JOHN W. BURCKHALTER, one of the prominent farmers of Lincoln Township (Pottawattamie County, Iowa), is of an old American family of German descent. ABRAHAM BURCKHALTER, his grandfather, came from South Carolina to Ohio about 1811 and then removed to Union Co., Indiana, then to Boom Co., same state, in 1831. When he first came to Ohio his wife rode a horse and he walked. He was the father of 9 children: Cason, Jeremiah, James S., Joseph, Thomas, Fannie, Rebecca, Sarah, and a daughter whose name is unknown who married and reared a family. ABRAHAM BURCKHALTER lived to the age of 70 years and died in Boone Co., Indiana. He was a prominent farmer of that county and was able to give each of his children 80 acres of land. James S., son of the above and father of our subject, was born in 1818 on a farm in Union Co., Indiana, and was married in Boone Co. to LEAH BELLES, daughter of WILLIAM and MARY (HOFF) BELLES. The father was born in New Jersey and is said to have royal blood in his veins. He was married in that state at an early day, then moved to Cincinnato, Ohio, where he worked at the carpenter's trade. He afterward settled in Boone Co., Indiana. He was the father of 10 children, all of whom lived to years of maturity: Isaac, Elisha, Eliza, Catherine, Jacob, Peter, Ann, Leah and two others. Mr. WILLIAM BELLES died in Boone Co. at the age of 62 years and his wife, nee MARY HOFF, lived to the great age of 104 years, dying in Pottawattamie County, Iowa, in 1888. To Mr. and Mrs. JAMES BURCKHALTER were born 8 children: Daniel A., John W., Thomas W., Abijah C., Eliza J., Cynthia A., Mary F., and Laura A. Mr. BURCKHALTER remained in Boone Co. until 1854 when he came to Marion Co., Iowa, and settled on a farm of 300 acres. At the age of 44 years he enlisted in the War, serving one year, but died on the steamboat on his way home and was buried at St. Louis. His son, Daniel, was also in the War and served three years in Company K, 3d Iowa Cavalry, and was in the battle of Salina, Arkansas; was taken prisoner by the Confederates but soon made his escape. JOHN W. BURCKHALTER, our subject, was born Sept 23, 1845, and at the age of 9 years came with his father to Marion Co., Iowa, where he has grown to manhood. In 1873 he came to Lincoln Township, where he remained one year, and next removed to Cass Co. where he resided one year, returning to Marion County where he resided four years. In 1879 he returned to Lincoln Township and settled on his present farm, then consisting of 80 acres of wil land but to which he has since added until he now owns 240 acres of improved land. He was married in Marion Co., Iowa, Feb 25, 1872, by Rev. C.M. Bingham, pastor of the Congregational Church of Otley, Marion Co., Iowa, to SABINAH ROBERTS, daughter of SIMON S. and NANCY (DONNELL) ROBERTS. SIMON S. ROBERTS was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Oct 9, 1808; taken when ten years of age by his parents to Ohio; at 21 learned the trade of carpenter and millwright and moved to Indiana, thence to Missouri where he was building water mills for 10 years. Then he returned to Ohio and was married to Miss ELIZABETH CONRAD in 1844; and they were the parents of three children: James P., George and Charles. They removed to Iowa in 1846. He was then married to NANCY M. DONNELL, daughter of JOHN C. and NANCY (McROBERTS) DONNELL, Sept 22, 1850, and they had children: Orin, Sabinah, Eva, Ethel, Millie, Mary E., Sarah, Elsie, Edwin and Maggie. NANCY M. DONNELL was born in Seneca Co., Ohio, Feb 12, 1828, came with her parents to Marion Co., Iowa in 1848 and married Mr. Roberts. The grandparents of NANCY M. DONNELL on her mother's side were McROBERTS. Her grandfather, of Scotch descent, was a Revolutionary soldier, was at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis and saw the British stack their arms. Mrs. McRoberts, nee NANCY HYLAND, was born in Virginia in 1757. Grandfather JOHN DONNELL married MARY BOYD, died in Pennsylvania and his widow moved to Ohio with her son, John C., when he was 12 years of age. Born in the Keystone State in 1801, he was married August 4, 1825, to NANCY McROBERTS and they had 8 children. In 1848 they moved to Iowa, where they resided until their death, his taking place Dec 14, 1887 and hers Feb 24, 1888. MR. and MRS. JOHN W. BURCKHALTER are the parents of 7 children: Thomas W., Simon R., James H., Mary E., Bertha E., George C., and infant Eva Irene.

From: 1891 Biographical History of Pottawattamie County, Iowa


RUFUS E. GARDNER, a resident of section 26, Jackson Township, is one of the pioneers of Clarke County, and was born in Union County, Indiana, September 16, 1849. His father, Asa F. Gardner, was a native of Indiana. His mother, Amy (Barnard) Gardner, was born in North Carolina, and at the age of nine years went to Wayne County, Indiana, where she was reared.Mr. and Mrs. Asa F. Gardner, with their six children came to Clarke County in 1855. They lived in Osceola township three years, improving a farm there. In 1858 they removed to Franklin township, where they improved a small farm, which they occupied until the death of Asa F., which occurred August 11, 1883. He was sixty-seven years of age, and was reared a Quaker. His widow survives and resides with her youngest son in Franklin Township. The following are the names of the children-- Sophronia, who died in infancy; Charles C., died in Franklin Township, aged nineteen years; Erastus R., a resident of Wichita, Kansas; Andalusia, died at the age of fifteen; Rufus, the subject of this sketch; Alphonzo, a resident of Franklin township; Mary, died at the age of nine years; Albert L., died at the age of six years; and Harrison L., who died at the age of twenty-one months.Rufus E., the subject of this sketch, was reared on his father’s farm and educated in the district schools. He also attended the academy at Garden Grove. At the age of nineteen he commenced teaching school, and followed that vocation successfully fourteen years, and nearly all the time in Clarke County.November 11, 1880, Mr. Gardner was married to Mrs. Abbylene Mills, daughter of Isaac and Charity Bidwell. Her parents were among the early settlers of Mahaska County, Iowa. She was born in the State of Illinois, April 15, 1840, but has resided in Iowa since three years of age. May 17, 1857, she was married to Runa Marvin, and in August, of that year, came to Clarke County and settled on section 35. Mr. Marvin was born in Fountain County, Indiana, October 2, 1833. He enlisted in Company D, Thirty-ninth Iowa Volunteers, in August, 1862, and died at Corinth, Mississippi, March 4, 1863, aged thirty years. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin had three children-- Elizabeth N., who died at the age of five years; Mary C., now wife of C. D. Ury; and Charlotte L., who died at the age of nine months. The second marriage of Mrs. Gardner was with Thomas C. Mills, March 11, 1866. He was born in Morgan county, Ohio, September 1, 1835, and died January 28, 1876, leaving two daughters, Cora and Florence A. One child, Hettie, died at the age of five years.The home of Mr. and Mrs. Gardner is on section 26, of Jackson township. Mr. Gardner has 1764-20 acres (editor’s note- this is the acreage as listed in the history book), located on sections 26, 27 and 35. Both are members of the Christian church. In politics Mr. Gardner is a Republican, and has served as secretary of the School board three years.

Submitted by: Lora
Clarke County Historical and Biographical Record by Lewis Publishing, 1886. p.115



James N. Ardery, farmer, P. O. Billingsville, was born in Franklin County, Ind., April 23, 1825. His parents, James and Mary (Watson) Ardery, were born, reared and married in Harrison County, Ky. In 1817, they came to Franklin County, Ind., and located in Springfield Township. They ever after resided there, and to them was born a family of eight children, four of whom are now living. They were industrious, intelligent people, and had the respect of all who knew them. James Ardery was brought up to hard work, and received such education as the log schoolhouse of that early day afforded. Soon after reaching his majority, he began for himself by working by the month upon a farm, taking contracts for clearing land, or anything he could honorably make a penny at. He carefully saved his money, and after a few years purchased a tract of land in Shelby County, Ind. He kept dealing in real estate in different portions of the State for some time, but continued to reside in Union County. He also dealt in live stock during this time, and in all his undertakings was quite successful. He was united in marriage with Miss Margaret Goff October 3, 1850. This lady was born in Bath Township, Franklin Co., Ind., July 15, 1834. By this union there were ten children John, Leander, James, Albert, Dora, Ellsworth, Mary, Laura, Franklin and Omar. In 1864, Mr. Ardery purchased his present farm and has since added to it until he owns 258 acres. He has made what he now possesses by close attention to business and by economy, and is a practical and successful farmer and stockraiser. He is a Republican, and a useful and progressive citizen.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 60.


Bake Family, Contreras, Ohio. This family of Bakes are descended from one Christian Bake, who emigrated from Switzerland to America in 1727, and located in New Jersey, where he reared a large family. Jacob Bake, a grandson, was born in New Jersey, and removed thence to Northumberland County, Penn., and from there to the western part of Ohio in the fall of 1805. Here his family remained over winter, while he made some improvements on a tract of land he had entered on Indian Creek, in what is now Union Township, Union Co., Ind. In the spring of 1806, he moved his family to his possessions, and there passed the remainder of his life, drying October 3, 1849. Soon after coming to Union County, he erected an oil and grist mill on Indian Creek, which, if not the first, was one of the first mills in the county, and for many years was patronized by the early settlers of Union and Franklin Counties, Ind., and Butler County, Ohio. Jacob Bake was one of the few men who served in the war of 1812 from Union County, and was well and favorably known to the first settlers. William Bake, a son of the above gentleman, was born in Northumberland County, Penn., October 5, 1797. He received but a limited education, and from early boyhood was accustomed to hard work. He was united in marriage with Miss Mary Thurston October 19, 1820. This lady was born in Northumberland County, Penn., January 22, 1805, and is a daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Kelly) Thurston, who removed from Northumberland County, Penn., to Franklin County, Ind., in 1819, where, a few years later, Mr. Thurston was killed by a falling tree. In William Bakes family were fourteen children, viz., Elizabeth, John, Samuel, Perry, Jacob, Henry, Clarissa, Andrew J., Julia A., Catharine, Jeremiah, Sarah A., James P. and Phebe J. William Bake had little or no means at the time of his marriage, and for some time worked for his father at milling and distilling. He at last purchased thirty-five acres of land near the Ohio State line in Indiana, and in connection with farming started a distillery. This he successfully conducted some time, when, from purely moral motives, he quit the distilling business, and from that time on became a sincere and practical temperance man, and was the first in the vicinity to do away with and discourage the use of whisky at raisings and in the harvest field. He was a man of great goodness of heart, and by his industry and economy amassed a comfortable fortune. He took an active part in political matters voting with the Democratic party until some years before his death, when he cast his ballot for the Whig and Free-Soil candidates. He took an active part in the building-up of the schools and industries of Union County, and liberally contributed to all laudable and useful enterprises. He and wife were members of the Universalist Church, and were highly respected by all who knew them. He died January 15, 1852. His widow survives him at the advanced age of seventy-eight years. Of their fourteen children, ten are yet living, and all reside within a radius of eight miles of the old homestead in Union County. They are all married, and are people of the highest respectability. Of these children, John, who resides in Contreras, was born October 4, 1823, on the old homestead in Union Township. He received a common school education, and remained at home assisting upon the farm until 1850, when he, in company with others, went overland to the then newly discovered gold fields of California. They encountered many dangers and went through many hardships, arriving at the end of several months in the new El Dorado. While on the Pacific Slope, Mr. Bake followed mining and gardening, being quite successful at both. In 1853, he returned home, and soon after, in connection with Ezra Bourne, embarked in mercantile business at Contreras. After a few years, Mr. Bourne sold out, and Mr. Bake successfully carried on the business until 1879, when he sold out, and has not since been engaged. He was united in marriage with Miss Mary Miller January 22, 1857. This lady was born in Franklin County, Ind., July 6, 1839. Mrs. Bake died February 9, 1868. Mr. Bakes owns a large and well-improved farm, and is one of the prominent and useful men of the county. Samuel Bake, like his brother, received a common school education, and his youth and early manhood were passed assisting upon the farm. While yet young, he began dealing in live stock, and as time went on he engaged in it more extensively, and with singular and uniform success. This has been owing greatly to his good judgment and careful and systematic way of conducting business. His farm of 136 acres is nicely improved and well stocked, and it can truly be said of him that he is one of the most thorough, practical and successful farmers and stock shippers in Union County. He was united in marriage with Miss Harriet Nutt, January 24, 1850. She is a native of Montgomery County, Ohio, and was born in 1825, and Mr. Bake in Union County, Ind., March 13, 1825. The Bake brothers have almost uniformly voted in opposition to the Democratic party, and many of them have held positions of honor and trust. They are reading, intelligent men, and favor all enterprises the go to build up the country or benefit their fellow-men, and are among the most influential and useful of Union Countys citizens.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 60 and 61.


Samuel H. Ballinger, merchant and farmer, P. O. Liberty. This gentleman is a native of the county in which he resides, and was born April 16, 1845. His paternal ancestors moved from France to England during the latter part of the seventeenth century, on account of religious persecution. In 1703, three brothers of that name emigrated to America and settled in New Jersey, where they resided many years, some of their descendants serving in the American Army during the Revolutionary war. Samuel Ballinger, grandfather of our subject, moved with his family to Logan County, Ohio, in 1804, where he ever after resided, raising a large family. Isaac, one of these children, was born in Logan County in 1820, and remained in that county until he attained his majority, when he came to Union County, Ind. He began working by the month, carefully saving his money, and after some time purchased a threshing machine, and for a number of years following threshing. By careful management and economy, he acquired considerable property, at one time owning over 400 acres of land. He was united in marriage with Miss Orinda Bennett August 15, 1844. She was born in Union County, Ind., July 22, 1827. By this union there were nine children, viz.: Samuel H., Amanda E., Thomas C., Albert A., William B., Ina L., Dora E., John F. and Mary I. Mr. Ballinger and wife have resided in Liberty since 1877. They are members of the Christian Church, and have the respect and confidence of all who know them. Samuel H., the subject of this brief sketch, was reared upon his fathers farm, receiving a good education. He was united in marriage with Miss Lucy Sullivan January 27, 1867. This lady was born in Union County, Ind., in 1845. Three children are the fruits of this union, viz.: Ora, Robert L. and Mattie M. For one year after his marriage, Mr. Ballinger following farming, and then embarked in the mercantile pursuits in Liberty, in which he continued some nine years. He conducted this business with great success, and has done a large trade. After retiring from mercantile business, he purchased 240 acres of land in Harrison Township, which is to-day one of the best improved and most productive farms in Union County. He has lately embarked in the dry goods trade in Liberty, and is doing a large and rapidly increasing business. His success in all his ventures has been due, mainly, to his honesty and upright dealings and close attention to business. He is a Republican, a member of the Masonic order, and one of the countys leading and useful citizens.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 61.


John Beard, farmer, is a son of William and Rachel (Pearson) Beard, natives of the State of North Carolina. William Beard was born in Guilford County on the 6th of December, 1787, and in early years learned the potters trade. He was married in his native State, and in the year 1816, with his family, emigrated to what is now Union County, Ind., entering land in Center Township, in which township he passed the remainder of his life. His death occurred October 6, 1873, at the ripe age of eighty six years of well-spent time. He was ever the poor mans friend, and always lent his sympathy to the oppressed. He early imbibed a hatred for the institution of slavery, and as early enlisted in the anti-slavery cause, in which he stood firm and unflinching amid the trials and dangers of the position he had taken, believing that right would ultimately triumph over wrong. With an unwavering confidence in God, he believed His unseen hand would protect him in the right. The fleeing fugitives always found a shelter beneath his roof, where raiment and food were freely given. He, on various occasions, protected and assisted fleeing fugitives, and had so deeply at heart their cause, that much time and considerable money were given by this good man for the education and elevation of the colored race. He was twice chosen as agent to solicit aid for this class in Darke County, Ohio, traveling through the Eastern States for this purpose; was twice selected as agent to go to Canada to distribute clothing among the destitute fugitives, who had reached freedoms soil, making the trip through on horseback, and there met with many he had seen and assisted on their journeys there. Mr. Beard sought Christ in early life, and engaged in His service as a minister of the Gospel, in the Society of Friends, to which he belonged more than a half century, during which time he had no recollection of having disappointed more than one congregation. He also, for a period, practiced medicine, and for a time, after his emigration to Indiana, followed his trade, and subsequently farming. In politics, he was a Whig, and later a Republican. His wife died April 6, 1856. Their children were, Mary, Elizabeth, John, Abical, Sarah, Thomas, Phoebe, Lida, Elihu, William, Hannah and George. Our subject, the third child, was born in Guilford County, N. C., October 15, 1813. He was reared on his fathers farm, with whom he remained until he reached his majority, when he commenced life for himself, following farming, beginning on the farm upon which he now resides, north of Lotus. On the 26th of May, 1836, Mr. Beard was united in marriage with Catharine Dubois, a native of what subsequently became Union County, Ind., born November 12, 1818. To this union were born Delphina, Alexander Oscar, one not named, who died in infancy, Willington, Allen, Alonzo, John (died May 20, 1870) and Elihu. Mr. Beard has followed farming all his life and for a period, in connection with this occupation, he dealt largely in stock, and between the two he has been very successful, having, through his shrewdness, industry and economy, accumulated a large body of land of considerable value, and upon which his children are now comfortably situated, he remaining on the home farm. From December, 1861, to December, 1870, our subject served as County Commissioner with credit to the county and honor to himself. He had instilled in him the principles of his father, and espoused the cause of the down-trodden race, and the principles of the Whig and Republican parties, in defense of which his influence has ever been cast. He at one time assisted, with his father, in the escape of some fugitives, who had permission to attend a quilting at a point opposite the city of Cincinnati. It had been previously planned that they were to be met at Cincinnati by the Beards, and conveyed to a place of safety until they could make good their escape. John Beard met them at Cincinnati with a team, from whence he conveyed them to the house of Joel Haworth, in Union County, during the first night, and on the night following to the house of Levi Coffin, in Wayne County, from which place they were sent to Canada. This circumstance occurred about the year 1840, and the number of fugitives was nine. Mr. Beard is now a minister in the Society of Friends, and using his faculties to the up-building and promotion of her spiritual interests.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 61.


William R. Beck, farmer, P. O. Dunlapsville. Abner and his wife, Martha (Preston) Beck, the parents of this gentleman, are both natives of Union County, and their parents were among its first settlers. John Beck, father of Abner, came with his father, Solomon Beck, from North Carolina to this county, and located in Brownsville Township in 1812, which they ever afterward made their home. Abner Beck has always resided in this county, where he is well and favorably known. In his family were ten children. He is a man noted for his honesty, and has done much to improve and develop Union County. William R. Beck was born in Brownsville Township, this county, March 7, 1844. He received but a common school education, and remained at home, assisting his father upon the farm, until his marriage with Miss Amanda Cunningham, which occurred November 14, 1864. This lady was born in Brownsville Township, this county, March 27, 1844. By this union there have been five children, viz.: Robert L., Cora D., William C. and Charles R., living, and Walter, deceased. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Beck purchased the farm he now owns, going deeply in debt to do so. He and wife, however, went to work with a will, and by economy and perseverance have paid for it, and are, and well may be, proud of their success. They own 222 acres, which are well improved and nicely located. For some time past, Mr. Beck has paid considerable attention to the raising of short-horn cattle, and now has a number of thoroughbred and high grade specimens of that valuable breed upon his farm. He also raises good horses, sheep and hogs, and is one of the most practical and successful farmers in Union County. He is a Democrat, but liberal in views, voting for men and measures and not for party. He liberally contributes to all laudable enterprises, and is one of the countys useful and substantial citizens.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 61.


Alexander P. Bell, farmer, P. O. Brownsville, was born in Butler County, Ohio, June 26, 1821. He is a son of William and Margaret (Briggs) Bell, natives of Pennsylvania who moved to Butler County, Ohio, in 1810, where they afterward resided. They were upright and exemplary people. From this union ten children were born. Being raised on a farm, Alexander obtained a common school education, and then attended Oxford University two years. He then commenced farming, in which business he has been engaged ever since. On November 19, 1839, he married Nancy Wilson. She was born in the Keystone State November 19, 1820. To them were born six children, viz.: William H., Mary J., Cyrus W., Clinton M., Anna M. and Harry E. Mr. Bell lived in Butler County, Ohio, until 1871, when he moved to where he now lives. He owns 170 acres of land. He began life for himself at fourteen years of age, just after his fathers death; he rented the home place, and has worked his own way from boyhood; he is, in the highest sense, a self-made man; he has given his children a good education, and takes a deep interest in schools and all laudable enterprises. Before the war, he was a democrat, but has since been a Republican. He is a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, and an honored member of the I. O. O. F. and P. of H.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 61.


John M. Bell, farmer, P. O. Billingsville. This gentleman was born in Juniata County, Penn., February 21, 1823; his parents, John and Mary (Berry) Bell, were natives of the Keystone State, the former of Philadelphia, and the latter of Juniata County. Both the maternal and paternal grandfathers of our subject were natives of the north of Ireland, but when young men, and previous to the Revolutionary war, came to America and during that long and bitter struggle for independence served in the colonial army with great distinction. After the war, they took up their residence in Pennsylvania, and there reared large families. They were noted for their piety, frugality and many virtues. John Berry and wife always made their home in Juniata County, engaged in agricultural pursuits. To them were born a family of five sons and one daughter. Mr. Bell died in 1837. His wife survived him many years, and died at the residence of her son James, in Clinton County, Ind. Our subject was reared upon his fathers farm, receiving such education as the schools of that day afforded. When about sixteen years of age, he left home, and after wandering some time, he stopped at Oxford, Ohio, where he served an apprenticeship at the carpenters trade. By the death of his father, he came into possession, on reaching his majority, of 160 acres of unimproved land, on which he now resides. After learning his trade, he often visited his possessions in Union County, and from time to time made some improvements on them. In 1848, he quit his trade and moved on to his farm in Union Township, where he has since resided; he was united in marriage with Miss Mary J. Luse September 5, 1848. This lady was born in the town of Milton, Ind., April 29, 1834. By this union there were six children Melinda J., William H., James A., John O., Joseph E. and Albert F. On coming into possession of the land left him by his father, he found it wholly unimproved, but by hard work and good management he has nicely improved and added to it, until he now owns 210 acres. He has lately built one of the most commodious and nicely arranged residences to be found in Union County. He is a Democrat of conservative views, usually voting for men and measures, and not for party. He has given his children liberal educations, and takes an active and leading part in forwarding any measure tending to build up the county or benefit his fellow-man.

Submitted by: Jeanie
Atlas of Union County Indiana.
J. H. Beers & Co. Chicago. 1884.
Page 61.


B.F. DUNGAN, farmer, Waterloo Township, was born December 24, l836, in the township in which he now resides, and the district schools afforded him the only means for an education. He was married May 28, l865, to ELIZABETH, daughter of RICHARD and SUSANNA STRONG, who has borne him two children: MARY M. and WILLIAM A. He owns eighty acres of land, which are finely improved. MR. DUNGAN has served three terms as Trustee of the township, and Assessor six years. Politically he is a Democrat. BENJAMIN DUNGAN, grandfather of our subject, was a native of Virginia. He was married to MARGARET MITCHELL, and in l8l4 removed with his family to Waterloo Township, where he entered l60 acres of land in Section 10. Although not a professor of religion, he adhered to the Presbyterian belief. He was the father of ten children, five of whom are living: JAMES, JOHN W., JOSEPH A., ISAAC J., and ELIZABETH. The deceased are: ELIAS, REBECCA, HETTIE, BENJAMIN W. and CHARLES. After a residence here of many years, he and his wife removed to Delaware County, Ind., where they died. ISAAC, brother of BENJAMIN, came to the township some years after, receiving from his brother ten acres of land as an inducement to settle here. WILLIAM M., son of BENJAMIN and father of our subject, was born September 8, l8l4. He was married March 2, l836, in Fayette County, to RACHEL, daughter of ENOCH and MARGARET CHAMBERS, and born in Waterloo Township, August 11, l8l5. He lived in the township till his death, which occurred February 11, l838; he left one child -- B.F... ENOCH CHAMBERS, father of MRS. RACHEL DUNGAN, was born in Maryland, June 28, l778, a son of REV. JAMES and NANCY (TRACY) CHAMBERS. He was reared in his native State, after which he removed to North Carolina, where he was married to MARGARET BROWN. Subsequently they settled in Kentucky, from which State they removed to Wayne County, Ind., and in l8l2 settled permanently in Waterloo Township, Section 33, where he died. He held several of the township offices and was an efficient business man. He was not a member of any denomination, yet was religiously inclined, and gave freely toward the support of the church. He served a short time in the war of l8l2-14. His wife was a member of the Baptist Church and a consistent Christian. Nine children were born to them, four of whom are now living: MARTHA, RACHEL, LYDIA and REBECCA. The deceased are LINNIE, JAMES, JESSE, NANCY, and WILLIAM F... MR. CHAMBERS died June 8, l850; his widow, who was born January l7, l779, died May 3, l856.

Submitted by: Nancee(McMurtrey)Seifert
The History of Fayette County, Indiana - l885



Deb Murray