of land in that county. In politics, he is a Democrat, as was his father before him. He was reared a Methodist, and was a member of that church for a period of twenty-one years. He subsequently united with the church designated as the Christian Union, and of which he is yet a member. His fatherís house was one of the early Methodist preaching places in the days when they were without meeting-houses. Mr. Robinson, though decided in his political and religious opinions, is not bigoted, but liberal to all who are conscientious in their beliefs. He is a friend to public improvements, and believes in keeping pace with the progressive age in which he is living. He has recently erected a modern home, with a large and commodious barn and outbuildings, which beautify that locality of the county and do credit to himself. He is a highly respected citizen, a genial and affable man and a well-to-do farmer.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 69 and 70.


Ezekiel Rose, farmer, P. O. Fairfield, was born in Salem County, N. J., September 11, 1800. His parents, Uriah and Rachel (Dubois) Rose, were both natives of New Jersey, where they were married and lived until the death of the wife, when Mr. Rose married Tamson Garrison, and in 1814 moved with his family to Harmony Township, this county, where they spent the remainder of their days. Ezekiel Rose was reared upon his fatherís farm, receiving but an indifferent education. He was married to Miss Harriet Colson February 5, 1829. She was born in Salem County, N. J., June 12, 1809, and came with her parents to this county in 1814. To Mr. Rose and wife has been born a family of nine children, viz.: Abigal, Ezekiel, Mary, Annias, John, Uriah, James, Theodore and Addarene. Uriah served as a soldier in the late war, and died while in his countryís service. Mr. and Mrs. Rose have passed their entire married life in Harmony Township. They have always worked hard, and have made for themselves a competency. They are members of the Presbyterian Church, and are among the well-known and highly-respected citizens of the county. Mr. Rose has always voted with the Whig and Republican parties, but has never aspired to any political prominence.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 70.


John M. Ross, merchant and stock-dealer, P. O. Liberty. Few men in Union County are better known or more highly respected than the subject of this brief biography. He is a native of Fayette County, Ind., where he was born February 23, 1837. He is the only child born to Samuel and Rebecca (Eyestone) Ross, who were natives of North Carolina and Pennsylvania respectively. The Ross and Eyestone families were among the early settlers of Fayette, they having come to the county in about 1822. Samuel Ross was twice married, his first wife being a lady named Kennedy, who bore him one child. He was a Democrat, Free-Soiler and a strong advocate of the abolition of slavery, and now a Republican. He removed to Montgomery County, and from there, about one year ago, to Boone County, Ind., where he now resides. John M. Ross, until about twenty years of age, assisted at home on the farm. His education was such as the country, in its then undeveloped condition, afforded. Early in life, he began handling and dealing in live stock, manifesting a strong aptitude for the business. During the war of the rebellion, he bought stock in Montgomery and adjoining counties in Indiana. He would sometimes ship by rail, but often he would drive from points in those counties to Cincinnati, the trip consuming many days and being attended with much exposure and labor. He continued to deal in stock almost exclusively until 1867, when he purchased a farm in the southern part of Harrison Township, where he resided until a short time ago, when he purchased a grocery store in Liberty in connection with O. W. Fosdick, and has since made his home at that point, although still owning his farm. While living upon the farm, he did not give up the business he is so well adapted to Ė stock-dealing. Few men in the county have handled as much stock as Mr. Ross, and none who have sustained a better reputation for paying the highest prices and for fair and honorable dealing. His reputation as a citizen and business man is unblemished by a single dishonorable act, and he justly has the respect and confidence of all who know him. He was united in marriage, February 15, 1866, with Miss Mary C. Fosdick. This lady was born in Union County June 22, 1845, and to this union have been born six children, viz.: Clara, Charles, Ethel, Dessie and Daisy (twins) and Lora M. Mr. Ross has never aspired to any political preferment. He is a stanch Republican, and works for the success of his party with an energy that makes evident his political rectitude. He is a friend to the poor and distressed, and few men are as liberal as he in contributing to all laudable public enterprises. His upright conduct and goodness of heart have endeared him to the people of Union County, and no man is more deservedly popular.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 70.


Eli Russel, farmer, P. O. College Corner, Ohio, is a native of Chester County, Penn., where he was born Jan. 11, 1801. His parents, Thomas and Rebecca Russel, were natives of the Keystone State, where they were reared, married and always resided. They had two children, who were, when small, deprived of paternal care by the death of the father. Our subject at an early age was put out to work on farms, and he had little or no opportunity of attending school. He continued to work by the month and otherwise until his marriage with Miss Lyda Jackson, which occurred in 1823. She was born in Bucks County, Penn., September 17, 1804. By this union there are fourteen children, viz., William, Rebecca, George, James, Richard, Hannah, Daniel, John, Lydia, Eli, Thomas, Joseph, Mary and Colwell; Richard was a soldier in the late war, and died while in his countryís service. At the time of Mr. Russelís marriage, he had no property, and for some years worked on a farm, receiving $6 per month for his services. His wife greatly aided him, and after some years they had by their industry and economy saved sufficient means to purchase seventy five acres of land in their native State. This they improved and resided upon until 1854, when they sold out, came to this county and purchased the farm they now own in Union Township. Here they have since resided, and by their upright conduct and kindness of heart have secured the respect and confidence of all who know them. Mr. Russel is a Democrat, and he and wife are consistent members of the Presbyterian Church.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 70.


James W. Scott, farmer, P. O. Fairfield, was born in the township in which he resides June 9, 1842. His father, Samuel Scott, was a native of Kentucky, and the youngest but one of a family of nine children, who, in 1815, came with their widowed mother from that State and settled on the west side of Whitewater River, in Harmony Township, this county. The family were very poor, and it was only by the united exertions of all that they were able to secure the necessaries of life. The mother was a woman of great executive ability, kindness of heart, and succeeded in keeping the family together and rearing them in a creditable manner. One of her sons, Robert by name, was killed in an Indian battle near Vincennes, Ind., in 1813. Samuel Scott was but thirteen years of age when the family came to this county, and his educational advantages were such as the log schoolhouses of that early day afforded. He was married, in 1829, to Miss Rebecca Carric, and to this marriage were born four children. His second wife was Amanda Coe, a native of Virginia. By this union there were eight children, our subject being one of them. Mr. Scott, except a short time in early manhood when he followed carpentering, devoted his life to agricultural pursuits. He was an extremely hard working man, sober, frugal, and scrupulously honest. He was one of the early Abolitionists in Union County, and during the late war was a stanch friend to the Union, and aided greatly in keeping up a strong loyal sentiment at home. He departed this life in 1868; his widow survives him at an advanced age, and resides in Harmony Township. James W. Scott was reared upon a farm, receiving a common school education. In 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Thirty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He left his native county December 10, and December 31 and January 1, following his regiment took part in the battle of Stone River. He remained in the army until the close of the war, undergoing many hardships and seeing much active service. Since his return home, he has followed farming and stock-raising. He owns eighty acres of well-improved land, and is one of the practical farmers of Harmony Township. He was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth H. Wooters October 31, 1867. This lady is a native of Harmony Township, and was born September 20, 1844. The fruits of this union are seven children, viz., Grace, Addie, Georgia, Mary, Ruther, Albert and Henry. Mr. Scott has held township offices and other positions of honor and trust. He is a member of the Masonic order, and in politics a Republican. He is enterprising, public-spirited, and one of the countyís well-informed and useful citizens.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 70.


William B. F. Shanklin, farmer, P. O. Billingsville, Ind. This gentleman is a native of this county, and was born March 23, 1856. He is a son of William and Rebecca (Hammel) Shanklin, who have been residents of this county many years, and are among its most intelligent and respected citizens. Our subject was reared upon his fatherís farm, receiving a good common school education. He was united in marriage with Miss Louisa Brown in 1879. She is a native of Butler County, Ohio, where she was born October 6, 1858. They have one child, named Viola. Mr. Shanklin owns 120 acres of well-improved land, near the village of Billingsville. Although a young man, he is a practical and successful farmer, and believes in progression in all things. He liberally contributes to all laudable enterprises, and has the respect and confidence of all who know him. Politically, he is a Republican.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 70.


James Schultz was born in Franklin County, Ind., on his fatherís farm, March 18, 1826. His parents were John and Maria (Crawford) Shultz, the former a native of Augusta County, Va., born August 4, 1800; he in August, 1822. While yet a single man, he came in company with his brother, Henry, whom he assisted in moving, to Franklin County, this State, but returned to his native State soon thereafter, and again, in 1823, came to Franklin County, and this time remained. Miss Crawford, the lady who subsequently became his wife, was a daughter of William Crawford, who settled in what is now this county in 1806, emigrating from Virginia. The children born to the union of John Shultz and Maria Crawford were James, Cyrus, Sylvester, Henry, Eleanor and Franklin. Mrs. Shultz died in 1837, and subsequently Mr. Shultz was married to Catharine Cox, of Virginia, who bore him five children. All ten of the sons and daughters of this pioneer, saving one which died in infancy, are yet living. Mr. Shultz settled in Bath Township, where he was occupied in tilling the soil during life, which closed August 15, 1881. He supported the Whig and subsequently the Republican party, and took an active part in public affairs, frequently serving as Judge at the elections. In early times, he was Captain of State militia, and both himself and wife were identified with the Presbyterian Church, and led exemplary lives. Our subject was reared to agricultural pursuits, and remained on the farm with his father until of age. On the 17th of December, 1846, he was married to Elvira Heard, who was born in Butler County, Ohio, May 16, 1826, she being the daughter of William and Fannie (Trembly) Heard, both of whom were natives of New Jersey. The children of this union were John R., Johanna and Clara F. Mrs. Shultz died July 30, 1864, and on the 12th of April, 1866, Mr. Shultz was united in marriage with Charlotte Cunningham, a native of Franklin County, Ind., where she was born February 11, 1836. She was the daughter of Arthur and Mary (Goldtrap) Cunningham, natives of Ohio. To the second marriage of Mr. Shultz has been born a daughter Ė Mary Winona. For nearly twenty years after the first marriage of our subject, he resided on a farm in Springfield Township, Franklin County, and remained in that county occupied as a farmer until the spring of 1882, when he removed to the village of College Corner, and has at that place been engaged, since the spring following, as an undertaker, and in the furniture business. Both Mr. and Mrs. Shultz are members of the Presbyterian Church, in which church he has been a Ruling Elder for a quarter of a century. He is one of Union Countyís substantial and useful citizens.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 70.


George A. Sigler, M. D., physician and surgeon, Liberty. Dr. George A. Sigler is a native of the village of Richmond Dale, Ross County, Ohio, and was born February 24, 1846. His father is of German descent, and was born in Ross County, Ohio. He learned the carpenter trade, which he followed at Richmond Dale and in the surrounding country, and later in life was engaged in farming in connection with his trade. He was married, in 1845, in Ross County, Ohio, to Sarah Cunningham, a native of York County, Penn. Her parents settled in Ross County, Ohio, when she was but a girl, so she was there reared. The family left Ross County in 1852, removing to Fayette County, of the same State, and about the year 1858, removed to Miami County, in the State of Indiana, where the father still resides. The mother died in 1858 or 1859. Both were identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject received his primary education in the common schools of his native village and of the counties of Fayette and Miami, Ohio and Indiana, respectively. After attending the high school at Peru, Ind., for a period, he went to the city of Chicago, where he took a commercial course of studies, and graduated in an institution of that city. For several years thereafter he was engaged in teaching school in Miami County, Ind. In 1870, he commenced reading medicine at Peru, Ind., and the same fall went to Connersville, Ind., and entered the office of Dr. J. Chitwood, with whom he continued his studies until the winter of 1871-72, which was passed attending lectures at the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery. The following spring, he settled in the village of Brownsville, this county, and there began the practice of medicine and surgery. Here he remained until the fall of 1874, when he went to the city of New York, and entered, for the further prosecution of his professional studies, Bellevue Hospital Medical College, and remained until the spring of 1875, graduating at this institution. He then returned to Brownsville, where he remained until May, 1882, at which time he opened an office in Liberty, where he continues to practice. On the 6th of April, 1873, Dr. Sigler was united in marriage with Frances C., daughter of William and Phoebe (Little) Stagg, of Brownsville, one of the pioneers of that vicinity. The Doctor is in every sense a self-made man, having schooled and fitted himself for his profession by his own earnings, and fought the battle of young professional men unaided. He is of a reading and investigating turn, and is deeply interested in scientific studies. He has a fine library, and commands a good share of the practice in this vicinity. He was raised a Methodist. In his political views, he is Democratic. He is an Odd Fellow and a Mason.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 70.


William Smith, (deceased), was born in Preble County, Ohio, on the 20th of October, 1812, not far from the present village of Camden. His parents were James and Anna (Smith) Smith (though not related before marriage). The father was a native of Franklin County, Penn., born in September, 1769, and the mother was born March 17, 1770. Their marriage was celebrated in Franklin County some time prior to 1797, and with children they emigrated to the State of Kentucky, and from there, in 1802, to Preble County, Ohio (then a portion of Montgomery County), and for a time thought themselves to be the only white family living in the new county of Preble, immediately after is formation. In 1815, the family removed to the present farm of the widow of William Smith, in Union Township, this county, when but two acres of it were cleared. The land had been entered in 1809 by John Fisher. James and his wife died on this land, the former in 1852, and the latter some nine years previous. Our subject was the youngest of nine children, and was reared on the farm and followed the occupation of farmer all his life. He received such education as the schools of the country afforded, and on growing to manhood was married in May, 1836, to Miss Mary Buck, who bore him two children, John and Anna, the latter is the wife of M. M. Johnson of the vicinity of Liberty, and the former is a Presbyterian minister, now located at Monticello, Ind. During the late war, he served as Chaplain of the Nineteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and on the 10th of March, 1867, was married to Adaline Dewsey. The wife of Mr. Smith died in 1849, and on the 23d of January, 1850, he was married to Miss Lucinda Brown, who was born in Preble County, Ohio, on the 16th of July, 1828, of parents James and Margaret (Colwell) Brown, natives of the district of Newberry S. C., born, the former in 1795,and the latter in 1800, and came with their parents to Fort Hamilton, Ohio, in 1804 and 1805 respectively. They were married in Butler County, Ohio, and subsequently removed to Preble County. The mother died in Butler County, in 1856, and the father in Mercer County, Ill., in 1863. To the union of William Smith and Lucinda Brown were born James B., who died at Bloomington, Ind., April 30, 1874, while attending the State University, and a member of the Senior class. His birth occurred December 1, 1850; and Isaac N., born on the home farm, Union Township, this county, April 4, 1856. He received such schooling as the district schools of the neighborhood afforded, and on the 18th of February, 1880, was united in marriage with Katie Earhart, a daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Search) Earhart. One child, Willie E., was born to them August 26, 1883. The Smiths and Browns were of Scotch-Irish extraction. The Widow Smithís maternal grandfather was a Lieutenant-Major in the Revolutionary war. Our subject at the age of seventeen years became identified with the A. R. Presbyterian Church, known as Hopewell Church, and ever through life remained a consistent member of the same. He read a great deal, and was a well informed man and useful citizen. He gave of his means liberally for charitable and religious purposes, and was one who took an active part in public improvements. He was a stock-holder and was interested in the building of the railroad crossing the county. In the fall of 1860, he was elected a Justice of the Peace of his township, and served continuously as such until 1876, when he resigned the office, much to the regret of his fellow-citizens. In politics, he was a Whig, and later a Republican. His death occurred January 7, 1880. His widow and son Isaac N. and family reside on the farm where he died, which is composed of 270 acres of well-improved land, upon which are excellent buildings.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 70 and 71.


Deb Murray