HENRY THOMAS.
One of the fine landed estates of Wabash county is the La Fontaine Stock Farm, which comprises 104 1/2 acres and which is most eligibly situated in Liberty township, one and one-half miles east of the thriving little city of La Fontaine. Mr. Thomas is the owner of this admirably improved farmstead, and in the pursuance of his farm enterprise he has brought to bear much dynamic energy and marked circumspection, so that his success has been of high order and gives him status as one of the progressive and representative farmers and stock growers of this favored section of the Hoosier State. He gives special attention to the breeding of Duroc Jersey swine of the highest grade, and through his efforts he has done much to raise the local standard in the line of industry with which he is identified, his estate likewise giving to him excellent returns from diversified agriculture. He is a native of Wabash county and is a member of a family whose name has been long and prominently identified with the civic and industrial history of the county.

Henry Thomas was born on the old family homestead that lies across the road from his present farm, in Liberty township, and the date of his nativity was May 12, 1869. He is a son of Samuel and Mary (Michael) Thomas, both of whom reside at La Fontaine, where the father is living retired, after long years of earnest and productive endeavor in connection with the great basic industry of agriculture. He was born in Butler county, Ohio, and his wife is a native of Cass county, Indiana, where her parents settled in the pioneer days and where her marriage to Samuel Thomas was solemnized. Soon after the close of the Civil war Samuel Thomas removed to Wabash county, and here he became an industrious and successful farmer, the while he had the popular confidence and esteem that made him influential in public affairs of a local order. He and his wife are numbered among the venerable and honored citizens of Wabash county, and of their four children three are living, Albert, who is engaged in the insurance business at Portland, Jay county; Arthur S., who is a substantial farmer of Wayne township, Huntington county; and Henry, who is the immediate subject of this review.

Passing the days of his boyhood and youth on the homestead farm which was the place of his birth, Henry Thomas there found ample demands upon his time and attention in rendering consistent aid in the work of the homestead, and he continued to attend the local schools during the winter terms until he had attained to his legal majority. In his independent operations as a farmer and stock-grower he has shown that enterprise and good judgment that inevitably make for success, and he has a landed estate of which he may well be proud, as it gives palpable evidences of thrift and prosperity and is one of the model places of the county. His average herd of pure-bred Duroc-Jersey swine numbers about two hundred head, and at the time of this writing the breeding heads of the herd are the fine registered types bearing the names of "Perfect Professor," "Orian Boy," and "Indiana Volunteer." He sells each year many of this strain of hogs for breeding purposes, and is known as one of the leading breeders of the Duroc-Jerseys in this part of the State.

In politics Mr. Thomas supported the cause of the Republican party from the time of reaching his majority until the national election of 1912, when he transferred his allegiance to the newly organized Progressive party. In the primary election in Wabash county in the spring of 1914 he received nomination, on the Progressive ticket, for the office of county commissioner, as representative of the south district of the county. He and his family hold membership in the United Brethren church at Bethlehem, and he is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of the Maccabees. On February 2, 1893, Mr. Thomas wedded Miss Phoebe Hettler, daughter of Christopher L. Hettler, who is a representative citizen of Marion, judicial center of Grant county, Mrs. Thomas having been reared and educated in that county. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have three children, Hazel, Paul and Lucille, the two younger children remaining at the parental home, and Hazel, who was graduated in a business college at Marion, being employed as a bookkeeper in that city, where she resides in the home of her maternal grandfather.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



S. L. MOHR.
Though a resident of his present farm in Noble township only since February, 1910, Mr. S. L. Mohr has already accomplished a great deal as a substantial agriculturist, and has made himself a man of influence in the community. His fine farm shows every evidence of thrift and good management, and his long experience as a practical farmer in Illinois and Indiana was a guarantee of his continued prosperity in Wabash county.

S. L. Mohr was born in the state of Missouri, a son of John Quincy Adams and Maria (Kunkler) Mohr. Both parents were natives of Ohio, but their parents were born and spent their early years in the state of Pennsylvania. From Ohio John Q. A. Mohr and wife located in Woodford county, Illinois, near the town of El Paso, and the vicinity was the birthplace of most of their children, who were eight in number, six daughters and two sons, named as follows: George K.; S. L.; Genevieve and Geneva, twins; Ida; Anna; Salome and Ellen. The parents died in 1888.

Mr. Mohr was reared in Woodford county, Illinois, was trained in the public schools and also by the discipline of the home farm, and in 1881 married Miss Frances C. Kamp. She was the daughter of George and Susan Kamp, also of Woodford county, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Mohr became the parents of five children, all of whom were born before they left Illinois. Clarence E. Mohr, the first, married Ola Jones; Harry K. married Rachel Copas; Howard died at the age of three months; Louis and Elsie are the youngest. From Illinois Mr. Mohr moved his family to Benton county, Indiana, and then in 1910 acquired the ownership and located on his present farm. It comprises one hundred and sixty acres of fertile land, all well improved and productive of some of the best crops raised in this part of Wabash county. His enterprise and industry has wrought many changes in the farm in four years time. The buildings have all been put in a fine state of repair, some new ones have been added, the fences among the fields are indicative of an energetic management, and when referring to this farm the people in that community speak of it as one of the best in the township. Though with only a brief residence in Noble township, Mr. Mohr is a representative citizen, has a wide circle of friends, and is highly thought of and respected in the other communities in this state and Illinois where most of his years were spent.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



WARREN BIGLER.
For nearly forty years a resident of the city of Wabash, Warren Bigler, in addition to a successful career in business, has made a name for himself in republican politics, is well remembered over the state at large for his capable services in the office of Auditor of State a few years ago, and is a man of broad interests both in practical affairs and in scholarship.

Warren Bigler is a native of Indiana, born in Shelby county, September 24, 1851. He is a son of Lewis and Melissa (Bradenburg) Bigler, early settlers of Shelby county and long residents there. His father was a miller by occupation, and died in the community which was for so many years his home in the year 1870. After his death the mother took up her abode in the city of Wabash, and spent the closing years of her life there, dying October 26, 1902.

The country schools of his native community supplied Warren Bigler with his early education, and that was followed with a course of study at the famous old Normal Academy at Lebanon conducted by Dr. Alfred Holbrook, an institution which during a period of more than half a century trained hundreds of youths who later took their places as men of light and leading in their generation. In 1873 Mr. Bigler began the study of law in the office of Hord & Blair at Shelbyville, and during sixteen months spent as a student he also compiled a set of abstracts of title to the real estate of the city of Shelbyville. That was Mr. Bigler's first experience in a work with which he has since been almost continuously identified. In June, 1875, moving to Wabash, he at once began the compilation of a complete set of abstracts of title to the lands of Wabash county. That undertaking had never been carried out in a thoroughgoing fashion, and Mr. Bigler's set of abstracts was not only the first which could be regarded as complete, but was also a highly creditable accomplishment both to himself and the county. Mr. Bigler was one of the original incorporators of the State Association of Abstractors of Title, and honored by election as its first president.

From almost the beginning of his residence in Wabash, Mr. Bigler became identified with politics and good government in the community, and later his name and influence came into prominence over the district and state. He repeatedly served as delegate to county, congressional, district and state conventions, and for many years was closely identified with the active political organizations of the city and the commonwealth, being connected with the state committee in some capacity for eighteen years. For years he has been a member of the Columbia Club of Indianapolis, the most influential political and social club of the state.

In 1900 Mr. Bigler served as one of the secretaries of the Republican National Convention, held at Philadelphia. In 1905 he was appointed state auditor by Governor Hanley to fill out the unexpired term of David E. Sherrick, and, in that capacity, brought to his official duties a service that reflected a high degree of credit upon himself and the man to whom he owed his appointment. This statement is emphasized by the report of a special examining committee in September, 1913, made, it will be remembered, by a Democratic body - the State Board of Accounts. After testifying to the faithfulness and thoroughness of Mr. Bigler's service, eight years before, the committee concluded with the statement that the methods of his department were "beyond criticism."

Mr. Bigler for a number of years was trustee of the Eastern Hospital for the Insane at Richmond. He served for eighteen years on the Wabash Board of School Trustees and for ten years was president of that body. During his identification with the educational affairs of the city, as president of the public system, not only was the handsome high school of the present erected, but three substantial ward structures were built and all the remaining schoolhouses were improved. In other words, the entire machinery of the public school system was expanded and modernized.

In 1901, when the Carnegie Library building was erected, Mr. Bigler was a member of the library board as well as of the building committee, as also of the original board which secured the appropriation from Carnegie which made possible the present elegant library and equipment.

In Wabash Mr. Bigler has been closely identified with the leading business enterprises for a number of years, and few commercial undertakings have originated during his residence in the city without some aid and favor on his part. In this connection he was one of the founders and original officers of the Wabash Board of Trade, which was chiefly instrumental in locating the Wabash Paper Mills, the cabinet factories, the hat works and other enterprises which were given the city a high standing as an industrial center. Further, the establishment and development of the building and loan associations, which up to a very recent period were such strong agents in the furtherance of local prosperity, were largely due to his honest work and promotion. The record shows that his activities in this field cover a continuous period of nearly thirty years, and that he has been identified with the various organizations of that nature when taken together for an aggregate of half a century. In a word, his energy, his ability and his broad experience have made him a large factor in the extension of all the industrial and financial activities of his home community.

On October 5, 1875, Mr. Bigler married Miss Carrie Major of Shelbyville, Indiana. They have one son, Herbert Spencer Bigler. Although always a busy man, Mr. Bigler has found time to travel, and has been a visitor not only to the most attractive and famous spots in our own country in Canada and in Mexico, but has traveled extensively in Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Austria, Switzerland, France and the British Isles. He is not a globe trotter, but has been a student and an observer and has acquired an understanding of countries and people among whom he has sojourned to a degree far above that of the mere tourist. In his home county Mr. Bigler is regarded as one of the best read men, and his interests are of exceptional range. His library, selected with the greatest care and discrimination during the last two score years, is without equal in the county as a private collection of read and readable books. Mr. Bigler is a natural lover of books and literature, has chosen his library volume by volume, not merely purchased it in sections, and the result is apparent in the library as well as in the man. He has membership in a number of the leading scientific societies, including the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the American Anthropological Society, the American Economic Association, American Sociological Society, the American Historical Association, and was for a number of years a contributor to the Babylonian and Egyptian Exploration Fund.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



JESSE D. COON. Agricultural industry in Wabash county has an able and successful exponent in the person of the popular citizen whose name introduces this paragraph and who is one of the substantial farmers and stock-growers of Liberty township, his progressiveness transcending his individual business operations to touch and influence those measures and enterprises that contribute to the general prosperity and advancement of the community.

Mr. Coon was born in Wayne township, Huntington county, Indiana, on the 28th of September, 1863, and is a son of George and Elizabeth (Harrell) Coon, the former of whom was born in Rush county, this state, and the latter in Fayette county. George Coon was a youth at the time of his parents' removal from Rush county to Wayne township, Huntington county, and there he eventually became a representative agriculturist and influential citizen. He continued his residence in Wayne township until his death and his wife, who survived him by a number of years, was a resident of the city of Wabash, Wabash county, at the time when she was summoned to the life eternal. Concerning the children the following brief data are given: Jacob is well upholding the prestige of the family name as one of the substantial farmers of Wayne township, Huntington county; John is employed at Marion, Grant county; Levi is a prosperous farmer of Liberty township, Wabash county; Jesse D., of this sketch, was the next in order of birth; Margaret A. is the wife of Albert R. Owens of Wabash county, and George is a resident of Wabash county.

On the old homestead farm in Huntington county Jesse D. Coon remained until he had attained to the age of twenty-two years, and he early began to prove an effective collaborator in the diversified work and management of the farm, the while he was afforded the advantages of the public schools in the little village of Banquo. His father gave him employment at stipulated wages after he reached his majority, and he was twenty-three years of age at the time of his marriage. His career has been one of consecutive industry and close adherence to the principles of integrity and honor, so that he has never lacked the confidence and high regard of those with whom he has come in contact in the varied relations of life. In 1892 Mr. Coon purchased twenty acres of land in Huntington county which he later sold, and in the fall of 1900 purchased his present farm comprising 160 acres and which is situated only one-fourth of a mile west of the village of Banquo, in his native county. On his original little farm of forty acres, twenty of which were given him by his father, and the other half being purchased by himself, he put forth such well directed effort that he gained more than ordinary success, the improvements which he has made on the place and the great care that he has given to all details of his enterprise making the farm a model of thrift and prosperity. In politics, though never an aspirant for official preferment or desirous of entering the turbulence of political contest, Mr. Coon accords unswerving allegiance to the Republican party and both he and his wife hold membership in the Christian church at Banquo.

On the 24th of December, 1886, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Coon to Miss Myrtle Sutton, a daughter of Aaron R Sutton, a well known farmer of Liberty township, where Mrs. Coon was reared and educated. Of the six children of this union the eldest is Effiel, who is the wife of Elmer Shaffer, of Liberty township; Elsie is the wife of Garl M. Stephens, of Banquo, Huntington county; Dessie is the wife of George Brane and they reside in the state of Montana; and Raymond, Mary and Lawrence remain at the parental home.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



WILLIAM HIDY.
One of the pioneer families of Wabash county, established in Chester township for more than three-quarters of a century, is that of Hidy, honored representatives of which are found in the persons of the late William Hidy and his son, Hallet B. Hidy, the latter of whom is still engaged in agricultural pursuits in the same township. In business life the men of this family have always been found honorable, as citizens have ever been ready to assist in the advancement of their community, in war they have been loyal to their country's flag and eager to protect it.

William Hidy was born in Virginia in the year 1796, and there grew to manhood and married a Miss Yeager; by whom he had three sons who later accompanied him to Indiana. After the death of his first wife, he married Mrs. Catherine (Parrott) Wilson, and they had four sons and four daughters: Mary, who married Robert Sellers and is now deceased; Rev. David, for years a minister of the gospel; Sarah; Matilda; George; Lucinda; Anderson and Hallet B.; all of whom are deceased with the exception of the last named. After his second marriage, October 19, 1837, William Hidy migrated to Wabash county and settled on the old Simonton road, where he purchased land of a pioneer settler, John Simonton. He settled in the uncultivated wilderness, cleared his property from the timber, erected a double log house for his family and other buildings for the shelter of his stock, and throughout his life continued to be engaged in agricultural pursuits. At the time of his death, which occurred in January, 1863, he was still the owner of his original eighty acres, although he had added considerable thereto. He was a stalwart Republican and a stanch supporter of the Union, took an interest in all matters of importance and was a man of influence and prominence in his community. His second wife passed away in September, 1864, and both are at rest in the Pleasant Grove cemetery. They both died in the faith of the Christian church, of which they had been members throughout life. All of their sons fought as soldiers during the Civil war, and one son by Mr. Hidy's first marriage was first a Confederate soldier and later wore the uniform of the Union.

Hallet B. Hidy was born on the old homestead in Chester township, Wabash county, Indiana, April 2, 1848, and is a son of William and Catherine (Parrott-Wilson) Hidy. He was granted an ordinary education in the public schools in the country, which he attended during the winter months, while he assisted his father in the farm work during the summers, as was customary with farmers' lads of his day and locality. When the Civil war broke out, he was too young to become a soldier, although he saw his brothers march away one by one to the front to tight under the flag, but finally, May 12, 1864, when he had just passed his sixteenth birthday, he managed to get himself accepted as a private in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-Eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in the 100 days' service, and was mustered into his regiment at Indianapolis. He received his honorable discharge in September, 1864, and returned to his home, but February 1, 1865, again enlisted, joining Company F, One Hundred and Fifty-third Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served until the close of the war, being honorably discharged in September, 1865, at Indianapolis. During the greater part of his service he was engaged in picket and scout duty and in watching the numerous guerrillas, and his record was ever that of a brave and faithful soldier, cheerful in the performance of his duty and admired by comrades and respected by officers.

Upon his return home he again assumed the vocation of farmer, and was so employed until the time of his marriage, October 15, 1868, to Miss Sarah F. Howe, daughter of Luke Howe. Mr. and Mrs. Hidy have had the following children: John Wilson, who died in 1891; Emma, who married Clyde Lowe of Warsaw, Indiana; Charley, who died young; Alice, who died at the age of twelve years; Elizabeth, who married Joe Kelley; Levi, who served as a member of the One Hundred and Fifty-seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, during the Spanish American war, and died October 31, 1902; Mary, who married Floyd Lewis, of Laud, Whitley county; Minnie, who married Virgil Lawrence; Frank D., who died February 8, 1906; and Bessie, who was married February 25, 1914, to Glenn Pence. The mother of these children died May 19, 1909, and was laid to rest in Pleasant Grove cemetery.

In the spring of 1869 Mr. and Mrs. Hidy located on the farm on which Mr. Hidy now resides, and on which he has continued to be engaged in farming ever since. This is a tract of thirty-eight and one half acres, located four miles east of Manchester, in Chester township, and is under a high state of cultivation, due to Mr. Hidy's intelligent efforts. He is possessed of more than ordinary business capacity, and in his various dealings with his fellow-men has shown himself a man of the highest integrity whose word may be relied upon as is his bond. He may well take a pride in his farm, for it has all been cleared by his own labor and the houses and other improvements are of his own construction. Politically Mr. Hidy is a Republican and much interested in local affairs. He is a stanch advocate of good roads, and was one of the subscribers for the bettering of the road along the front of his home, working his share out during the next three years. A progressive citizen, thoroughly alert, he is entitled to a place among the men who are making Wabash county one of the most prosperous in the state. He is popular among his comrades in John A. Logan Post, Grand Army of the Republic. In his youth Mr. Hidy joined the Christian church, which was the religious home of his parents. Later with his wife and two or three of the oldest children he united with the United Brethren church in its class in the neighborhood of their home, and continued members of that class until about five years ago, when the organization was abandoned. About four years ago Mr. Hidy and his youngest daughter went into the Methodist church, which was the closest society holding regular services, and Mr. Hidy still worships there, his daughter having since moved away.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



DR. A. L. STEPHENSON.
For many years Dr. Amos L. Stephenson was successfully engaged in dental practice in Wabash, and was long recognized among the ablest representatives of his profession in the county. He retired from practice in the year 1902, and has since lived a retired life in Wabash, devoting himself to his home and the quiet pursuits of private life. He is a native son of Wabash county, all his life having been practically spent within its confines. His parents were Hugh M. and Maria Jane (Thompson) Stephenson, of Wabash county, and concerning them and their lives in this community it is but fitting and proper that some mention be made.

The late Hugh M. Stephenson, one time sheriff of Wabash county and for many years identified with public affairs of considerable local importance, was a native of Iredell county, North Carolina, born there on December 29, 1818. He early came north and for a time he was located at South Bend, later moving to Marion and still later to Lagro. In the latter place he conducted a general store and while a resident of the community was elected sheriff of Wabash county, gaining the office on the Whig ticket, to which party he was ever an adherent.

In the year 1850, with many another, he became very enthusiastic over the discovery of gold in California, and he joined the band of wealth seekers who journeyed at all cost to that part of the country. Mr. Stephenson spent three years prospecting in the gold regions, but without very much success at any time, and then returned to Wabash county and located at Wabash. For a time he was occupied as a clerk in a general store, and then he engaged in the sale of farm implements, continuing thus until the year 1878. In that year he removed to Rochester and was thereafter busy for some little time in making an abstract of Fulton county. He passed away there in 1889.

His marriage to Miss Maria Jane Thompson in 1844 resulted in the birth of seven children, named as follows: Amos L., who is the immediate subject of this review; William Hartwell; Ella; one other who died in infancy, unnamed; Joseph T.; Frank M. and Rome C. Stephenson. The mother lived until November 6, 1913, and both are buried at Rochester.

Dr. Amos L. Stephenson, for years engaged in the practice of dentistry in Wabash, was born in Lagro, Indiana, on February 16, 1845, and this county has been his home from then till now. Here he received his early schooling, and he was only a boy when on March 11, 1862, he was mustered into the Fourteenth Indiana Battery at Indianapolis for service in the Union Army. He served from then to the close of the long and sanguinary struggle, participating in many minor engagements and campaigns, as well as being a participant in the Battle of Nashville and the Siege of Spanish Fort. In September, 1865, with the rank of first lieutenant, Dr. Stephenson was honorably discharged at Indianapolis, and at once returned to his Wabash county home. It was very soon thereafter that the young soldier resolved to take up the study of dentistry, and for two years he studied under the tutelage of Drs. Bechtol and Spaw. Dr. Stephenson embarked in practice on his own account, and he continued successfully in the work until 1902, in which year he felt himself able to retire from the profession and take his ease.

Socially Dr. Stephenson has membership in the Masonic fraternity and in the Elks, and he is also a member of James H. Emmett Post of the G. A. R. A Republican in his political views, he has given stanch support to the party, but he has never held office, preferring to confine his energies to private interests.

On November 24, 1870, Dr. Stephenson married Miss Alice Eagle, a daughter of Francis M. Eagle. She died on January 20, 1902, and the doctor later married, on January 23, 1912, Miss Blanche Thurston, daughter of William K. Thurston. The doctor and his wife are living quietly in the city where he was long active and prominent, and enjoy the friendship of a large circle of friends.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



MAHLON POWELL.
An active citizen of Wabash county for thirty years, Mahlon Powell was engaged in the loan business for a number of years and is now enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life at his home in Noble township.

Mahlon Powell was born in Putnam county, Ohio, November 28, 1842, one of the nine children of Nuter and Hetty (Owens) Powell. He and his brother Joshua are the only survivors of this family. Both parents spent their lives in Putnam county, Ohio, and were substantial farming people, a vocation also followed in the main by their children. The children, all of whom were natives of Ohio, were named as follows: Clorisa; Margarite; Emmeline and Mahlon, twins; Abi; Amanda; Perry ; Joshua and Amos.

Mahlon Powell after a number of years spent in business affairs elsewhere, moved to Wabash county in 1884, and settled in Noble township. His work has been chiefly along the lines of loaning money on farm property and some years ago he retired from aggressive participation in business. He has been a factor in public affairs, and is a republican who has good reason for pride in the fact that he cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. Mr. Powell has never married.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



GEORGE M. SEWELL.
A farmer and contractor who has made no small success during his active career, George M. Sewell has been identified by residence chiefly with Pleasant township, though he was born in Paw Paw township in this county. The Sewells came to Wabash county during the pioneer times, and were among the settlers whose work helped to extend the area of cultivation and clear the way for the thousands of substantial and prosperous homesteads that are now to be found in this section of the state.

George M. Sewell was born in Paw Paw township of Wabash county July 28, 1869, a son of William and Letitia (Brown) Sewell. His father was born in Virginia, but married after coming to Wabash county, and had seven children. Letitia Brown was born in Indiana. William Sewell was brought to Wabash county in 1844, the head of the family at that time being grandfather William Sewell, and they made their journey by rail as far as Ohio, and their goods and persons were transported over the road to Wabash by team and wagon. Grandfather Sewell settled first in Pleasant township, entering land direct from the government, and as there were no buildings he erected a log cabin as the first shelter and habitation of the family in this county.

William Sewell, the father, spent his career as a farmer, but the grandfather was by trade a mill wright, and did much serviceable work in his early years in Wabash county; helping to construct the first mill at Laketon. The father lived at different places, buying land and selling, and finally returned to the old homestead first entered by his father, and there lived until his death. He was then eighty-two years of age, and had preserved his health remarkably well until the last. He was an active member of the Christian church, and in politics a republican. The mother passed away at the age of fifty-two.

George M. Sewell grew up in Wabash county, was educated in the local schools, and on reaching his majority took his place in the ranks of hard and thrifty workers and has done a great deal of business in contracting. While he owns a good farm, he hires all the help to operate it. Mr. Sewell married Della White, daughter of Gilman and Mary Jane (Stewart) White. They were married in 1889, and they now have a fine family of children, several of whom have already taken their places among the useful workers in the younger generation. These children are: Bernice, born February 12, 1890, on April 19, 1911, married Marion Ireland, and has one child, Geraldine; Howard, born July 28, 1893, was married to Miss Fern Hutzner, of Disko, July 29, 1914; Wayne, born September 9, 1895; Wanda, born August 17, 1898; Mary Jane, born October 17, 1900; Carmen, born December 23, 1904; and Anna Bell, born July 19, 1910. All were born in this county. Mrs. Sewell is likewise a native of Wabash county, and her father and mother are both deceased. Mr. Sewell has had his home at his present place since 1897, owns a hundred and twenty acres of land largely improved under his direct management, and also employs a good deal of capital in his contracting business. Mr. Sewell has membership in no church; and in politics is a Republican.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



C. E. RADER.
Although he has been a resident of Wabash county only since 1911, C. E. Rader is already accounted one of the practical and intelligent representatives of this section's agricultural interests, his well-cultivated farm in Pleasant township evidencing his ability in his chosen field of activity and his versatility in combining modern ways with the methods proven reliable by the years of successful experience of the farmers of the older generation. Modern methods are essentially different from those of the past, but the successful operation of land still requires, as formerly, hard and well-directed labor, and it is this, perhaps, which has been the chief element in advancing Mr. Rader to his present independent position.

C. E. Rader is a native of the Hoosier state, born in Fulton county, January 22, 1883, and is a son of Schuyler C. and Mary Alice (Teeter) Rader. Philip Rader, his paternal grandfather, founded the family in Fulton county, making his way on foot overland from his home in the East, long before the advent of the railroads. He settled on an unimproved farm, two miles out of Akron, Indiana, and there passed the remainder of his life, being known as an industrious and hard-working citizen. Schuyler C. Rader was born on the farm near Akron, received his education in the public schools of that locality, and grew up amid agricultural surroundings, adopting the vocation of farming when he entered upon his own career. He was married just over the Miami county line to Miss Mary Alice Teeter, who lived in that vicinity, and for three years they made their home on a small farm owned by Mr. Rader in Kosciusko county. At the end of that period, however, they returned to Fulton county, locating on a farm upon which buildings had been erected and the greater part of the land cleared, and this continued to be the family home until April, 1902, when the father removed to a farm within one mile of Akron, this still being the place of his residence. Mr. Rader is a republican in his political views, has taken some interest in public affairs, and has served several years as road supervisor of Fulton county. He has long been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the faith of which Mrs. Rader passed away in August, 1913. There were three children in the family: C. E., and two who died in infancy.

The boyhood and youth of C. E. Rader were passed in Fulton county, where he secured his education in the public schools. He early showed a predilection for farming, and was thoroughly trained by his father in the work to which he had decided to devote his life, so that when he was ready to embark upon his own career he was well fitted to take his place among the farmers of his community. He moved to his father's farm in the spring of 1903, and from there on November 16, 1911, came to Pleasant township, Wabash county, locating on the farm known as the old Solomon Wertenberger farm, and here has continued to devote his energies to the cultivation of his valuable land. Although still a young man, Mr. Rader's life has been one of great activity, and he continues to work with the vigor and enthusiasm of the youth who has his own way to make in the world. He is a student of his vocation, keeping himself thoroughly abreast of its advancements, discoveries and inventions, and is always ready to experiment with innovations. In his community he has demonstrated his willingness to assist in movements calculated to be beneficial to his township, and, although not a politician, is an active supporter of republican principles. He was reared in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which Mrs. Rader is also a member.

On Nov. 4, 1902, Mr. Rader was married in Wabash county to Miss Tressie M. Rager, the only child of George and Mary (Anderson) Rager, farming people of this county, and to this union there have come two children: Rex, born November 13, 1906; and Ralph, born December 23, 1907, both in Fulton county.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



WILLIAM H. EBBINGHOUS.
A prosperous resident of Pleasant township, William H. Ebbinghous has lived in Wabash county practically all his life, belongs to one of the early families, and through his own industry and activities has added to the influence and honor generally associated with that name.

Born in Chester township, Wabash county, March 5, 1870, William H. Ebbinghous is a son of Frederick and Mary (Strickler) Ebbinghous. The founder of the family name and fortunes in this part of Indiana was grandfather Henry Ebbinghous, who was born in Germany, where Frederick Ebbinghous was also born, and came to Wabash county in 1854. His was one of the very early settlements made by a representative of the German fatherland in this county. Frederick Ebbinghous died on a farm adjoining that where his son William now lives in 1905. The homestead on which he lived for many years was developed almost entirely by his industry, and its buildings are largely the result of his work. Mary Strickler, the mother, is believed to have been one of the first white children born in this section of Wabash county, and she is still living at a good old age. There were four children: Matilda H., whose first husband was L. Brown and her second William Ivans; William H.; Nora, who married Bert Ogden; and Albert, who died in infancy.

William H. Ebbinghous grew up in this county, received his preliminary training in the common schools, and in preparation for work as a teacher attended the Normal School at Terre Haute for some time. His career as an educator embraces about three years, in Paw Paw township, and some ten years in Pleasant township. He is cordially remembered by many of his old pupils as a capable and efficient instructor, and did an excellent service to the coming generation through his labors in the schoolroom. After some years as a teacher Mr. Ebbinghous married Roxana Flora, daughter of Leonard and Josephine (Brown) Flora. To this marriage have been born five children now living, besides two that died in infancy. The living children are: Hubert, Beatrice, Leonard, Harold and Mabel.

After his marriage Mr. Ebbinghous lived in Paw Paw township on the farm of his wife's father, then moved to his own father's farm, and after about ten years came to his present place. He has 76.78 acres, and has done a great deal of work to make the land more valuable in every way and has remodeled both the house and barns since he occupied the farm.

Mr. Ebbinghous is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, though his father was a German Lutheran. His fraternal affiliation is with the Masonic Lodge of North Manchester and the Maccabees at Laketon. As a business man whose good judgment has often commended him to his community, Mr. Ebbinghous held the office of justice of the peace in Pleasant township for 8 years prior to 1908. In politics: he is a democrat and his father was of the same political faith.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



JAMES AND WILLIAM ARNETT.
Though James and William Arnett are not partners in a business sense, they are always spoken of in their neighborhood as the Arnett brothers, and their lives have been so closely identified that both careers are proper subjects of one sketch. On Section 20 of Noble township are the two home farms of these brothers, and such has been their enterprise and success that it is with a peculiar degree of respect and admiration that their names are spoken in that community.

Both James and William Arnett were born and educated in Wabash county, and their birthplace was the old homestead in Noble township, where their parents, Philip and Catherine (Bruner) Arnett, lived for many years. Wabash county has long esteemed the Arnett and Bruner families, and particularly well known are William Lemuel, James and Charles Bruner, maternal uncles of James and William Arnett.

Philip Arnett was orphaned at the age of three years, and the youngest of the family was an infant of six months. The children were reared in the homes of comparative strangers, and as soon as able to be of any service they were put to work. Philip Arnett was reared in the home of a carpenter, and his boyhood strength and skill were applied to learning the trade. Until twenty years he was employed by his guardian or taskmaster, as one prefers to call him, receiving for his labors his board and lodging. About that time a call came from a Grant county man, George Bruner, who required some building to be done. Young Arnett was sent to do the work, and there met the fate which largely decided his future fortunes, since the daughter of his employer subsequently became his wife. Another fact of note is that the house built by Mr. Arnett on George Bruner's place was the first frame dwelling erected between Marion and Wabash. Philip Arnett later took up his residence in Noble township, where his sons were born. Both were reared on a farm, and their educational advantages were somewhat above the average.

William Arnett today owns and occupies the farm that was a part of the old Bruner estate. The pioneer Bruner family located there at a very early time, and they were among the very first settlers in Noble township. William Arnett, while a general farmer, has become best known throughout this section of Indiana as a successful breeder of draft and high-class trotting horses. Some splendid horses have been bred and trained on his farm. To name one out of many was Myrtle Granett, which sold for fifty thousand dollars, and others of high value have been produced in his stables. His barn is one of the finest in the county, and in order to train his trotting stock he maintains a half mile track on his farm. It can be confidently asserted that no breeder in this section of the state excels Mr. Arnett, and it is with a pardonable pride that he refers to his achievements along this line.

Directly opposite from the farm of William Arnett is the home of his brother James. A road separates the two properties, and the place of James Arnett is no less a credit to the owner and to the community than that of his brother. A few years ago he erected a handsome cement block house at one corner of his estate, and that is one of the best residences in Noble township.

James Arnett was married on June 21, 1903, to Mary R. Hummer, a daughter of Luther Calvin and Marie E. (Tweedy) Hummer, both natives of New Jersey, who moved from that place to Ohio and then to Wabash county, Indiana, being farming people and well known in this county. The two children of James Arnett and wife are: Ruth Odell, born January 8, 1906; and Lucile Elizabeth, born in February, 1914.

William Arnett was married in Sun City, Kansas, September 30, 1888, to Myrtle Pickering, daughter of James and Minnie (Nelson) Pickering. To their marriage was born a son on June 30, 1889, Harry Arnett, and later a daughter, Myrtle Marie, who died in infancy. Harry Arnett married Eva Allison, and has one child, LeMoyne Arnett, born December 30, 1912.

The family of James Arnett are members of the United Brethren church, while that of William are identified with that of the Methodist Episcopal denomination. William Arnett is a member of the Royal Order of Moose and of the Horse Thief Detective Association, and both brothers are progressive in politics. These families have a high standing in the community, have hosts of good friends in and about the county, and their position as substantial and progressive people is securely established.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



GEORGE E. RUDICEL.
The name introducing this review is that of one of the representative farmers and highly esteemed citizens of Liberty township, and Mr. Rudicel is known not only for his energy and progressiveness in connection with his chosen vocation but also for his civic loyalty and earnest co-operation in those undertakings that tend to conserve the general welfare of the community. In his native township he has found excellent opportunities for achievement along the line of the great elemental industry under the influence of which he was reared, and thus there are well reinforced reasons for his appreciation of and affection for the county that has ever represented his home.

Mr. Rudicel was born on a farm in Liberty township, this county, on the 4th of September, 1858, and is a representative of one of the honored pioneer families of this favored section of the Hoosier Commonwealth. He is a son of David and Elizabeth (Hevenridge) Rudicel, the former of whom was born in Franklin county, this state, and the latter in Henry county, Indiana, this statement giving assurance that the respective families were founded in Indiana in the early pioneer era. Within a comparatively short period after his first marriage, David Rudicel came to Wabash county and established his residence on a pioneer farm in Liberty township, and there his first wife died. They became the parents of six children, all of whom are living except Mary Jane. The sons of this union are John, Edgar and Theodore, and the surviving daughters are Lavina, who is the wife of Jonathan Copeland, and Miss Catherine. For his second wife David Rudicel married Miss Elizabeth Hevenridge, and both continued their residence in Liberty township until the close of their lives, George E., of this review, being the elder of the two children, and Andrew J. being a resident of the city of Indianapolis.

George E. Rudicel was reared to adult age on the old homestead farm in Liberty township, and the district schools of the locality and period afforded him advantages that enabled him to acquire a good basic education, his services having been enlisted in the work of the home farm during the summer months, and the winter terms of school having found him a diligent and appreciative student.

Upon attaining to his legal majority Mr. Rudicel rented his father's farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits in an independent way. He denied himself neither time nor labor in his initial enterprise as a farmer, and with the passing years substantial and positive success rewarded him. He finally purchased his present farm, which comprises seventy acres, is improved with excellent buildings and maintained under effective cultivation, the appearance of the place showing fully the progressive policies and indomitable energy which have compassed its development and improvement.

In politics Mr. Rudicel is arrayed under the banner of the democratic party, and he takes a loyal and broad-minded interest in public affairs, especially those of local order, though he has never manifested any predilection for the honors or emoluments of public office. In connection with his general farming he gives special attention to the raising of standard-bred horses, and he has produced some fine types, including several now in his possession. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the lodge of Free and Accepted Masons at La Fontaine.

Christmas day of the year 1880 recorded the marriage of Mr. Rudicel to Miss Laura Straughn, who was born in Henry county, this state, but who was an infant at the time of her parents' removal to Wabash county, where she was reared and educated. Mr. and Mrs. Rudicel have one daughter, Lola, who was graduated in one of the leading conservatories of music in the city of Chicago and who is a successful teacher of music in her home community, where also she is a popular factor in social affairs, the while she aids greatly in making the parental home a center of gracious hospitality.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



JAMES B. BOYS.
Among those who have availed themselves of the admirable natural resources of Wabash county and have gained prestige as successful and representative farmers and stock-growers is this well known citizen of Liberty township, where he is proprietor of the fine demesne known as Locust Grove Stock Farm. This farm comprises 160 acres, with substantial improvements of a permanent order, and it is situated on Sections 11 and 14, three and one-half miles northeast of the progressive little city of La Fontaine.

Mr. Boys is one of the popular citizens given to W abash county by the historic old Bluegrass State, and in his personality he exemplified the best traditions and customs of that commonwealth. He was born in Fleming county, Kentucky, on the 7th of May, 1862, and is a son of William and Eliza (Jackson) Boys, both of whom were reared in that same county, where their marriage was solemnized, where they continued to reside until the close of their lives, the father having passed away in 1899 and his cherished wife having been summoned to eternal rest in 1888. They are survived by five children - John, who is a prosperous farmer in Fleming county, Kentucky; James B., whose name initiates this sketch; Mary C., who is the wife of James W. Dalrymple, of Upland, Grant county, Indiana; Martha, who is the wife of Rufus Rhenly, of Kentucky; and Americus C., who is the wife of Joseph Robey, of that State.

The conditions and influences of the old homestead farm in Kentucky compassed the childhood and youth of James B. Boys, and in the meanwhile he made good use of the advantages afforded in the local schools, so that he waxed strong in both mental and physical powers. On the 1st of January, 1883, about four months prior to attaining to his legal majority, Mr. Boys came to Wabash county, Indiana, where he has since maintained his home and where he has won success worthy of the name. This is shown forth conclusively in his ownership of one of the fine farms of the county, and he gives his attention to diversified agriculture and to the raising of fine grades of live stock, in which latter department of enterprise he has achieved marked precedence and reputation that transcends mere local limitations.

During the years of his residence in Indiana Mr. Boys has been aligned as an advocate and supporter of the cause of the Republican party until the national election of 1912, when he designated his earnest convictions by transferring his allegiance to the newly organized progressive party. Both he and his wife are zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church at La Fontaine.

August 20, 1885, gave record of the marriage of Mr. Boys to Miss Anna A. Asbury, who was born in Kentucky and who was three years of age at the time of her parentsí removal to Indiana, where she was reared and educated. Mr. and Mrs. Boys have three children: Mabel L. is the wife of Kenneth Parker, of La Fontaine; Lawrence L., who was graduated in the Marion Business College, at Marion, Grant county, and who married Miss Elsie Bowman, is a progressive young farmer of Liberty township; John C., who likewise was graduated in the Marion Business College, after a two years' course in the La Fontaine high school, is associated with his father in the work and management of the home farm.

"History of Wabash County, Indiana"
Clarkson W. Weesner
Lewis Publishing Co.
Chicago and New York
published in 1914



Deb Murray