MRS. JACOB B. MARKLEYWholly devoted to home and domestic duties, doing through all the best years of her life the sacred work that comes within her sphere, there is not much to record concerning the life of the average woman. And yet what station so dignified, what relation so loving and endearing, what office so holy, tender and ennobling as those of the home-making wife and mother? A celebrated writer has said that the future destiny of a nation depended upon its wives and mothers. In a biographical compendium such as this, woman should have no insignificant representation. As manís equal in many respects, and even his superior in the gentle, tender and loving amenities of life, she fully merits a much larger notice than she ordinarily receives. The foregoing was suggested after a perusal of the leading facts in the career of the worthy and respected lady whose name forms the caption to this article, a lady who has done well her part and whose career has been a simple, but beautiful poem of rugged, toilsome duty faithfully and uncomplainingly performed as maiden, wife and mother.

Mrs. Martha Markley, widow of the late Jacob B. Markley, is a daughter of Samuel and Susan (Jackson) Wallace, and was born in Rock Creek township this county, on the 12th of April, 1852. Samuel Wallace was a native of Ireland and in that country was reared and educated. He remained there until he was twenty-eight years old, when, in 1833, he came to America, where he believed better opportunities existed. He landed in Philadelphia, where he worked as a laborer for a short time, and about 1837 came to Wells county and entered a tract of land in Rock Creek township. The land was wild and unimproved, but he was strong, energetic and ambitious and in course of time succeeded in creating for himself a comfortable home and a valuable farm. He was united in marriage, in 1840, with Miss Susan Jackson, a native of North Carolina, but whose parents were among the first settlers in Liberty township, this county. To them were born thirteen children as follows: Fannie, Rachael, Anna, James, David, Elizabeth, Catherine, Martha, Mary, Thomas, Matthew, Finley, and one that died in infancy unnamed. Samuel Wallace was a firm and uncompromising Republican in politics and in religious belief was a Presbyterian.

Martha Wallace was early taught the lessons of successful housekeeping, growing into a well developed and graceful womanhood, and was given the advantages of as good an education as the schools of that day afforded. On the 24th of April, 1872, she was united in marriage with Jacob B. Markley, who was a resident of Harrison township, though born in Ohio and coming to Wells county in 1864. To this union were born the following children: Arthur Wallace married Anna Markley and resides in Lancaster township; Bessie Florence, who was educated in the Northern Indiana Normal School and subsequently taught four terms. She became the wife of Archie Norton and resides in Winters, Michigan; Lora Jane attended the normal schools at Danville and Valparaiso and then taught three terms of school at Newville, Indiana; she was married April 1, 1902, to Arlie Thompson and now resides in Ft. Wayne, Indiana; Carl Boyd; Ruth Agnes. Mr. Markley was a stanch Republican and took a keen interest in the trend of passing events. He was a man of more than ordinary energy, sound judgment and superior business abilities, and as a farmer took high rank, being regarded as an up-to-date agriculturist, a man of broad intelligence and a leader in enterprises for the general prosperity of the community.

Since her husbandís death Mrs. Markley has manifested business abilities of a high order in the management of the estate. She is of a sincerely religious nature, belonging, with her children, to the Presbyterian church, and her life has abounded in good works in the church and among the deserving poor in the world outside. She is held in the highest esteem and numbers warm-hearted friends by the score in the community where she has spent so many years. She has experienced many of lifeís vicissitudes, and sorrows, but she has also enjoyed many of its triumphs and is now surrounded by those who have long known and respected her.

Biographical Memoirs of Wells Counties, Indiana B. F. Bowen, Publisher, 1903
Submitted by: Colleen Rutledge


THOMAS WALLACE, deceased, was a native of Ireland, born in county Donegal, January 1, 1813, a son of James and Nancy (McClure) Wallace, who were natives of the same country. He grew to manhood in his native land, remaining with his parents until after his majority, and in his youth received a common-school education by attending the schools of his neighborhood. In 1833 he accompanied his fatherís family to America, they located in Wayne County. Two years later our subject came to Wells County, Indiana, and entered ninety acres of Government land in Rock Creek Township, which he cleared and improved. He was united in marriage in 1851 to Miss Agnes Crosby, a native of Berwickshire, Scotland, and a daughter of Thomas and Christina (Kelley) Crosby, who left Scotland for America in the year 1850. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wallace, of whom only four survive, their names being as followsóChristiana, Maggie, Mary and Martha. Mr. Wallace followed agricultural pursuits on his farm in Rock Creek Township until 1864, when he retired from active life and removed to Bluffton, where he made his home until his death. He was an active and consistent member of the Presbyterian church, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. Mrs. Wallace is also a member of the Presbyterian church. In his political views Mr. Wallace affiliated with the Republican party. He was an active and public-spirited citizen, and was always interested in any enterprise for the benefit or advancement of his town or county.

History of Wells County, Indiana, 1887, Lewis Publishers
Submitted by: Colleen Rutledge


JOHN GREGG. For nearly three score years actively identified with the development and advancement of the agricultural interests of Wells County, the late John Gregg of Liberty Township was an honored representative of the early pioneers of this section of the state, and a true type of the energetic and enterprising men who, by diligent toil, succeeded in transforming a forest-covered land into a fertile and productive agricultural region. A native of Ireland, he was born in County Donegal, May 9, 1829. His parents, Richard and Fannie (McClure) Gregg, life-long residents of Ireland, reared several children, three of who, John, William and Daniel, immigrated in early manhood to America.

Arriving in the United States in June, 1851, John Gregg found his first employment in Philadelphia, after which he followed, his trade of bricklayer in Wayne County, Ohio, for a while, in the meantime purchasing a tract of wild land in Liberty Township, Wells County, Indiana. In 1855 Mr. Gregg visited his relatives and friends in Ireland, remaining there about six months. Returning to this country early in 1856, Mr. Gregg married soon after, and immediately settled on his farm in Liberty Township. He cleared and improved his homestead of 130 acres, and during his many years of active life occupied a leading position among the skilful and practical agriculturists of his community. In 1879 he again visited his old home in Ireland, remaining a few months. His death which occurred February 9, 1907, was deemed a loss, not only to his immediate family, but to town and county.

Mr. Gregg married, October 19, 1858, Fannie Wallace, who was born in Rock Creek Township, Wells County, March 28, 1841, a daughter of Samuel and Susanna (Jackson) Wallace. Her father was born in Ireland November 19, 1805 and in 1832 came to the United States, and having settled in Wells County, Indiana, bought land in Rock Creek Township, where he was for many years extensively engaged in farming, being proprietor of large tracts of land. Mrs. Gregg still occupies the homestead on which she and her husband lived so happily together for forty-nine years. She united when young with the Presbyterian Church at Bluffton, to which her husband also belonged, and is now one of its valued and esteemed members. Thirteen children were born of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Gregg, eight of whom are living, namely: Richard S., engaged in farming in Harrison Township; Sarah J., living with her mother; J. W. of Detroit, Michigan; Joseph D. of Liberty Center; Mary E., wife of F. R. Cochran of Missouri; Fannie E., wife of Joseph H. Bumbaugh of Jay County, Indiana; Thomas D. of Liberty Township; and John W., living with his mother and sister. Mrs. Gregg also reared a grandson, Kenneth E. Gregg, whom she took into her home and heart when he was but five months old, his birth having occurred March 12, 1901. He is now a junior in the Liberty Center High School.

Standard History of Adams and Wells County, Indiana, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1918
Submitted by: Colleen Rutledge


REV. JONATHAN J. MARKLEY is a native of Wells County, Indiana, born in Harrison Township, March 7, 1839. His parents, John and Melinda (Wilson) Markley, were natives of Maryland and Ohio respectively, the father born near Baltimore March 10, 1809, and reared in Pennsylvania, and the mother born January 12, 1816. They were married in Madison County, Ohio, and to them were born eleven children, eight of whom grew to maturity, their names in order of their birth being as follows: Mrs. Rachel Adsit, living in Iroquois County, Illinois; Jonathan J., the subject of this sketch; William D., residing in Wells County; Mrs. Ellen J. Studabaker, of Wells County; Mrs. Tillie J. Sturgis, of Bluffton; Lewis P., of Greene County, Ohio: Samuel T., of Clinton County, Indiana, and Wilson A., living on the old homestead in Harrison Township. The parents were pioneer settlers of Wells County, settling in the wilderness of Harrison Township in February, 1837, about two years after their marriage. The father died on his pioneer homestead in 1869. He came to the county a poor man, but by industry and frugality he accumulated a large property, leaving at his death about 700 acres of land besides considerable personal property. He was a man of sterling character, and one whose word was considered as good as his bond, and was held in high esteem by all who knew him. In politics he was formerly a Whig, and later a Republican. For about twenty years previous to his death he was a consistent member of the Christian church. The widowed mother still resides on the old homestead in Harrison Township with her son Wilson. Rev. Jonathan J. Markley, the subject of this sketch, has spent most of his life in Wells county, receiving his early education in the common schools of the county. He was a student at Liber College in Jay County, and later attended the Union Christian College in Sullivan County, Indiana, finishing his studies when twenty-eight years of age. In 1865 he united with the Christian church, and from that time has devoted himself to the cause of the Master. He commenced his ministerial work in 1869, and was ordained in 1872. Since 1869 he has had charge of the Christian church at Murray. Mr. Markley was united in marriage January 18, 1871, to Miss Mary Hoffman, who was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, August 18, 1840, a daughter of Philip Hoffman, of Wells County. Immediately after his marriage Mr. Markley made his home on section 19, Lancaster Township, near his present residence, and is still living in that section. He owns a fine farm property containing 210 acres, which is under a good state of cultivation. In politics Mr. Markley is a Republican. He is an active temperance worker, and in sympathy with prohibition.

Standard History of Adams and Wells County, Indiana, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1918
Submitted by: Colleen Rutledge


JONATHAN MARKLEY, farmer, section 20, Harrison Township, was born in this county June 4, 1838, and is the oldest white child now living that was born in the county. His parents were Gabriel and Hannah Markley. He was reared on a farm, and obtained a limited education in the early subscription schools that were taught in the primitive log cabin. He remained under the parental roof until his marriage, which occurred December 21, 1858, with Miss Catherine, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Brasier) Sturgis. After his marriage Mr. Markley resided on a farm near the old homestead for several years. He then removed to Newville, where he followed farming until the spring of 1882, when he sold out and purchased his present farm in Harrison Township. he owns 160 acres of well-improved land in a good state of cultivation. he also owns forty acres on section 19. Mr. and Mrs. Markley are the parents of thirteen children, eleven of whom are livingóGabriel T., George F., John E., Lulu May, Hannah Bell, Oliver E., William Henry, Ernest E., Jonathan Leander, Wilford I. and Charlie D. The deceased are Elva, May and Katie. Both parents are active members of the Christian church, and politically Mr. Markley affiliates with the Prohibition party.

Standard History of Adams and Wells County, Indiana, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1918
Submitted by: Colleen Rutledge


JOHN W. MARKLEY, farmer, section 18, Harrison Township, was born in that township February 3, 1843, second son and third child of Gabriel Markley, now deceased. He was reared on a farm, and obtained his education in the subscription and common schools. He remained with his parents until the breaking out of the late civil war, when he enlisted, August 15, 1862 in Company B, One Hundred and First Indiana Infantry. He participated in many hard fought battles. Among the most prominent were the battles of Chickamauga, Atlanta, and with Sherman to the sea. During the fight at Chickamauga he received a wound from a ball passing across his breast which disabled him from active duty for about two months. While following Morganís troops he met with a narrow escape from the rebel prisons; he was captured, and released the same night. After serving three years he was honorably discharged June 19, 1865, at Louisville, Kentucky. He was married October 24, 1867, to Miss Araminta, daughter of David and Catherine (Gates) Powell, the former a native of Hancock County, Maryland, and the latter of Belmont County, Ohio. They came to this county in 1845, where Mr. Powell died in 1877. Mrs. Markley was born in this county October 26, 1848. After his marriage Mr. Markley settled upon his present farm in Harrison Township, where he owns 272 acres of improved land in a high state of cultivation. They have had five children, four of whom are deceasedóLeora died January 19, 1881, aged ten years and four months; Alma died January 28, 1884, aged eight years and seven months; Hannah C., born February 9, 1881, died May 13 1882; Franklin, born January 13, 1873, still survives; one child died in infancy. Mrs. Markley is a member of the Christian church. In politics Mr. Markley affiliates with the National party.

Standard History of Adams and Wells County, Indiana, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1918
Submitted by: Colleen Rutledge


SIMON B. BICKEL
Among the well known citizens of Harrison township, Wells County, Indiana, is Simon B. Bickel, who was born in Darke county, Ohio, June 27, 1848, and is a son of John and Margaret (Moyer) Bickel, the former a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and the latter of Butler county, Ohio. John Bickel was reared to farming in his native county, receiving the education usually imparted to farmerís lads. From Pennsylvania he removed to Butler county, Ohio, with his parents, and was there married to Miss Moyer. He later moved to Darke county, Ohio, where he purchased a tract of five hundred acres of land and for some years was engaged in agricultural pursuits, but later in life conducted a hotel at Hill Grove, Ohio, where his wife passed away at the age of seventy-five years, and where his own death occurred when he had reached the good old age of eighty-eight. Mr. Bickel was a member of the Masonic fraternity and his earthly possessions were quite extensive, he being considered one of the wealthiest men in his part of Ohio. To John Bickel and wife was born a family of eight boys and four girls, viz: Lewis, deceased, John W., Susan, deceased, Henry, Mary Catherine, Simon B. and Alexander (twins), Franklin, William, Minurva J., deceased and Harrison.

Simon B. Bickel was reared to farming on the family homestead, receiving in the meantime a district school education. On February 23, 1871, he married, in Darke county, Ohio, Miss Sarah J. Dougherty, the accomplished daughter of William and Margaret (Studabaker) Dougherty, and sister of Hugh Dougherty, president of the Studabaker Bank. In March, 1875, Mr. Bickel brought his young family from Ohio to Wells county, Indiana, and here agriculture and stock raising have since occupied his attention, in both of which he has met with abundant success in the townships of Lancaster and Harrison.

The children born to Simon B. and Sarah J. (Dougherty) Bickel are numbered four, Hugh D., Margaret E., deceased, Bessie E. and Gertrude E. Of these, Hugh married Carrie Swisher; Bessie is the wife of Charles Porter, and Gertrude is still single; she was graduated from the Bluffton high school land also from the Huntington Business College, of Huntington, Indiana.

Mr. Bickel is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, in which he holds an insurance policy on his life for two thousand dollars, believing in the wisdom of making ample provisions for his family at a minimum cost. Mr. and Mrs. Bickel are devoted members of Six Mile Christian church, to the maintenance of which they are liberal contributors and in the promulgation of whose doctrines they feel an earnest interest. In 1902 Mr. Bickel represented his congregation as a delegate to the Eel River conference at Goshen, and is at all times ready to devote his time and means to the promotion of the welfare of the Six Mile church in particular, as well as that of the church in general. The political creed of Mr. Bickel is to be found in the platform of the Democratic party, and he is as active and as energetic in caring for and promoting its interests as he is in advancing to a prosperous consummation every thing he undertakes.

Mr. Bickelís farm is situated in sections 2 and 11, Harrison township, Wells county, and on this place are several sand and gravel pits, from which has been dug the material necessary for the use of the city of Bluffton for the past twenty years, and since he settled here, in 1892, he has sold the product of his pits to the amount of sixteen thousand dollars. Mr. Bickel cannot and does not complain of the manner in which Dame Fortune has treated him since he has been a resident of Wells county, but he must be awarded the credit of having to a great extent been the directing genius which pointed out to the gentle goddess the course she should take in seeking the road to ultimate success.

Biographical Memoirs of Wells Co., IN, 1903, B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Submitted by: Colleen Rutledge


MAJOR PETER STUDABAKER, an active and influential citizen of Wells County, a member of the banking firm of John Studabaker & Co., and an extensive farmer, is a native of the State of Ohio, born in Darke County, February 26, 1833. His parents, Abraham and Elizabeth (HARDMAN) Studabaker, were among the first settlers of Darke County. Major Studabaker was reared and educated in his native county at the common schools until attaining the age of fourteen years, when he came to Bluffton and entered the store of his brother, John Studabaker (to whom he is indebted for his early business education), as clerk, and continued so until 1851, when at only eighteen years of age, he was taken into partnership with his brother in the dry goods business. He was united in marriage, October 28, 1852, to Sarah MORGAN, daughter of John Morgan, an extensive miller from Lancaster, Ohio. They have five living children, three sons and two daughters. George W., the eldest was married to Olive KEMP in 1876, and lives on a farm near Bluffton, and is employed as paying teller in the Exchange Bank. James M. was married to Emma ERVIN in 1881, and resides in Bluffton and is a dealer in jewelry. Anna E. was married to John H. THORNBURG, a druggist of Farmland, Indiana, in 1882, and resides there. Alice was married in 1887, to Charles E. LACEY, a young attorney and member of the firm of Wilson, Todd & Lacey, and resides in Bluffton. Hugh D., the youngest, is at home, and looks after the farm and stock. David, a bright boy of eleven years, was accidentally drowned in the Wabash River June 10, 1868. In 1857 Mr. Studabaker retired from the dry goods business and engaged in farming and stock-raising and buying and shipping to Eastern markets. In 1858, then but twenty-five years of age, he was elected treasurer of Wells County, and in 1860 was re-elected to the same office. When the Rebellion of 1861 broke out he took an active part in raising volunteers for the Union army. In 1862 he enlisted as a private, while yet county treasurer, and August 15, 1862, was commissioned Captain of Company B, One Hundred and First Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was immediately sent to the front with the regiment, and on June 1, 1863, was commissioned Major of his regiment. The regiment saw much active service and was in most of the battles under General Thomas in the Fourteenth Army Corps, and in the battle of Chickamauga was the last to leave the battlefield. He was with Sherman in the Atlanta campaign and marched with him to the sea at Savannah, thence through the Carolinas to Goldsborough, thence to Raleigh, North Carolina, and after the surrender of Johnstonís army marched to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, West Virginia, and was in the grand reunion at Washington in May, 1865. From thence he traveled to Louisville, Kentucky, by rail and steamboat, and was there mustered out with his men June 24, 1865. From thence he went to Indianapolis, Indiana, where the regiment was paid off, and he returned home July 4, 1865. He was wounded in the left foot at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, but while in the service never lost a day from sickness or any other cause. No company of soldiers ever had an officer who was more devoted to their welfare and comfort than the company that Major Studabaker led to the field from Wells County, as is well attested by the surviving members of his regiment. After his return he resumed farming and stock raising and in 1866 accepted the position of cashier in the First National Bank, and in 1869 he became a member of the Exchange Bank of John Studabaker & Co., which as a private bank is meeting with excellent success. In 1874 Major Studabaker was elected commissioner of Wells County, was re-elected to the same office in 1876 and 1880, and while commissioner had the superintending of the building of the county infirmary and jail, two splendid buildings of which the people of the county are justly proud, and also took an active part in building both our railroads and was among the foremost in advocacy of our free gravel roads, and the people of the county are largely indebted to Major Studabaker for the success of that enterprise in our midst. As a business man and accountant he has no superior in the county, and his integrity, honesty and judgment are so well known that his advice is sought after more frequently, perhaps, in both public and private affairs than that of any other man in Bluffton. Considered either as a man, a county official, neighbor, soldier, patriot or friend, Major Studabaker is popular and honorable. In politics he is a Democrat and cast his first vote as such. He is a member of the Baptist church and also of the Masonic lodge of Bluffton, Indiana. Both he and his wife are highly esteemed, and are well and favorably known for their generosity and acts of kindness. Their home is open to their many friends.

Standard History of Adams and Wells County, Indiana, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1918
Submitted by: Colleen Rutledge


Deb Murray