FRED M. BARNHART
Numbered among the well known and influential citizens and progressive agriculturists of Wabash county, Fred M. Barnhart is an excellent example of the benefit to be acquired by a life of industry and integrity when directed along well defined lines of endeavor. Few local citizens have been the architects of their own fortune in a greater degree, none have been more deserving of success. While speaking of his individual work, it should not be forgotten that he has had a loyal and effective partner for many years, and Mr. Barnhart credits much of his prosperity to his wife. Both represent old and prominent families in Wabash county, and have cooperated both for the establishment of home and for the upbuilding of their material prosperity. Their home place comprises two hundred sixty-five acres, divided into five tracts, in Paw Paw and Pleasant townships. The home farm proper is of forty-five acres, lying on the west side of the Barnhart Pike near the Pleasant township line. Just across the road are two farms, each of eighty acres, and besides these are three pieces of land in Pleasant township, respectively thirty-seven, thirty and sixteen acres.

F. M. Barnhart was born in the city of Wabash, at the corner of Main and Comstock streets, August 24, 1868. He is a son of the late James H. and Martha A. (Mount) Barnhart. James Harvey Barnhart, who died on the old Mount farm in Paw Paw township June 21, 1913, aged nearly sixty-nine years, was born at the forks of the Wabash river in Huntington county July 11, 1844. At the age of twenty, on November 2, 1864, he enlisted at Indianapolis in Company I of the Forty-Sixth Indiana Infantry, and after a service of nearly a year was discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, September 4, 1865. Soon after the war, on June 12, 1866, he married Martha Ann Mount. She was born in Wabash county in 1847, and died November 18, 1909. Her parents were Peter and Eliza Ellen Mount. Peter Mount was born in New Jersey April 28, 1810, was married in Miami county, Indiana, to Eliza Ellen Kidd, a sister of Major Kidd and a daughter of Edmond J. and Christina Kidd. Eliza E. Kidd was born October 23, 1824, at Connersville, Indiana. After his marriage Peter Mount moved to the farm now occupied by Elliott Smith, in Paw Paw township. His father, David Mount, had acquired that place direct from the government as one of the pioneers of Wabash county, and it subsequently became the property of Peter Mount, and has always remained in the family possession, Mrs. Elliott Smith being one of his direct descendants. Peter Mount acquired several hundred acres, and cleared up a large part of the forest growth which originally encumbered the soil, erected log buildings, and died there in April, 1849. His widow subsequently returned to the Kidd farm in Miami county, married Adam Haas, and after his death Arch Kennedy, and she spent the rest of her days in Wabash county. After the marriage of James H. Barnhart and wife in 1866, they lived for a time in Peru, and he was employed in the Blue Front drug store there until 1867. Then moving to Wabash he engaged in the drug business with Mr. Haas, and the firm of Barnhart & Haas continued until 1872, when it was dissolved and T. L. Barnhart became proprietor. The store was located on Canal street in Wabash. James H. Barnhart then moved to the old Mount farm, and both he and his wife died at that place. For nearly forty years the late Mr. Barnhart had been a member of the Methodist church, and also affiliated with the Roann Grand Army Post. The thirteen children of the Barnhart family were: Edith, Mrs. Elliott Smith; Fred M.; Guy S.; Charles K.; James H., deceased; Nellie May, Mrs. O. D. Steele; Robert M., deceased; Homer and Horace, twins, both of whom are deceased; Hugh W.; Howard J.; Ruth Lillian, Mrs. L. R. Burns; and Jessie, who died in infancy.

It was while his father was in the drug business that Fred M. Barnhart was born. During his early childhood the family moved out to the old Mount farm in Paw Paw township, and while there he attended the district school in Pleasant township, and lived at home and helped in the duties of the clearing, planting and harvesting until his marriage. On September 8, 1889, Mr. Barnhart married Rose N. Day, daughter of George W. and Nancy (Hoover) Day. Both her parents are now living at Laketon in this county, and were both natives of Wabash county, the Hoovers coming from Ohio and the Days from Pennsylvania. Mrs. Barnhart is the oldest of three children, the two others being: Frank, of Pleasant township; and Orrill M.

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart began as renters, on the east part of the old Barnhart farm. Then in the spring of the year he bought the forty-five acres which is the nucleus of his present estate, from Amos Ivans, and moved to the land in August of the same year. During the next five years Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart worked hard and in order to get as much capital as possible lived in the old house which stood on the farm when they bought it. They then rented four hundred acres from his grandmother Kennedy's farm, a mile south, and lived there for six years. In the last year Mr. Barnhart remodeled his own buildings, and then returned to his own farm. The other land above mentioned has been bought from time to time as his means justified it, and his estate is now one of the best improved in this section of the county. With his son Howe he carries on general farming, and besides his agricultural interests has stock in the bank at Laketon. Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart have three children: Howe; Lola; and Eugene. Mr. Barnhart in politics is a progressive republican.

Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart after their marriage had only six dollars in cash, besides two horses, and what they have since acquired is due to their own enterprise and good management. Long after he had succeeded independently Mr. Barnhart received his interest from his father's estate, but that was only a small factor in his prosperity. It was the special ambition of Mrs. Barnhart that they should have a home of their own, and soon after their marriage she prevailed upon her husband to go in debt for their first forty-five acres. That was a little farm which had long been used and drained of most of its resources, and they found it almost impossible to make a living, and in consequence rented land elsewhere until the forty-five acres could be restored to a productive condition. While living on the Kennedy farm Mr. Barnhart paid off several thousand dollars in rent, and at the same time was working to get his own land in shape both as to soil and building equipment. In spite of the early hardships and vicissitudes of their career Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart have given their children good education, and the oldest son is a graduate of the class of 1911 at the Roann high school. The daughter is now a student in the class of 1916 in the same school while the youngest is still in the grade school.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



CHESTER A. KING
The home of Chester A. King and wife is the old Eby farm, three and a half miles northeast of Roann in Paw Paw township. The King and Eby families have lived in this section of Indiana since early days, and much of the pioneer work in subduing the wilderness can be credited to them. On both sides it is good, substantial family stock, and it is a heritage as well as a product of their individual effort that Mr. and Mrs. King find themselves so comfortably situated in life.

Chester A. King was born in Huntington county, Indiana, just over the Wabash county line, on September 15, 1858, a son of George and Mary Ann (Loy) King. Both his parents were born and reared in Ohio, were married in that state, and soon afterwards moved to Huntington county, and subsequently established a home in Chester township of Wabash county. During the war George King was one of the number of young men who enlisted for service at the little old church formerly situated three miles northeast of Manchester, known as the Lower Union church. Benjamin Tillman, Rev. David Hidy and George King all went out together to the war from that church, and their wives and families lived together while the men were fighting for the Union. The three subsequently returned, and the families took up once more their individual mode of living. On his return from the war George King became head sawyer in a saw mill, and being an expert in that line was employed in saw milling all over this part of the state. His death occurred at the home of his son William in Kosciusko county, Indiana, June 18, 1902, at the age of sixty years and six months. His widow is now living in North Manchester with her son Charles.

It was along the dividing line of Huntington and Wabash counties, sometimes on one side and sometimes on the other, that Chester A. King grew to manhood, and the schools he attended were also in both counties. Like his father, at an early age, he took up saw mill work, did threshing, farming, and throughout his career has been one of the useful and dependable workers in his community.

On August 15, 1899, Mr. King married Anna Sampson, widow of W. M. Sampson and daughter of Christian and Sarah A. Eby. Christian Eby came out to Wabash county from Ohio with his parents, John Eby and wife, and was married in Indiana. His wife's father, Samuel Eby, settled in Kosciusko county, while John Eby was a settler of Wabash. Christian Eby was one of the substantial farmers of his section, but in 1849, followed the exodus to the west, and spent some time in California hunting for gold and also working as a cook, but without conspicuous success. He returned to Indiana, resumed farming, and in that way laid the basis of his substantial prosperity. After his marriage he bought a farm a mile and a half north of Liberty Mills, obtaining one hundred and sixty acres in that location, cleared up some of the land, and after selling it bought another place in Paw Paw township. A log cabin stood on both the latter lands, and he subsequently erected the more comfortable residence, where his daughter Mrs. King, now lives, Mr. and Mrs. King occupying one hundred and twenty acres which were originally a part of the Eby farm. Mr. Eby died on that place and his widow is now living in Logansport. Their five children were: Anna, Mrs. Chester King; Frank; Charles, who died in infancy; Samuel; and Daisy, wife of Ed Hall of Rochester, Indiana.

After their marriage Mr. King and wife settled on the place they now occupy. George E. Carr, a son of Mrs. King, lives in Chicago, and has one child, Mary Jane Carr, aged eight months. Mr. King is a stanch republican in politics.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



JAMES MADISON COGGESHALL
The deserved reward of a useful and helpful life is an honorable retirement from labor and a season of rest in which to enjoy the fruits of former toil. Consecutive endeavor, unfaltering energy and resolute purpose, well directed, bring success in the activČities of life, and when prosperity is attained these should be followed by a period of leisure, when one may enjoy his individual desires and find satisfaction in pursuing plans from which former duties had withheld him. For a long period James Madison Coggeshall, now living retired at his pleasant home at Somerset, was prominently identified with the agricultural interests of Wabash county as a farmer of Waltz township. His career was an honorable one, in which his straightforward dealing and indefatigable labor brought him a handsome competence that now enables him to put aside the heavier burdens and find pleasurable recreation in his home and among his friends. Mr. Coggeshall was born in Waltz township March 26, 1847, and is a son of Louis and Phoebe (Weesner) Coggeshall.

Louis Coggeshall was a son of Job Coggeshall, while Phoebe Weesner was a daughter of Micajah Weesner. During the early forties, not long after their marriage, they came to Wabash county, and here entered a tract of sixty acres from the Government, on which the father erected a small log cabin. This first tract was traded some time afterward, and in 1861 the family went to Illinois. There were six children in the family: Elizabeth, who died in infancy near Paris, Illinois; James Madison; Minerva, who died when between three and four years of age; Martha J., who married William Withers; Joseph, and Marshall, and all were born in Wabash county, with the exception of the first named, who was born near Paris, Illinois, where the father and mother lived for a time when first married. A year or so later they returned to Wayne county, Indiana, and a little later entered land in Wabash county. Again, in the fall of 1861 they moved back to Illinois, where the mother died in 1863. The father later moved to Colorado and died there.

James M. Coggeshall grew up amid pioneer surroundings. He was rocked to sleep as a baby in a sugar trough, and his early education was secured in the primitive schools. Game was to be found in plenty in the woods, and when the family larder became empty the father or one of the boys would step out of the door and soon bring back enough meat to keep the family supplied. Indians were also numerous, one of them being Peter Bundy, an educated red man, who was later assessed by Mr. Coggeshall, who also heard him lecture. No bridges had been built at that time, and it was necessary to ford the rivers and streams when they were encountered. During the years 1858 and 1859 Mr. Coggeshall was engaged in driving the horses attached to his father's canal boat, and he then returned to the farm, on which he worked until the family started for Illinois. The Civil war was in progress at this time, and Mr. Coggeshall, while in Illinois with his family, enlisted as a recruit in Company E, Seventy-ninth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He subsequently served for eighteen months, the last six months as corporal, and participated in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, as well as in several smaller engagements. On September 23, 1865, he received his honorable discharge and was mustered out of the service at Springfield, Illinois, with an excellent record as a soldier. In 1866 he returned to Wabash county and started working by the month until he had accumulated enough means to embark on a career of his own. In the spring of 1877 he moved to Sumner county, Kansas, where he resided until the fall of 1880, and then returned to Wabash county, Indiana. A period of renting followed, and he finally became the owner of a property to which he added from time to time until he became one of the substantial agriculturists of his community. During all the years in which he has been a resident of Wabash county Mr. Coggeshall's name has been a synonym for upright manhood and good citizenship. He owned 100 acres in farm land and eight acres in the village of Somerset. He has given his influence and means to the betterment of society, to schools and church, to the support of good government and order, and to the industries which he has believed calculated to promote the interests of this section of his state. He has always been a republican, and has acted efficiently in public position, being township assessor for five years and deputy assessor for a like period. He is a valued comrade of the Grand Army of the Republic.

In 1868 Mr. Coggeshall was married to Miss Mary E. Pavey, of Miami county, Indiana, a daughter of John and Elizabeth (West) Pavey, farming people. To this union there have been born three children: Martha E., who married John Fleming and has had three children - John, who died in infancy; James M. and Hugh - Otto E., who died in infancy, and Isaac M., who married Grace Bruebaker and has two children, James Ellis and Alva Roy.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



ALEX FLORA
A record of good citizenship, including three years of faithful service as a soldier of the Union during the Civil war, of steadfast integrity in all his relations with his fellow men, and of acquisition of an honorable prosperity in material things, is what distinguishes Alex Flora in addition to the fact of his long residence in Wabash county. Mr. Flora is no longer under the necessity of pursuing active labors, but lives in the enjoyment of the fruits of a well-spent life on his home place of fifty-five acres in Paw Paw township, located on the south side of the road three miles east of Roann.

Alexander Flora was born in Wayne county, Ohio, October 16, 1840, a son of Abe and Mary (Groshon) Flora. His father was a native of Germany and his mother of Switzerland, and the record of the Groshon family in Wabash county will be found on other pages. His parents were married in New York, after coming to this country, and subsequently moved out to Ohio, rented land there, and finally came to Wabash county, where Abe Flora bought sixty acres from Ferdinand Groshon in Paw Paw township. The land was all covered with woods, and most of the familiar pioneer conditions still existed. Deer were so plentiful in the woods about their home, that Mr. Flora's mother one day killed a deer with a hatchet. After clearing up and improving his land, Abe Flora lived there until his death, followed by his wife, and both were more than seventy years of age when they passed away. Their six children were: Alex; Edward, who went out to the war in Company B of the Forty-seventh Indiana Infantry under Captain Goodwin, and was killed in the battle of Champion Hill; Leonard; John; Ellen, who died unmarried; and Marshall.

A boy of twelve years when the family came to Wabash county, Alex Flora has a keen recollection of the journey, which was made with a one-horse wagon. He grew up on the farm which was occupied by his father, and as the oldest son a large share of home duties fell upon his shoulders. In order to get an education, he had to walk through the woods to a log schoolhouse that stood on Paw Paw creek, but it was practical experience rather than book learning that equipped him for a useful career. Before the war he worked out at wages on different farms, and had just reached his majority when the war came on. At the first call for troops he enlisted in 1861, in Company B of the Forty-seventh Indiana Infantry, and though in many engagements up and down the Mississippi Valley he was never wounded. His term of enlistment was for three years, and when the term expired he was sick in the hospital. The rest of the regiment re-enlisted but by the time he was well enough the war had closed. During his service the closest call he had was at the battle of Champion Hill, where the bullets flew around him like hail, and the ramrod of his gun was shot off.

After leaving the hospital in New Orleans Mr. Flora came back to Wabash county, and spent three months in the employ of Daniel Ward on Eel river. He then married the daughter of his employer, Eliza Ward, who died in the following year. There was one child of that union, Eliza, who died after becoming the wife of William Watts, leaving three children, Edward, Buford and Howard. Mr. Flora married for his second wife Susan Squires, daughter of Thomas Squires and widow of Harry Martindale, who had died during the war. By her first husband Mrs. Flora had one child, Rose, now deceased, who was the wife of Oscar Caruthers. The Caruthers children are: Harry, Guy, Estelle, Blanche, Paul, Frank and Lilly. Mr. and Mrs. Flora have the following children: William, who lives two miles south of his father's place in Paw Paw township, and who also supervises the farming operations on his father's farm, married Myrtle Merrick, and their children are Harold: Hugh, Monterey, Edith, Margaret, Kathleen, Howard and Irene. Dora Ellen is the wife of Chauncey Mylin of Paw Paw township, and their three children are Helen, Glenn and Lois. Erma is unmarried and lives at home with her father. Hattie is the wife of Homer Dunfee, and their children are Verne, Houston, John S., Louise and Leah Ruth.

After his first marriage Mr. Flora and his brother Leonard rented a farm of eighty acres from Mr. Day of Pleasant township. Their partnership as renters continued for three years. Following his second marriage Mr. Flora moved to his wife's farm, which is now the property of Howard Squires. It has eighty acres, and is also located in Paw Paw township. The principal improvements of that estate are due to the energy of Mr. Flora, who put up buildings, tiled the low land, cleared off the woods and brush, and lived there and prospered and reared his family. His home was on that place for twenty years, until he sold to Howard Squires. Mr. Flora then bought his present place from Amos Ivans. This too has much to show as evidence of the enterprise of Mr. Flora, and all the buildings were erected under his management. Only ten acres were cleared when he took possession, and he has laid tile, put up fences, and carried on other improvements in connection with his work as a general farmer. Mr. Flora is one of the honored members of the army which fought for the union of states fifty years ago, and has membership with the Grand Army of the Republic at Roann. In politics he followed the fortunes of the party which had control of the government during the war, and has always done his best to live up to the ideals of good citizenship in every relation. Mr. Flora is a Deacon in the Paw Paw Christian Church.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



CHAUNCEY MAXWELL MYLIN
Of the younger generation identified with the agricultural activities of Paw Paw township, there is no better representative than Chauncey M. Mylin. A keen and alert young business man, he has brought ideas as well as hard labor into his vocation, and his showing has all the elements of success. His homestead comprises one hundred and sixty acres on the Laketon Road, on the west side of that thoroughfare, about nine miles north of Wabash.

A representative of an old and honored name in this county, C. M. Mylin was born on his grandfather Mylin's farm three-quarters of a mile north of Servia in Chester township on September 19, 1872. Chester township was the original place of settlement of the Mylin family in Wabash county. His parents were Henry E. and Mary E. (Sholty) Mylin. His mother was a daughter of William and Barbara (Hoffman) Sholty, pioneers of Pleasant township who came from Ohio and both died in Pleasant township. Mary E. Sholty was a girl when the parents drove all the distance from Ohio to Wabash county, and her earliest recollections were of a country covered with woods. After she married Henry Mylin they lived in Chester township. Henry E. Mylin was born on a farm in Chester township a son of Christian and Lucinda Mylin, who were among the first settlers of Chester township, and grandfather Mylin died on his farm north of Servia, survived many years by his widow, who passed away at the home of a daughter, Mrs. David Krisher at North Manchester. After their marriage Henry Mylin and wife lived on his father's farm north of Servia in Chester township for eight or nine years, and it was during this time that the son Chauncey M. was born. From that place they moved to the farm now occupied by Chauncey, Henry Mylin having acquired this land from his father-in-law, William Sholty. It had a set of buildings, and most of the land was under cultivation when he occupied it, and for a number of years followed the general lines of agriculture until retiring about 1904 to the village of Laketon, where his death occurred July 16, 1907, at the age of sixty-nine years. His life was one of useful labor, of kindly helpfulness in the community, and many friends paid him the tribute of their respect and esteem at the time of his death. The mother is still living in the village of Laketon. There were four children, mentioned as follows: Etnie B., who is now Mrs. Charles Moyer, of Laketon; Christian S. of Urbana; Shirley B., of Paw Paw township; and Chauncey M.

The youngest of the children, Chauncey M. Mylin, was about two and a half years of age when the parents moved to his present farm. His training was acquired by attendance at a district school, followed by one year in the public schools at Laketon, and two winters in the college of North Manchester. He early determined to make farming his regular vocation, and in all his activities along that line followed progressive methods and few of his contemporaries have made a better success. He lived at home until his marriage, afterwards rented the farm from his father for a number of years, and in January, 1912, bought the old place. Among the various improvements which should be credited to his labor and management is the fine ten-room modern dwelling, one of the best homes along the Laketon Road.

In the fall of 1894 Mr. Mylin married Dora E. Flora, daughter of Alex and Susan (Squires) Flora. A sketch of the Flora family is given in detail on other pages of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Mylin have three children: Helen, Glenn and Lois. Mr. Mylin affiliates with the Knights of the Maccabees, is a republican, and is a member of the United Brethren church, his wife being a member of the Christian church.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



JOHN GARST
Probably no family has been more prominently identified with the development of Wabash county from the time when it was nothing but a wilderness to the present, when it abounds with prosperous farms and thriving villages, the abode of a happy, contented population, than that bearing the name of Garst, a worthy representative of which is found in the person of John Garst, who is now cultivating a handsome farm in Waltz township. Mr. Garst's life has been one of constant and well-applied industry; he has succeeded in his earnest endeavors, and has become highly respected by those who have come into contact with him in any manner. He is a native of Roanoke county, Virginia, and was born February 10, 1844, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Brubaker) Garst.

The parents of Mr. Garst were both born in the Old Dominion state, and were there married. They were honest, industrious people, but were in modest financial circumstances, and finally came to the conclusion that they could better themselves and find better opportunities for their children in the newly opened West. Accordingly, about 1850, the father secured a horse and wagon, gathered together such means as he could, and with his little family struck out bravely for the woods of Indiana. It was a long, tiresome and dangerous journey, and at times it seemed that the horse would never be able to drag the wagon through the dense timber which the little party of immigrants encountered. However, they finally arrived in Wabash county, where the father took up eighty acres of timberland, on which was located a log cabin, and he spent one dollar for ten apple trees, which he planted in the weeds on his farm. This primitive structure was the family home for some years until the father was able to replace it with a more commodious frame structure. An energetic and hard-working man, Thomas Garst continued to reside in Waltz township during the remainder of his life, although he later added to his holdings from time to time until he owned 420 acres. He won a high place in the esteem of his fellow-citizens, and was always known as a public-spirited citizen in whom the utmost confidence could be placed. He and his wife were the parents of eight children: John, Jacob, Henry (deceased), Sarah, George, Eliza, Joel, and Mary.

John Garst, the oldest child of the family, was but six years of age when he was brought to Wabash county by his parents, and he still remembers the long and wearisome trip over the mountains, across the streams and through the forests . He was early put to work in assisting his father and brothers clear the homestead of its timber, and because of primitive conditions his education was decidedly limited. The first school which he attended was a deserted log cabin, in which the winter terms lasted for about two months, the teacher usually arriving at daylight and beginning his lessons when the first pupil would arrive. Later a frame school was erected, and terms in this building lasted three months a year. Thus Mr. Garst's education was slight and his opportunities for culture of a genuine sort were few, but one cannot now be in his presence long before realizing that he is a man of broad general information and with a wealth of knowledge on a number of subjects, so it is probable that he made the most of the opportunities that were granted him. He remained on the home farm, assisting his father, until he reached the age of twenty-six years, at which time he was married to Miss Lydia Stambaugh, daughter of William and Regina Stambaugh, natives of Pennsylvania. She had one brother and one sister: David and Mary. Mr. Stambaugh, after the death of his first wife, was married to Eliza Winger. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Garst: Lizzie, at home, who married Elza Burns, who met an accidental death about six weeks after their marriage, and Cora, who died at the age of six weeks.

At the time his father bought his additional 160 acres Mr. Garst purchased eighty acres, and subsequently purchased the balance of the land in 1883. He now owns 158 acres of farm land and four lots and three acres in Somerset. The present buildings were all erected prior to this time, but he has made numerous improvements of a modern character, and has practically rebuilt the house. From early boyhood he has been accustomed to the various duties pertaining to the management of a farm, and as the years have passed he has adopted modern ideas and methods, so that today he is one of the best-informed men in his line in the county. Public-spirited and progressive, he gives his earnest support to new industries and enterprises, and always contributes to the movements which promise to promote the progress of his county or township. He and his family now reside in Somerset, where they have lived for about thirty-five years. The farm lies across the river from Somerset. His home in Somerset is one of the finest and most modern in the village, and, while he did not erect the house, he has completely remodeled and modernized it. A member of the Brethren Church, he has served as a trustee for fifteen years. In political matters he is a democrat.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



MRS. ELIZABETH (CARTER) RIGGIN
Noteworthy among the residents of Paw Paw township is Mrs. Elizabeth Riggin, who rendered her country valuable service as a nurse during the Civil war, and later became the wife of one of the brave soldiers of that same war. She was born July 12, 1837, in Madison county, Ohio, a daughter of David and Arthelia (Kelley) Carter, both life-long residents of Ohio. Her father, a farmer, died in manhood's prime, in 1838, leaving three children, namely: Matilda, deceased, was the wife of Andrew Hamma; Melinda, deceased, married Rev. Samuel Mathews; and Elizabeth, the subject of this sketch. The mother married for her second husband Joshua Bozarth, and to them four children were born, namely: Reuhama, deceased, was the wife of John Lysinger; Nancy, deceased, became the wife of Samuel McCune; Virginia, deceased, was the wife of Jerome Black; and Emma, wife of Elijah Griffith. The mother, too, died at a comparatively early age, in 1852.

An infant when left fatherless, and but fifteen years old when her mother died, Elizabeth Carter early began to look out for herself, having no real home, but living with her sisters, or wherever she could be of use. Quick with the needle, she learned to sew with a neighbor, and did some dressmaking. When a young lady she lived for a time in Xenia, Ohio, where, having many of the qualifications requisite in a good nurse, she was frequently caned into sick rooms to care for patients quite ill. In 1862, during the Civil war, she volunteered as a nurse, and having been accepted was located at Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, where she remained until the close of the conflict. Being then highly recommended by Major McDermot, she was for four months matron in Dayton, Ohio, at the Military Institute that had then just been started by Captain Jack. Resigning her position in Dayton, Miss Carter went to New Holland, Ohio, where, on February 14, 1866, she was married to Ross Riggin, to whom she had plighted her troth before the breaking out of the war, and who had just then received his honorable discharge from the army and returned to his home.

Mr. Riggin was born in Williamsport, Pickaway county, Ohio, January 10, 1840, and at the age of twelve years was left an orphan. He grew to manhood in his native county, and there commenced the struggle of life on his account as a tiller of the soil. At the first regular call for volunteers, after the first three months' call, he enlisted, at Washington Court House, Ohio, in Company A, First Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and served throughout the Civil war, taking part in many of its more important battles.

Locating after their marriage in Rush county, Indiana, Mr. and Mrs. Riggin lived on a rented farm for eighteen months, and then came to Wabash county and bought forty acres of range land in Noble township. A log cabin stood on the place, and after living in it for five years, during which time they had bought another forty acres of near-by land, they sold at an advantage, and again rented for a time. They subsequently bought an eighty-acre farm near Wabash, and a short time later sold that. Then, in order that their children might attend school in Wabash, Mr. Riggin rented the King and McNamee estate of five hundred acres, and was there profitably engaged in the stock business until the firm of King and McNamee was dissolved, fifteen years later. Locating then in North Manchester, Mr. Riggin, in partnership with William Neighbor, was for two years engaged in buying and shipping stock. Moving then to Urbana with his family, he formed a partnership with Ed Long, and was there similarly engaged until his death, June 24, 1897, at the comparatively early age of fifty-seven years. Mr. Riggin had previously bought the farm now occupied by Mrs. Riggin, who had the house entirely remodeled, and assumed possession of the place in 1903. Her farm contains one hundred and six acres of good land, and is finely located in Paw Paw township, on the west side of the Laketon road, about eight miles north of Wabash.

Mr. and Mrs. Riggin reared eight children, namely: Blanche, who died at the age of nineteen years; Clara, who married Felix Stone, died in 1891, leaving two children, Ross, who married Essie Thorn and who has one child, Wm. Jack, and Lillian; Samuel Edson is the 3rd of Mrs. Riggin's children; Pearl, wife of Fred Keefaber, has one child, Arthelia; Mabel died at the age of nineteen years: Frank; Marie, wife of George Weaver, has one child, Charles; and Mary, who died at the age of twenty-one years in California.

In his political affiliations Mr. Riggin was a republican, and he belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic. He was a self-made man in every sense implied by the term, owing his success in life to his own persevering and persistent efforts. From the age of twelve years he helped support his mother, as a boy and youth worked for his board while attending the winter terms of school, in that way obtaining a practical education, fitting him for a business career.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



SCHUYLER COLFAX LONG
Almost every older resident of Wabash county can point to many interesting contrasts between the present and the earlier days with which he was familiar. No more interesting illustration of the change in social and economic conditions, and the progress in all directions, can be found than exist on the Schuyler C. Long farm in Paw Paw township. On one hand is the log cabin home, where Mr. Long and both his children were born. On the other hand is the modern rural residence, erected in 1907, and with all the comforts and conveniences that indicate some of the farthest advances in country life. Though it was not unusual and in no sense discreditable to have been born in a log cabin fifty years ago, Mr. Long has really come up to prosperity from an early career which was by no means affluent, and it is with commendable satisfaction that he can now regard the many evidences of his material prosperity and his influence as a citizen in his community. He is the owner of two hundred and forty acres located on the Laketon road on the west side of that thoroughfare, ,about six miles from the city of Wabash.

Schuyler Colfax Long was born in a log house owned by his father July 2, 1868. The name bestowed upon him shows that his father was an ardent admirer of one of Indiana's greatest sons, Schuyler Colfax, who was at that time one of the foremost men in national life. Mr. Long is a son of Samuel and Marjorie (Richards) Long. Samuel Long came from Pennsylvania to Ohio, and from there to Indiana, and was married in Paw Paw township. When he settled in the same locality where his sons now live, all the surrounding country was covered with woods, and a space had to be cleared by felling the large trees in order to make room for the cabin. The pioneer of the family was Jacob Long, who on coming to Wabash county entered a large tract of land, sufficient to give each of his sons eighty acres apiece. Samuel Long was contented for a few years with the log building, but subsequently built a frame barn 32x24 feet, and having bought eighty acres across the road from his brother Jacob, moved into the frame house which had been built as a part of its improvements and died there April 12, 1895, at the age of sixty-five years. His widow is still living on the old homestead. That homestead was the site chosen by Grandfather Jacob Long and his wife Elizabeth, who journeyed into Wabash county many years ago with ox teams and a big wagon. One of the family traditions is that just before their arrival at their destination in Paw Paw township, a big black grizzly bear crossed their path. After leaving Ohio the grandparents located for a time in Grant county, but moved from there into Wabash. Their home was the eighty acres of land where Mrs. Samuel Long now lives. Its dwelling was a big double log house, the grandparents living on one side and the son Jacob in the other. Mrs. Jacob Long was the first person to be buried in the Long cemetery, which was laid out on the Long farm. After her death grandfather Long lived alone in the double house for many years, and cooked his own meals at the fireplace and never had a stove. He died in that home and his remains also rest in the Long cemetery. Two of the sons, Josiah and Emanuel, whose bodies are laid in Long cemetery, were both soldiers in the war of the Rebellion and gave their lives for the cause of the Union, one of them falling on the battlefield. Grandfather Long possessed many of the accomplishments of the true frontiersman. He was acquainted with the woods and all the environments of a new country, and one of his diversions in Wabash county was the setting of bear traps, and in his time he caught a number of those animals. Grandfather Jacob Long and several of his sons, including Samuel, followed a somewhat unique occupation in the early days in the making of sugar troughs for the Indians. These troughs were sold to the red men who still were in an Indian village of this vicinity, and when one of the Longs went to the village to collect the money many scores of dogs would rush out and stop the approach of the traveller until the Indians called "sic-em," a term which among the Indians meant just the opposite of what it does among white men. It. was a common sight in those days to see Indian squaws riding through the woods with their papooses strapped upon their back.

Samuel Long, father of Schuyler C., was quite a young man when he came to Wabash county, and followed the usual profession of the family as a farmer. He was also one of the first men to introduce into his section the threshing machine. It was a very crude machine which he first operated for the benefit of the farmers, and in subsequent years he kept up with the advance in this type of farm machinery and bought several new ones, each one more perfect than the last. Finally his son Schuyler bought out his interest, and the Long family have for many years been known in Wabash county for their identification with that phase of agricultural industry. The father also operated sawmills, and one of his partners in that industry was his son Alexander.

Schuyler C. Long grew up in and about his birthplace, attended the district scl1oollocated at the corner of the road, and was employed in the duties of the home farm and in following the threshing outfit among the harvest fields in various parts of Wabash county. For the past twenty-three years he has divided his time between the operation of a threshing outfit and paper hanging, which is his regular trade. He has worked at his trade all over the county.

On December 7, 1895, Mr. Long married Anna Dunfee, daughter of William and Elizabeth Dunfee. After their marriage Mr. Long rented his present place for two years, living in the old log house, which was his birthplace, and in which were born to him and his wife their two children - Mabel and Carl. His first purchase was eighty acres of land, and in March, 1911, this was increased by one hundred and sixty acres from the Deardorf estate. His land is now cultivated in general farm crops, and affords a most substantial basis for the prosperity of the Long family. The modern farm residence was erected in the fall of 1907.

Besides his interests in the country, Mr. Long is a stockholder in the Farmers State Bank at Urbana. In politics he is a republican, and affiliates with Tent No. 70 of the Order of Maccabees at Urbana, and is a member of the First Christian church, located at the corner of his farm, and he served as treasurer of the church society twelve years.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



GEORGE W. ROSER
No richer or more productive land may be found in Wabash county than that which lies within the confines of Waltz township, made so by the intelligent treatment and methods of the agriculturists here. Among those who have profited by their industry and are now numbered among the substantial citizens of this community is George W. Roser, a native son of Wabash county, who has lived in the near vicinity of his present home during the past quarter of a century. Mr. Roser was born in Wabash county March 4, 1866, and is a son of Jeremiah and Catherine (Renaker) Roser.

Jeremiah Roser was born in Pennsylvania, and was a young man when he came to Indiana, leaving Philadelphia in 1849 and coming to this vicinity by canal-boat, the only means of transportation to be secured at that time. This journey consumed about a week. On his arrival in Wabash county he purchased a tract of land which was all located in the timber, and there built a small log cabin and started in to clear and cultivate his property, but before he had completed his task accepted a favorable opportunity to sell. Following this, he moved about for some time, living at various places in the county, but finally settled down in Waltz township, where he spent the remaining years of his life in successful agricultural pursuits. Mr. Roser was married to Susan Ridenour, a member of the old Ridenour family of Wabash county, and they became the parents of six children. After the death of his first wife he was married to Catherine Renaker, who was a native of Ohio, and she died September 8, 1892, having been the mother of four children.

George W. Roser was granted ordinary educational advantages, and from boyhood was trained in agricultural pursuits. He early adopted the tilling of the soil as his life work, and began his operations on the farm opposite to his present property. About the year 1897 or 1898 he located on the farm which he is now operating, the old Ridenour homestead, the buildings on which were all erected by the original owners, although they have since been remodeled and improved by Mr. Roser, who has installed numerous improvements and added machinery and equipment. Whatever success Mr. Roser has attained, and it is not inconsiderable, has been gained through his own efforts and ability. He has labored energetically and steadfastly and has studied the best methods of enriching the land. As a business man he is known as one ever ready to grasp an opportunity, but his dealings have been carried on in such an honorable manner that he holds a high position in the esteem and respect of those who have come into contact with him. In political matters Mr. Roser is a democrat, but he has found his farming duties so engaging that he has had little time for the activities of public life. With his family he attends the Lutheran church, where he is serving, as a member of the board of trustees.

Mr. Roser was married March 24, 1889, in Waltz township, to Miss Permelia Ridenour, the estimable daughter of David C. and Catherine (Smith) Ridenour, of the old family of that name, and seven children have been born to the union: Elzie, Philip H., Ola M., Jessie, Juineta and George, all born in Waltz tosnship. Vern H., the fifth child born, died aged seven weeks. Mr. Roser has a Marion automobile, and he was the first farmer in Waltz township to own a car.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



DAVID C. RIDENOUR
All his life David C. Ridenour has spent thus far in Wabash county. He now resides in Noble township, but spent the most of his life in Waltz township. He was born in Waltz township on April 1, 1843, and is a son of David and Sarah (Schawver) Ridenour, a family that has long been established hereabout. David Ridenour, the father of the subject, was born in Pennsylvania on February 7, 1802, and he and his wife reared a family of twelve children, of which goodly number David C., of this review, was the ninth in order of birth. The others were Barbara, Catherine, Samuel, Lydia, Susana, Isaiah, Sarah, John, George, Mary, and Daniel. Of these all are deceased except Isaiah and Daniel.

In 1843 the father and mother brought their little flock here and settled on a farm of 240 acres just across the line from Noble township, in Waltz township. This land was covered with a dense forest growth, and on it Mr. Ridenour built a small cabin, which he replaced two years later with a more pretentious and commodious frame house.

The country surrounding was in a wild and unsettled state, and Indians, more or less inclined to unpleasantness, infested the woods. At one time, while residing in Ohio, Barbara, the eldest daughter, when yet a small girl, got lost in the woods not far from the house, and before she was discovered her absence caused the family a deal of mental agony. Fortune favored them in this, as in many another circumstance, and the little daughter of the wilderness learned a lesson she did not soon forget.

The parents lived on this place to the end of their days, and did much to reclaim it from its wilderness state to one of fruitfulness before death called them.

David C. Ridenour, their son, married Catherine Smith, the daughter of Philip Smith and his wife, Pamelia (Unger) Smith, and the mother of Mrs. Ridenour still lives at the fine old age of ninety-five. The brothers and sisters of Mrs. Ridenour are Jacob, Benjamin, Clarissa, and Helena. The oldest and youngest of these are both deceased. Their father, Philip Smith, was born in Germany, and came in early life to Wabash county.

David C. Ridenour in his boyhood days attended the district school for two months each winter during a few years. Both parents spoke the German language, and they talked it in the home, thus insuring their children an intimate knowledge of the mother tongue of their parents. Mr. Ridenour was twenty-two years of age when he left the home fireside and married, and, though he was without means, he settled on a farm of eighty acres owned by his father, and this he put in excellent shape within the next few years. Comfortable buildings took the place of old and primitive cabins, and the land was cleared and put under the plow. Later he added thirty-five acres, and here he lived until 1896, when he moved to his present place, an eighty acre farm in Section 22, Noble township. He has since that time, however, come into ownership of another farm of 160 acres, which he operates independent of his home place. He owns in all 355 acres in three separate farms.

The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Ridenour: Permelia, who married George W. Roser; Edwin, who died in infancy; Lillie, also died in childhood; Anna, married Philip Pence, and David, Jr., who married Nellie Votaw.

The family are members of the Lutheran church, and Mr. Ridenour has held the office of deacon and of trustee in the church, as well as of elder and secretary. He has served Waltz township ably as supervisor, and has always been a good citizen and active in democratic politics.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



WILLIAM A. RICHARDS
A retired farmer, an old soldier, and an ex-superintendent of the Wabash County Infirmary, William A. Richards is numbered among the best known and most respected citizens of Paw Paw township, where he and his wife own and occupy a fine farm of one hundred and thirty acres, situated on both sides of the Laketon road, about five and one-half miles north of Wabash. A native of Ohio, he was born in Coshocton county, May 30, 1840, a son of Josiah Richards.

Josiah Richards was born in Pennsylvania, but spent much of his earlier life in Ohio, living there until after his marriage. In the fall of 1842, having decided to follow the march of civilization westward, he came with his little family to Indiana, locating in Paw Paw township, one-half mile north and one-half mile west of Urbana, making his way thither through the almost pathless woods in a covered wagon. He spent a few days with his wife's brother, Thomas Dunfee, sleeping in the wagon in which he and his family had made the journey. Having secured title to forty acres of heavily timbered land, he put up the customary round log house of the pioneer, with a puncheon floor, stick and mud chimney, and greased paper window, the floor, however, covering only the space occuČpied by the bed. Wolves and other wild animals were then numerous and destructive, frequently visiting the clearing. He improved a goodly portion of the land, and subsequently put up more substantial buildings. In the spring of 1864 he moved to another farm, located on the Eel river, between Laketon and Roann, and there continued farming and stock raising and breeding. For twenty-six years he was one of the foremost horse breeders in Wabash county, keeping high bred stallions, and being the pioneer horseman of this part of the state. He was always an exhibitor at the county fairs, and each year captured many premiums. He subsequently moved to the farm of his son-in-law, Samuel Long, and there resided until his death, in January, 1879, at the age of sixty-three years. He was a self-made man, beginning life with small means, and through his own work accumulated a good property.

The maiden name of the wife of Josiah Richards was Eunice Dunfee. She was born in Ohio, and died in 1885, on the farm now occupied by her son William, at the home of her daughter, who was then living on the place. Of the eleven children born of their union, two died in childhood, one in Lafayette, Indiana, and one in Paw Paw township. The names of the others are as follows: Marjorie, widow of Samuel Long; William A., the special subject, who, with his sister Marjorie, were the only children born in Ohio; Julia Ann, deceased, married Nelson Purdy; John; James; Selena L., deceased, married Robert Smyers; Eunice Malinda, wife of James Jack, and Josiah B., twins; Rue Ellen, wife of Jacob Smith.

But two years old when he came with his parents to Wabash county, William A. Richards grew to manhood on the old homestead, acquiring his education in the pioneer log school house, at the same time obtaining a good knowledge of the various branches of agriculture under his father's instruction, and later working some at the carpenter's trade. In August, 1863, inspired by patriotic ardor, he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Eighteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under command of Captain E. W. Fluhart, and served until March, 1864. During the time he was with his command, Mr. Richards took part in two important engagements, one at Blue Springs, Tennessee, and one at Walkers Ford, in the same state. After the latter battle he was detailed to nurse duty at the hospital in Taswell, Tennessee, and there continued until receiving his honorable discharge, at Indianapolis.

Returning home, Mr. Richards again became an inmate of the parental household, and worked both in Paw Paw township and in Illinois, going back and forth by rail. Marrying in 1872, he rented land for three years, and was then appointed by the county commissioners as superintendent of the Wabash County Infirmary, a position which he filled most efficiently and satisfactorily from March 17, 1875, until March 17, 1885. During that period Mr. Richards had purchased fifty-five acres of his present farm from Nancy A. Long, and to the original acreage he has since added by purchase from time to time until now he and his wife own one hundred and thirty acres of finely improved land, on which he has erected substantial buildings. He retired from active farming about eighteen years ago, the farm being now ably managed by his son.

Mr. Richards married, May 12, 1872, Margaret Foster, a daughter of William and Sarah (Drake) Foster, of Coshocton county, Ohio. Two children have blessed their union, namely: Glenn, of Toledo, Ohio, a railway mail clerk between Toledo and St. Louis, married Mae Louise Stokely; and George A., running the home farm. Politically Mr. Richards has always been a stanch republican, and is now actively identified with the progressive republicans. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and takes much interest in the organization.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



Deb Murray